10
   

ART TROVE IN MUNICH WORTH 1.5 BILLION EUROS

 
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Nov, 2013 11:35 am
@Thomas,
It happened before as well (since 1947) . But a) not as often as later, b) with nearly no international "publicity".
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Nov, 2013 11:37 am
@Thomas,
Personally, I think that the German government should confiscate the lot, auction them off for several billion and prop up the euro for another six months. (Insert mischevious face here)
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Thu 21 Nov, 2013 01:01 pm
New paintings, eg. by Munch. Liebermann, Toulouse-Lautrec are now online
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Fri 22 Nov, 2013 04:21 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Today, the Süddeutsche Zeitung published a report that the prosecution actually wanted to give those "doubtlessly belonging to Gurlitt" paintings already in spring. Easter was set as date - but they couldn't contact him anymore.
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Nov, 2013 05:57 am
@Walter Hinteler,
I suppose he's pissed. Understandable, if unconstructive.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Sat 23 Nov, 2013 07:06 am
Reading all the critics of foreign media and organisations ... I'm not saying
that our legal and judiciary is the best, but obviously is not only different but also not well understood by others.

Example here: prosecution.

In Germany there are only two levels of prosecution offices in the cities and in each states, the General prosecution office and the Prosecutor’s Offices;.(But and four levels of courts Amtsgericht [district court], Landgericht [county court], Oberlandgericht [state supreme court] Bundesgericht [(various) Federal Courts].
The prosecution offices are in the towns of the county courts. Prosecutors are civil servants.

The most important fact is that in German criminal proceeding the prosecutor is "Mistress of the Proceedings" (Herrin des Verfahrens, prosecution office is female in German), that
means that the prosecutor has the final decision about the ending of a case.
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Mon 25 Nov, 2013 11:17 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Quote:
Bavarian Justice Minister Winfried Bausback has defended the controversial handling of the trove of possibly looted art in a Munich apartment. He has also called for a new law to lift the statute of limitations in such cases in the future.

Interview (in English) @ Spiegel
0 Replies
 
Abishai100
 
  0  
Reply Fri 29 Nov, 2013 02:13 am
@farmerman,
All this Nazi lost art talk makes me think about how difficult it is for the German people to recover from the international social stigma that Eva Braun (girlfriend of Adolf Hitler) had some severe female psychosis ant-social disorder, making it difficult for her to "secretly stash" or save art from being destroyed by the Nazis (she was a woman after all).

I like how in that Spielberg film the Nazis are associated with the collection and tampering of not only humanist art but also folk religion relics.

Those Nazis were ravenous.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Dec, 2013 12:05 pm
http://i1334.photobucket.com/albums/w641/Walter_Hinteler/b_zps552660f2.jpg

Monuments Men: The Soldiers Who Saved Europe's Art from Hitler

Quote:
Under Hitler the Germans had stolen some 5 million artworks from across Europe -- the biggest theft in history. After the armistice, the Monuments Men concentrated on locating and returning these works to their rightful owners. The special unit, which had by this time grown to 350 men, acted as treasure hunters, combing through archives and the homes of Nazi officials, and interviewing museum directors and eyewitnesses.
Lordyaswas
 
  2  
Reply Thu 5 Dec, 2013 12:19 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2493980/Nazi-art-loot-German-dealer-quizzed-U-S-military-just-war.html


"How U.S. military quizzed German dealer of £1bn Nazi art loot just after the war... but then let him go (along with the odd Chagall and Matisse)

In the chaotic aftermath of World War Two, the nervous art dealer battled to keep his composure while American investigators fired questions at him.

How had he come by such an astonishing art collection? He told them that he had taken it with him to Aschbach in Germany when he and his family fled Dresden after the city was devastated by Allied bombing in February 1945.

Even though the investigators were suspicious, they let Hildebrandt Gurlitt go... along with hundreds of artworks, including pieces by Chagall and Matisse, now valued at £1billion.

The fact the Americans suspected Gurlitt all those years ago - as revealed today in U.S. military documents - only adds to the mystery surrounding the treasure trove recently found in a Munich apartment.

n 1945, the American military seized 20 boxes of art from Gurlitt in Aschbach, according to documents located in the U.S. National Archives in Washington.

Gurlitt had worked closely with the Nazi regime in the 1930s to sell art it considered 'degenerate' to fill its war coffers.

American investigators at the time expressed doubts about Gurlitt's claims to the works, but they eventually decided that in most cases he was the rightful owner.

So on December 15, 1950, the U.S. returned 206 items to him: 115 paintings, 19 drawings and 72 'various other objects'.

At least three of the artworks documented by the Americans have now resurfaced, found hidden in the Munich apartment of Gurlitt's son, 80-year-old Cornelius Gurlitt, during a tax evasion probe that German prosecutors announced earlier this week.

The three paintings that the Americans returned to Cornelius' father in 1950 and which have turned up in the Munich trove are Max Liebermann's Two Riders On The Beach; Otto Dix's self-portrait and an allegorical painting by Marc Chagall.

Also found in the son's apartment were paintings, drawings, engravings, woodcuts and prints by Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Oskar Kokoschka, and leading German artists Dix, Liebermann and Ernst Ludwig Kirchner."
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Dec, 2013 02:43 pm
@Lordyaswas,
so out of 1280 pieces found in Munich this year 3 were noted by american forces to be in possession of papa after the war.

spell binding stuff!
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Dec, 2013 06:11 am
No new and/or exciting new, but a three page report in Spiegel about the ...

Art Dealer to the Führer: Hildebrand Gurlitt's Deep Nazi Ties
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 27 Mar, 2014 12:20 am
An update:
More potentially looted artworks have now surfaced. Gurlitt as agreed to return the paintings to their rightful owners.

German artwork hoarder to return Nazi-looted works
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Thu 27 Mar, 2014 02:40 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Not just Gurlitt.

Quote:
A Norwegian museum has agreed to return a Matisse painting, looted by the Nazis, to the family of Jewish art dealer Paul Rosenberg.

Woman in a Blue Dress in front of a Fireplace has been on display at the Henie Onstad Art Centre (HOK) since 1968.

The gallery said that although it acquired the painting in good faith, it had "chosen to adhere to international conventions and return the painting.''

Its worth is estimated at $20m (£12m).

The work was painted in 1937 and bought by Rosenberg, the famed art collector who represented Picasso as well as Matisse.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-26680049
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 27 Mar, 2014 11:28 am
@izzythepush,
http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2014/mar/27/german-reclusive-art-collector-cornelius-gurlitt-nazi-looted-works

(Haven't read it yet myself.., but the headline says he'll return the nazi looted works to descendents of original owners)
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Sat 29 Mar, 2014 11:25 pm
Nazi art stash linked to The Monuments Men mine
Quote:
The mystery over the billion-dollar art hoard gathered by Hildebrand Gurlitt has again deepened with the discovery of another 180 masterpieces and the emergence of another property now suspected to have been a warehouse for art looted by the Nazis.

The latest find, including a 1903 Monet oil painting of London’s Tower Bridge worth an estimated £8m, a bronze sculpture by Renoir and drawings by Gauguin, Cezanne and Picasso, was allegedly recovered from a property belonging to Hildebrand’s son Cornelius. He claimed he had inherited the collection from his father, who took orders from Hitler to buy and sell so-called “degenerate art” to fund Nazi activities during the Second World War.
[...]
A journalist from the Vienna-based television station Puls 4 revealed last week the existence of the third house linked to Mr Gurlitt, which is thought to have been used as a storage depot for the family collection and is said to have been “stuffed with art” until 2012. The total number of works recovered now stands at 238.

Hildebrand’s cousin, Wolfgang Gurlitt, was also active on behalf of Hitler in acquiring artworks and, like Hildebrand, had used his Jewish ancestry to supposedly help Jewish refugees by acquiring their artwork at a fraction of its value. According to property title deeds published by Puls 4, the Bad Aussee estate was occupied by Wolfgang Gurlitt and is still in family ownership.

The “huge estate” in the village of Bad Aussee, Styria, is home to Roman salt mines that were used to store some 6,000 artworks, which Hitler tried to destroy shortly before the war ended. It is estimated that less than half of the collection, recently featured in the George Clooney film The Monuments Men, was returned to the original owners.
[...]
Last week, the Süddeutsche Zeitung newspaper quoted Mr Gurlitt’s lawyer, Christoph Edel, as saying his client wanted to “return all (artworks) that have been stolen or robbed from Jewish ownership to each of their owners or descendants”.

Hildebrand was elected the director of the Kunstverein, Dusseldorf’s venerable art institution and died unexpectedly in a car crash in 1956. His son Cornelius, now 81, has been declared unfit to manage his affairs because of his age and infirmity.

Mr Edel and Austrian investigators have declined to comment on the contents of the Bad Aussee property.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Mar, 2014 05:18 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Its getting more and more interesting. Sounds like Gurlitts ' only defense is his age and infirmity.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Mar, 2014 05:41 am
@farmerman,
Defence? Whatever the real background of all those paintings is - he inherited them as far as it known.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Mar, 2014 05:56 am
@Walter Hinteler,
don't you think they will be repatriated?

Besides, theres been almost 70 years since WWII. Inherit or not, he is sitting on works of art that were originally taken or purchased cheaply through duress
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Mar, 2014 06:00 am
@farmerman,
That's what he said about those, originally belonging to Jewish owners.

I have no information about what will happen with the others.
 

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