5
   

I will beat you to it.

 
 
SMickey
 
Reply Sun 28 Jul, 2013 07:08 pm
I'm a S. Korean who is studying English watching soap dramas.

This is part of the sitcom Friends.

A guy named Ross is looking around a room where he might be living in soon.
His friend, Pheobe, likes the room much and suggest him he get the room, saying

"You better hurry up and fill out an application, or I'm gonna beat you to it."

What did she mean by "beat you to it" ?
Did she say she would hit him until he does what she told him to?
I can sense that she is urging him strongly to get the room.
But what is the exact meaning of 'beat someone to it'?
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Type: Question • Score: 5 • Views: 1,133 • Replies: 11

 
View best answer, chosen by SMickey
edgarblythe
  Selected Answer
 
  3  
Reply Sun 28 Jul, 2013 07:47 pm
@SMickey,
In American English "beat you to it" means, in this case, she will take the room for herself if he hesitates too long.
trying2learn
 
  0  
Reply Sun 28 Jul, 2013 09:16 pm
@edgarblythe,
You are right. Don't ever say something like that in a deposition.
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Jul, 2013 11:57 pm
@trying2learn,

Yes. Look for all the meanings of "beat" in your dictionary.

"I will beat you to it" means "I will do it before you ".
SMickey
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Jul, 2013 01:30 am
@edgarblythe,
Thank you for the tip.
0 Replies
 
SMickey
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Jul, 2013 01:31 am
@trying2learn,
Do you mind if I ask you what is 'in a deposition.'?
SMickey
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Jul, 2013 01:31 am
@McTag,
Thank you. Now it's crystal-clear to me.
0 Replies
 
engineer
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Jul, 2013 05:17 am
@SMickey,
A deposition is a legal statement to a court and that poster was joking with you.
trying2learn
 
  1  
Reply Thu 1 Aug, 2013 02:31 am
@engineer,
No I wasn't joking. If people are going to learn English then they should realize the different meanings words can have depending on the circumstances.

The main reason I even made that post is because it happened to me irl and I was caught off guard.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Thu 1 Aug, 2013 03:18 pm
@trying2learn,
That's right, they want it to be the dog's bollocks.
trying2learn
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 Aug, 2013 11:49 pm
@izzythepush,
I don't know what this means"dog's bollocks". I was only trying to point out that there is a difference between American English and British English and the context.
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Sat 10 Aug, 2013 12:23 am
@trying2learn,
Some things it's better not to know.
0 Replies
 
 

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