13
   

How much of emotional influence do accents have on people's perception of one another?

 
 
IRFRANK
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Jun, 2013 05:04 pm
@Fil Albuquerque,
But how do we decide if the situation is good or bad? Our perceptions of the new influence is based upon what? We make judgments, the question is how accurate or justified they are. When faced with a new input (person) we are forced to consider change. Fight or flight might be too extreme, but still there are decisions.
Fil Albuquerque
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Jun, 2013 05:19 pm
@IRFRANK,
It is clear that we have pre concepts towards strangers in terms of response I don't see any other characteristic more significant then suspicion or caution as normal expectable behaviour...we will interact and be receptive to the extent we normally are with guests, if anything a false or perhaps more adequately forced sympathy would be the most common response I deduce plausible or reasonable...
hamburgboy
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Jun, 2013 07:23 pm
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote :

Quote:
Y0u've got a Gaul to say that . . .


are you saying Walter has a " Horse " = ein Pferd = ein GAUL ?
0 Replies
 
IRFRANK
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Jun, 2013 06:25 pm
@Fil Albuquerque,
Maybe for a reasonable person. Many people aren't. Their emotional instincts lead to irrational behavior.
0 Replies
 
Ashhsays
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Jun, 2013 03:52 am
@Manke Nelis,
accent can be changed just by simple efforts..
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Jun, 2013 08:43 am
If The Bowery Boys movies were still available to see on tv, I believe, this thread would not have been started. The answer is obvious.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Jun, 2013 08:59 am
@Foofie,
You really think that they were shown on Dutch tv?
izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Thu 13 Jun, 2013 11:05 am
@Walter Hinteler,
I doubt it, I've never heard of them and we get more American telly.
contrex
 
  2  
Reply Thu 13 Jun, 2013 12:32 pm
@izzythepush,
izzythepush wrote:

I doubt it, I've never heard of them and we get more American telly.


The Bowery Boys series were movies, not a TV series. They were fictional New York City characters who were the subject of 48 (yes!) films released from 1946 to 1958. I have a feeling that they probably didn't travel well. The humour was sort of Three Stooges/Abbott & Costello type. Actually reading plot resumes they sound like a lot of fun.

Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Jun, 2013 08:57 am
@contrex,
contrex wrote:

izzythepush wrote:

I doubt it, I've never heard of them and we get more American telly.


The Bowery Boys series were movies, not a TV series. They were fictional New York City characters who were the subject of 48 (yes!) films released from 1946 to 1958. I have a feeling that they probably didn't travel well. The humour was sort of Three Stooges/Abbott & Costello type. Actually reading plot resumes they sound like a lot of fun.




Yes. They mimicked the early 20th century New Yorkese, when New York's five boroughs had a larger working class demographic of white, blue-collar types. I don't remember if they spoke with the classic early 20th century New Yorkese, or perhaps, Brooklynese, "dees, dem and dose" ("these, them and those" - the Irish didn't pronouce "th's," as I've read was the origin of that speech), they seemed quite comfortable with their speech. The comical effect was Mugs McGuinnes, I think (I forgot the actor's name) who was known as Mr. Malaprop by the media, since he used five dollar words incorrectly.

Many younger New Yorkers have interestingly lost any New Yorkese, other than pronouncing New Yawk, instead of New York, or "idear," instead of "idea." However, if the young person identifies with being upwardly mobile in the future, some are affecting a manner of speech that sounds sort of New England WASP, in my opinion. Perhaps, all part of the more fluid social mobility in the U.S.? Even ethnics might sound like news anchors with a non-regional, non-accent (news presenters).

Only in NYC and Philidelphia, I believe, natives to the cities pronounce "coffee'' as "coughee," and "water" as "warta." Elsewhere, water is "wahter," and coffee is "kaffee."

P.S.: I was too young to see the original films in the theater. The films were shown on tv for many years, they were so popular. The films during WWII reflected the supposed willingness of many to join the military, as the Bowery Boys were eager to enlist, in one film I remember.


0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Jun, 2013 09:04 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:

You really think that they were shown on Dutch tv?


Dutch? Why Dutch? Building a dyke?
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Fri 14 Jun, 2013 09:53 am
@Foofie,
Foofie wrote:
Dutch? Why Dutch? Building a dyke?
Manke Nelis, the person who asked the question, is Dutch (at least that what he/she wrote when starting this thread).
He didn't want to built a dyke as far as I understood the question.
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Jun, 2013 11:12 am
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/261458.php

Would this misconception correlate to regional/social status accent?
0 Replies
 
 

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