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The benefits of honey

 
 
Sat 29 Jun, 2013 03:46 am
Hi Health Experts,
my brother has just spent a lot of money to buy honey because honey is said to be good for health. Is it true?
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Type: Question • Score: 10 • Views: 1,801 • Replies: 19
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View best answer, chosen by Loh Jane
Setanta
  Selected Answer
 
  2  
Sat 29 Jun, 2013 04:23 am
That's a tough question. Honey, like granulated "table" sugar, contains glucose and fructose, although it is higher in fructose. In granulated sugar, the glucose and fructose have been combined--in honey they are seperate. For that reason, granulated sugar may convert more readily to fat than honey--but i don't think that all nutritionists agree with that. With a higher fructose content, honey tastes sweeter, and so one may use less of it. It's higher in caloric content than table sugar, so using less works out to about the same number of calories for each. Finally, some foodies claim that local honey, honey which was made by bees in your area and from local flowers, contains pollen from those local flowers, and that your body will, therefore, become accustomed to those pollens, reducing the impact of "hay fever," a histamine reaction to pollen. I don't know if that's true or not.

On the whole, there's little to choose between table sugar and honey, and claims made for the health benefits of honey are not proven, as far as i know. If someone likes the taste of honey, then i don't think it does them any harm to substitute honey for sugar.
laughoutlood
 
  1  
Sat 29 Jun, 2013 05:32 am
@Loh Jane,
Hive no idea, I'm just glad you've outed yourself honey.
0 Replies
 
Loh Jane
 
  1  
Sat 29 Jun, 2013 06:12 am
@Setanta,
Hi Sentanta,
thanks for your information.
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  1  
Sat 29 Jun, 2013 10:44 am
@Loh Jane,
Thanks to Set for an objective reply

Everyday is revealed the benefits of some obscure compound. My theory Jane: Surely honey must contain trace chems the body needs

Of course by the same token it could be poisonous. However using it liberally in my coffee every morn and in the best of health at 82…..
Loh Jane
 
  1  
Sat 29 Jun, 2013 09:42 pm
@dalehileman,
Hi dal,
It is really difficult to believe. I will tell my parents to consume more honey from today on. May I ask what else you consume?
farmerman
 
  1  
Sat 29 Jun, 2013 11:23 pm
@Loh Jane,
Honey, like sucrose is a disaccharide mae of two simple sugars. However, because it is a liquid that "ripens" in a sealed comb, honey can pick up C botulinum spores. Much honey is pasteurized these days but, as set said, the sugar is not a covalent linked compound , its a loose bond, the pasteruiing often messes the flavor and the subtle florl notes are lost by pasteurizing.
The C botulinum spores have never yielded evidence of toxins in lab studies but since "crib deaths" have not eliminated raw honey as a suspected cause, The Pediatrics Societoes recommend that honey (raw) not be fed to kids under a certain age.

We raised bees since I was a small kid and when I was 8 or 10, I would don my little bee bonnet and steal some combs from a working hive and wed go off into the fields and eat the raw unripe honey like candy. I have not, to this date, had anything that approached botulism so I wonder about whether the tox science has anything going for it

Heres an article from U of Fla
Quote:

Malcolm T. Sanford, Eddie Atkinson, Jeanette Klopchin, and Jamie Ellis2

Medical research has led doctors to suspect that one possible cause of so-called "crib death" or "sudden infant death syndrome" (SIDS) may be infant botulism (food poisoning). Infant botulism is a rare disease (fewer than 100 reported cases per year in the U.S.) which can lead to varying degrees of paralysis. Public health officials believe honey may be a potential source of infant botulism. The Infectious Disease Section and Microbial Diseases Laboratory of the California Department of Health have provided evidence that botulism spores in the immature infant intestinal tract may produce the actively growing stage of the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. The bacterium, in turn, manufactures a poison that can block nerve impulse transmissions. Healthy adults and children over one year of age have a more mature digestive system that prevents the Clostridium bacteria from surviving.

Botulism spores are found many places in nature. These include in water, soil, dust, improperly processed foods, and even air. The spores are not harmful themselves, but in the absence of oxygen they germinate and the resultant bacteria produce a powerful toxin. This is the reason canned vegetables are heated prior to packing. Bacterial spores in food are destroyed by high temperatures obtained only in the pressure canner (240-250°F). More than 6 hours is needed to kill the spores at boiling temperature (212°F). The toxin is destroyed by heating to 176°F or boiling for 10 minutes to 20 minutes.

Raw agricultural crops, however, are never heated. Many foods, even if heated or processed, once exposed to the air would be susceptible to re-infestation by botulism spores. Cumulative research on infant botulism to date, therefore, suggests that there is an unknown risk factor in feeding any raw agricultural product, including honey, to infants under one year of age.

In a survey of honey in the United States, 10% of honey samples contained botulism spores, and other data suggest an association between honey consumption and infant botulism. That said, botulism toxin has not been found in honey, nor would it be expected to be produced there due to honey's osmotic concentrations. Since honey is a potential and avoidable source of C. botulinum spores, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), and the National Honey Board (NHB) recommend that honey not be given to infants younger than 12 months of age.
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Loh Jane
 
  1  
Sun 30 Jun, 2013 02:41 am
Hi all,
I cannot understand why I shouldn't mix honey with hot water to drink and why I oughtn't to use a metal spoon to get honey. Do you all know?
Setanta
 
  1  
Sun 30 Jun, 2013 04:57 am
I've never heard either of those things. Where did you hear them?
Setanta
 
  2  
Sun 30 Jun, 2013 05:06 am
There was an interesting article in the NEJM in the early 1970s. It reported on emergency room treatments for alcohol induced toxic shock. The standard treatment of the time included an IV of D5W--dextrose 5% in water. The study reported on the use of F5W--fructose 5% in water. The effects were said to be a dramatic improvement which in the long run was less unpleasant for the patient.

The doctor who told us about this was on ER duty a few nights later. (The local outpatient clinic provided ER doctors on a rotation.) The police brought in this joker who had been found "dead" drunk, passed out in the street. The guy was a monster--well over 300 pounds. We strapped him to a table and one of the treatment routines was an F5W IV. The guy came around in about 20 minutes and the doctor (a large man) and i had all we could do to hold him down--he almost ripped the straps off the table. About a half an hour later, although nauseous, he resembled a human being, and was coherent.

On the basis of that experience, i would recommend honey as a hang-over dure.
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  1  
Sun 30 Jun, 2013 10:38 am
@Loh Jane,
Quote:
May I ask what else you consume?
Jane you certainly may. But it's a long list so, in regard to what sorts of intake
roger
 
  1  
Sun 30 Jun, 2013 12:20 pm
@Setanta,
That's nothing. I once read a small book on the benefits of drinking a mixture of honey and apple cider vinegar. I forget what all it was supposed to do for you, but it didn't.
Loh Jane
 
  1  
Mon 1 Jul, 2013 05:40 am
@Setanta,
Hi Setanta,
the salesman told us not to use a metal spoon and not to mix the honey with hot water.
0 Replies
 
Loh Jane
 
  1  
Mon 1 Jul, 2013 05:43 am
@dalehileman,
I am really astonished that you have such a good writing skill at this age.
Loh Jane
 
  1  
Mon 1 Jul, 2013 05:44 am
@roger,
Good evening roger.
0 Replies
 
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Mon 1 Jul, 2013 05:44 am
@roger,
I read that book and it did it for me.

Twice.
roger
 
  1  
Mon 1 Jul, 2013 09:17 am
@Lordyaswas,
Read it twice (which I doubt), or tried it twice?
dalehileman
 
  1  
Mon 1 Jul, 2013 10:14 am
@Loh Jane,
Quote:
I am really astonished that you have such a good writing skill at this age.
Why thank you Jane, I'm flattered, while you've made my entire day
0 Replies
 
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Mon 1 Jul, 2013 02:12 pm
@roger,
I can't remember. All I know is that is that it occurred more than once.

0 Replies
 
phiferindia
 
  0  
Mon 8 Jul, 2013 01:18 am
@Loh Jane,
I could help you Loh Jane, mixing honey with hot water to drink is good for weight loss treatment. Its a home remedy to weight loss. You can follow this regulary especially at morning in empty stomach. This will burns or solutes unwanted colestrol and fats. So thats why this will be taken by this way. Hope you now understood why mixture of honey and hotwater should drink.
0 Replies
 
 

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