10
   

ART TROVE IN MUNICH WORTH 1.5 BILLION EUROS

 
 
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Nov, 2014 11:13 am
@farmerman,
Goering probably swapped it for a new ivory swagger stick.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Nov, 2014 12:31 pm
@farmerman,
The Bern Museum only gets those paintings, which are definitely not looted.
(Besides that, one of Gurlitt's cousins claims to be a heir, too.)


Rosenberg had kept his paintings (about 160) in a bank safe in Libourne in 1940. He and his family then fled via Spain to the USA.
The Nazis sometime later them ... and somehow they came to the Galerie nationale du Jeu de Paume in Paris. In 1944, the Paris art dealer Gustav Rochlitz bought them (he was friendly with a lot of Nazis, including Goering).
It's not known how Hildebrand Gurlitt got the Matisse, but when in 1956 his widow had inherited his collection - it was obviously there.

Rosenberg resp. his heirs got some of his paintings back - 62 were lost. (now 61)
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Fri 9 Oct, 2015 11:29 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Quote:
BERLIN (AP) — Germany's culture minister hopes to put some works from the trove of priceless art accumulated by the late collector Cornelius Gurlitt on exhibition next year.

Der Spiegel magazine reported Friday that the plan is for an exhibition opening at the end of 2016 at the Bundeskunsthalle museum in Bonn. Culture Minister Monika Gruetters' office confirmed the report but said it couldn't give further details.

Der Spiegel said the exhibition could contain works that may have been taken by the Nazis from Jewish owners. It quoted Gruetters as saying that, while organizers must show "respect for the victims," she hopes for new clues on the works' origins.

Her office noted that a 2014 agreement under which Switzerland's Kunstmuseum Bern agreed to accept Gurlitt's bequest of his collection allows for works that were looted, or whose background hasn't been cleared up, to be "exhibited with the aim of full transparency."

Gurlitt died in May 2014, a few months after it emerged that authorities had seized some 1,400 items at his Munich apartment while investigating a tax case in 2012. Officials have been checking whether several hundred of the works were seized from their owners by the Nazis.

A task force set up to examine the provenance of works in the collection so far has determined that four pieces were looted by the Nazis, and the first two were handed over to their rightful owners' heirs in May.

That task force is to wrap up its work at the end of this year. Gruetters wants the government-backed German Lost Art Foundation to take charge of any further research efforts that may be required.
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Fri 27 Oct, 2017 07:31 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Works hoarded by son of Nazi art dealer to go on public display
Quote:
Joint exhibitions in Germany and Switzerland displaying hundreds of works found in homes of Cornelius Gurlitt will open next week

Hundreds of works of art that were hoarded by the son of a Nazi art dealer will go on public display for the first time in decades in joint exhibitions in Germany and Switzerland opening next week.

Kunstmuseum Bern and the Bundeskunsthalle in Bonn will present the works found in the homes of Cornelius Gurlitt in two parallel shows called Gurlitt Status Report that are expected to draw art lovers from around the world.

Around 1,500 works, including pieces by Claude Monet, Paul Cézanne, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Otto Dix and Gustave Courbet, worth hundreds of millions of euros were discovered in Gurlitt’s Munich and Salzburg residences by tax inspectors and revealed in 2013, in what was described as the biggest artistic find of the postwar era.
... ... ...
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Oct, 2017 11:08 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Thnk dor the update. I wonder whether they will post an internet "gallery" f these works for the world(any any still extant owners of the works) to see?

The Monet of the Bridge will be worth close to 100 million Ill bet
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Oct, 2017 11:20 am
@farmerman,
Links to the exhibitions in >Bonn here< and >here Bern<.
0 Replies
 
coluber2001
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Oct, 2017 11:26 am
Quote:
Hitler was going to the opera to hear Wagner (conducted by the modernist Gustav Mahler


Mahler died in 1911.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Oct, 2017 11:49 am
@coluber2001,
coluber2001 wrote:

Quote:
Hitler was going to the opera to hear Wagner (conducted by the modernist Gustav Mahler


Mahler died in 1911.
Mahler was alive before his death. (Hitler heard Mahler conducting Lohengrin in Vienna)
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Oct, 2017 12:04 pm
@coluber2001,
... but Hitler had extraordinary hearing.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Oct, 2017 12:29 pm
@Ragman,
Actually, Hitler saw Tristan and Isolde, conducted by Mahler (then musical director of the Hofoper) on 8 May, 1906.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 Nov, 2017 07:09 am
@Walter Hinteler,
The Gurlitt find: double "degenerate art" exhibition in Bern and Bonn
Quote:
While the Bern exhibition focuses on "degenerate art" and includes objects once considered lost, the Bonn show includes mainly Nazi-looted artworks or those of questionable provenance.
Interesting slide show in the above linked report.

farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Nov, 2017 03:23 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
I wonder, of this entire cache, how much of the art is fake? Think about
Han van Meegeren and his whole story. I iamgine it will take many years of inspection and forensics to see whats real and whats not.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Jul, 2018 09:43 am
@farmerman,
Quote:
Cezanne's "La Montagne Sainte-Victoire" was found in the trove of notorious "art hermit" Cornelius Gurlitt in 2014. How the work came to be in the hands of the Nazis remains a mystery.

The Bern Museum of Fine Art in Switzerland will retain ownership of a Paul Cezanne painting found in a Nazi-era trove in 2014, the artist's heirs confirmed on Tuesday. They also said that the museum had agreed to regularly exhibit the work in Cezanne's hometown of Aix-en-Provence, France.

"This solution in the spirit of the Swiss-French friendship and partnership allows two great museums, Bern Museum of Fine Art and the Musee Granet in Aix-en-Provence, to show a masterpiece by our grandfather Paul Cezanne for the benefit and enjoyment of a great audience," said Philippe Cezanne (pictured above), great-grandson of the master painter.

The painting was found in the now-infamous Gurlitt collection, originally amassed by German art dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt under direction from the Nazis to sell or get rid of "degenerate" art seized from museums.

But Gurlitt kept many of the paintings, and his son Cornelius Gurlitt had kept the collection stored in his Munich apartment until he died at the age of 81 in 2014. In his will, he left the works to the Bern museum.

How the painting, the 1897 landscape "La Montagne Sainte-Victoire," ended up in Gurlitt's possession remains a mystery. It was the property of the Cezanne family until 1940, but the family has said that it was not stolen from them by the Nazis.

"When and under which circumstances Hildebrand Gurlitt acquired the work remains unclear," the Bern museum said,

The painting is currently part of the Bern museum's exhibition "Gurlitt: Status Report; Part 2 Nazi Art Theft and Its Consequences."

dw

Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Jul, 2018 09:45 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:

Links to the exhibitions in >Bonn here< and >here Bern<.


Kunstmuseum Bern: GURLITT: STATUS REPORT NAZI ART THEFT AND ITS CONSEQUENCES
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 26 Aug, 2018 02:18 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Henry Moore sketch found among Gurlitt hoard of Nazi-looted art
Quote:
An authentic watercolour sketch by Henry Moore, one of the most famous British artists of the 20th century, has been identified among the notorious Gurlitt hoard of more than 1,500 works, many of them Nazi loot inherited by German art dealer Cornelius Gurlitt from his father.

The coloured sketch of reclining figures, dating from the 1920s, has been identified through the BBC programme Fake or Fortune? and is believed to be the only UK work in the vast hoard of paintings and drawings discovered in Germany in 2012.

Although many of the works of art including pieces by Claude Monet, Paul Cézanne, Pablo Picasso and Otto Dix have deeply tainted origins, stolen by the Nazis or the result of forced sales from Jewish collectors, the programme also established that the drawing, dating from the 1920s, was actually given by Moore to a German museum, and was bought before the war by Gurlitt’s father.

The programme was asked to investigate the origins and authenticity of the drawing by the Kunstmuseum in Bern, the oldest fine art museum in Switzerland, which emerged as Gurlitt’s sole heir when he died of heart failure in 2014. A German court overruled a challenge to the will by a relative, and works from the collection are now being exhibited in Bern and at a museum in Bonn, with a full explanation of the history of the collection.

Philip Mould, an art expert and co-presenter of the programme, said the drawing was a fascinating early work by Moore. “Not only do we now know it is totally genuine, but it has been cleansed of the evil prospect that it was looted Nazi art, which will allow Bern to once again display it to the public.”
... ... ...

Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Sep, 2018 07:46 am
@Walter Hinteler,
The art collection of Cornelius Gurlitt, controversial because of its Nazi past, can now be seen in Berlin for the first time in a complete overview.
After two solo exhibitions in Bern and Bonn, the Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin will offer a look at both the Nazi action "Degenerate Art" and the Nazi art theft.

Gropius Bau - Gurlitt: Status Report
Quote:
News that the Bavarian Public Prosecutor’s office had seized the art collection of Cornelius Gurlitt (1932–2014), caused a national and international sensation when it was made public in November 2013. The 1500 works the reclusive son of the art dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt (1895–1956) had inherited from his father raised suspicions: had they been looted by the Nazis before and during the Second World War?

To investigate these suspicions and to study the cache, the German government provided funding to establish an international team of experts, the Schwabing Art Trove Taskforce. Cornelius Gurlitt agreed to restitute any work identified as expropriated unlawfully. Thus far, four such works have been returned to the heirs of their rightful owners.

In the exhibition at the Gropius Bau, the Bundeskunsthalle Bonn and the Kunstmuseum Bern present some 200 works from the Gurlitt estate and a wide range of original documents and historical photographs. The exhibition traces the twists and turns of Hildebrand Gurlitt’s career: from passionate champion of Modernism to participant in and beneficiary of the Aktion Entartete Kunst and, finally, - despite a Jewish grandmother – to head buyer for Hitler’s planned Führer Museum in Linz.

That notwithstanding, after the end of the war, he was able to resume his pre-war career as museum director without too much trouble. Complementing Gurlitt’s ambiguous biography, the exhibition sheds light on the lives of some of his contemporaries, focusing on the fate of Jewish artists, collectors and art dealers who fell victim to the Nazi regime.

Spanning a wide range of eras and styles – from Dürer to Monet and from Cranach to Kirchner and Rodin – the exhibition presents works that have been hidden from public view for decades and provides an insight into the current state of the investigation of the Gurlitt trove. By tracing the provenance of each of the works on show, the exhibition also sheds light on the complex history of the individual objects. Many of them were seized as ‘degenerate’ from German museums in 1937, others may have been unlawfully expropriated from their owners. For a great number of works, the provenance is likely to remain unclear because conclusive documents are lost or because the dealers involved made sure to cover their tracks.
0 Replies
 
 

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