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It’s not really a Gay gesture

 
 
jcboy
 
Reply Thu 10 May, 2012 07:15 pm
While going through some of my parent’s things I found this old painting. I had forgotten all about it. I showed it to a friend of mine and he said that’s so Gay!

Of course there are definitely gay gestures and codes, but this pose wasn’t one of them.

My father once told me what this actual pose meant but I don’t recall at the moment. Perhaps someone on here might know.

http://desmond.imageshack.us/Himg189/scaled.php?server=189&filename=gaycv.jpg&res=landing
 
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 May, 2012 07:18 pm
@jcboy,
the hand, or the rakish sword on the thrust hip...?
jcboy
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 May, 2012 07:19 pm
@Rockhead,
hehe the hand gesture Smile
EqualityFLSTPete
 
  2  
Reply Thu 10 May, 2012 07:36 pm
@jcboy,
I never said it was a gay gesture, I said you were,
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 May, 2012 08:23 pm
@jcboy,
Pointing towards the future? A kind of optimistic Enlightenment gesture?
dlowan
 
  2  
Reply Thu 10 May, 2012 08:24 pm
@EqualityFLSTPete,
EqualityFLSTPete wrote:

I never said it was a gay gesture, I said you were,


I don't think a person can actually BE a gesture, can they?
0 Replies
 
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 May, 2012 08:54 pm
@dlowan,
Yeah, it kind of says , "Behold!"
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 May, 2012 10:19 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
I'm betwixt by the tassel.
0 Replies
 
oolongteasup
 
  3  
Reply Thu 10 May, 2012 10:21 pm
@jcboy,
As the sort of foppish popinjay familiar with the quips and quirks that a young coxcomb such as you can but aspire to I assure you the gesticulation proffers a seat at the table.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 May, 2012 02:29 am
@Lustig Andrei,
There are a bunch of paintings of William Penn with gestures similar to these. One of the paintings commemorates a land acquisition pact the Penn made with the indians which led to a "land Grab" that became known as the "Walking Purchase" Penn was shown holding a scroll in one hand and gesturing to the "savages" in a manner similar to this guy.

This painting attempts to commemorate the military cooking life of whoever the guy is. He is obviously a member of the fourth chefs squadron of the Royal Fusileers. His gesture is meant to show the proper way to hold a spatula
Nevertheless, Im always amazed at how boyish many of these subjects were made to look on canvas

Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 May, 2012 02:35 am
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:
This painting attempts to commemorate the military life of whoever the guy is. Im always amazed at how boyish many of these subjects were made to look on canvas


Many of these subjects were nothing more than boys. Remember, life expactancy was way, way lower back in those days than today. Teen-aged popinjays commanded mature men in battle. They were officers by the time they started to have to shave because they were "nobly born." The men they commanded were essentially chattel, landless farm boys. Just like today, soldiers were mainly kids.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 May, 2012 03:23 am
Tempest in a teapot . . . two things are very difficult in portraitue: drapery (meaning how fabrics hang) and depicting the articulation of the bones of the hand. Look at the subject's right hand. In both that case, and in the gesture of the left hand, the artist is showing his mastery of his art. That's all, nothing more.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 May, 2012 03:38 am
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_FrU7YkCzKcw/TBReUvgznOI/AAAAAAAAABk/igW_R6B2LgY/s1600/nelson.jpg

In this portrait of Horatio Nelson when he was about 21, the artist shows both hands articulated. (Later portraits don't because he no longer had two hands.)

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_NGTgrdVoV8w/TUMask6W-pI/AAAAAAAACWQ/aAwp8rM-7cw/s1600/napoleon.jpg

In this early portrait of Napoleon, the artist is showing off. One hand is in a gauntlet, but the other is bare, and articulated. In addition, the artists shows that ridiculous cloak blowing around him, so he can show off his mastery of drapery.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 May, 2012 04:22 am
@jcboy,
Not sure if this is that relevant, but I think it's Bonnie Prince Charlie.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/2/2d/Carlos_Eduardo_Stuart_Infante_de_Anglais.jpg/220px-Carlos_Eduardo_Stuart_Infante_de_Anglais.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Edward_Stuart

Hopes of a Jacobean/Catholic king were dashed with his defeat at Culloden, maybe the painting is trying to show that sense of loss.

These are just suggestions I can't really be certain it is him.
0 Replies
 
Sloan
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 May, 2012 05:01 am
Interesting, I always thought in those days when a man posed with the palm of his hand up was to show wealth, his hands had never done hard labor, something to that effect.
0 Replies
 
jcboy
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 May, 2012 04:14 pm
@oolongteasup,
That’s what I remember now, a seat to the table! Thank you

And Izzy he does kind of look like Bonnie Prince Charlie.

I also have the portrait of Napoleon, have that one in my living room but thinking of getting rid of it, it’s a large painting and a little too big for the wall I have it on. I think it would be perfect to donate to the next silent auction for the next breast cancer fund raiser!

http://desmond.imageshack.us/Himg137/scaled.php?server=137&filename=picdo.jpg&res=landing
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 May, 2012 05:12 pm
@jcboy,
Cool gryphon!
jcboy
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 May, 2012 05:19 pm
@dlowan,
Thanks! He weighs about 300lbs. When I moved to Florida my neighbor actually built a wooden crate for him so the movers wouldn’t damage him, he made the trip unscratched!

I call him Merv Cool
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 May, 2012 05:23 pm
@jcboy,
Very clever.
0 Replies
 
 

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