11
   

News Flash! Boomers Did A Horrible Job Raising Kids

 
 
Reply Thu 2 May, 2013 07:22 pm
Quote:
Today’s teenagers are more materialistic and less interested in working hard than the baby boomers were in their teens, according to a new study. But sorry, boomers, the researchers say it’s probably your fault for creating a culture that breeds narcissism and entitlement.
“You’re taught what’s important and how to act by your parents, the media and those around you,” said Jean Twenge, a co-author of the study and professor of psychology at San Diego State University. “It’s the cultural changes that are really bringing these changes.”
It’s not just millennials who are materialistic, according to the study published Wednesday in the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. The money-hungriness actually peaked with Generation X and has declined somewhat since then.
Among high school seniors, the need for money was highest around the end of the 1980s. For a cultural reference point, think 1987’s “Wall Street,” which put the phrase “greed is good” into pop culture.
And while GenY is less money-focused than the Gen Xers (but more so than the boomers) they are also the least willing to work hard, according to the research.
In the “don’t want to work hard” category, high schoolers in the mid-1970s agreed 25 percent of the time; in the late-80s that climbed to 30 percent; and by the mid-2000s it was up to 39 percent.
While the teens are now more likely than boomers to want a vacation home, there is a “growing disconnect between their willingness to do the work to pay for these things,” said Twenge, who is also the author of “Generation Me: Why Today's Young Americans Are More Confident, Assertive, Entitled -- and More Miserable Than Ever Before.”
The study makes a case for the high schoolers’ attitudes being a product of the times they grew up in. (This is where the blame gets passed to the older generations.) Growing up, the teens' values are influenced by the dominant social ideologies, family structures, economic situations, media, political and business messages, the researchers argue.
The research analyzed by Twenge and psychology professor Tim Kasser has been collected in Monitoring the Future surveys with U.S. high school 12th graders every year since 1976. For this study, the researchers did not examine data past 2007, though data are collected annually.
The study defines baby boomers as those born roughly 1946 to 1964; Generation X as those born 1965 to 1981; and Gen Y (known as the Millennials) as those born 1982 to 1999.
http://lifeinc.today.com/_news/2013/05/02/18003987-todays-teens-more-materialistic-less-likely-to-work-hard-study-says?lite

What we increasingly have in our young is lazy entitled twits.

This is not a good thing.
 
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Thu 2 May, 2013 07:25 pm
@hawkeye10,
How do boomers come into this? they're the grandparents of today's teens, not their parents.
hawkeye10
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 2 May, 2013 07:54 pm
@ehBeth,
ehBeth wrote:

How do boomers come into this? they're the grandparents of today's teens, not their parents.

I am a boomer and in 2005 when this study was done my oldest was at the right age for this study...the other two too young. you seem some how confused.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 May, 2013 07:56 pm
@hawkeye10,
I guess you're quite a bit older than I thought.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 May, 2013 08:04 pm
@ehBeth,
I preceded the boomers by about a year. He is old.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Fri 3 May, 2013 03:37 am
Is it any wonder that i call this joker Chicken Little?
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  0  
Reply Fri 3 May, 2013 07:37 am
@hawkeye10,
I tend to see society as the primary molding force of individuals, not their parents, even though we have internalized certain values that were instilled in us by parents by an early age.

Regardless, I do remember some news blurb that claimed that one's peers (of one's children) have more of an effect on many children's values, oftentimes, more than parents. Well, to counter that, we might then have to have a country of home-schooled children, and everyone spends time each day reading the bible as a family activity?

It has been said that the middle class are the people that maintain the most stringent ideals of proper behavior, the lower and upper classes having a looser grip on proper behavior, supposedly. If that has any truth, then with a shrinking middle class, the current situation is just doing the math.

I also wonder if fewer individuals have a moral compass these days? And, does it work slightly askew from prior generations? Also, let's not forget in the 20th century two world wars were fought due to nations showing a belligerency based on believing they deserved their rightful place in the sun, so to speak. Certain English speaking nations, including the U.S., might have an orientation to the world that allows for a diverse participation in all goodies in society. That in itself, I believe, sets some apart from others, who are insular in their orientation.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 May, 2013 07:37 am
@hawkeye10,
The whole definition of work has changed during these kids life. They saw a lot of people getting very rich while seemingly doing very little. That has to change the way they think about work, especially hard work.

They might be more narcissistic because they are absolutely flooded with images. Cameras are everywhere. They're encouraged to share photos of themselves. I recall some article about Facebook angst/ennui because kids were seeing so many pictures of beautiful people having fun.

And kids are slammed with more marketing images than ever before -- targeted marketing. When you're bombarded with images of things you "need", sure you're going to be more materialistic.

If parents are doing a terrible job it's probably because they were slower to adapt or even recognize these changes.
hawkeye10
 
  -2  
Reply Fri 3 May, 2013 10:05 am
@boomerang,
Quote:
The whole definition of work has changed during these kids life. They saw a lot of people getting very rich while seemingly doing very little. That has to change the way they think about work, especially hard work.

i decided around 1984 that I did not want to devote my life to a corporation because I was talking to too many old guys who had done that who decided that their loyalty was not returned or rewarded. i think maybe this practical planning may be expanded to the whole idea of having a career now that this economic system is circling the toilet bowl. but why are youth seemingly unwilling to do any work? this would be a failure of parenting.

Quote:
They might be more narcissistic because they are absolutely flooded with images. Cameras are everywhere. They're encouraged to share photos of themselves. I recall some article about Facebook angst/ennui because kids were seeing so many pictures of beautiful people having fun

many have argued that narcissism is the expected end result of capitalism run amuck, but if out of control capitalism formed these people then their parents abdicated their duty to apply a counter force. I am already convinced that fathers have largely abdicated their duties and stayed silent as the women raise the kids....this was a bad idea.

Quote:
And kids are slammed with more marketing images than ever before -- targeted marketing. When you're bombarded with images of things you "need", sure you're going to be more materialistic.
aka propaganda for capitalism and the corporate class. this used to be balanced by other messages from the school, from church, and from home. not so much anymore I think

Quote:
If parents are doing a terrible job it's probably because they were slower to adapt or even recognize these changes.
or they spent way too much of their energy worrying about "SAFETY!"......
hawkeye10
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 3 May, 2013 10:23 am
@hawkeye10,
I think that parents are the major problem..."raising self esteem" became teaching the indulgence of fantasy and "SAFETY!" became the excuse to not prepare these people to live in the real world....to not teach them the tools that would be useful if they should ever need to leave the parental cocoon.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  2  
Reply Fri 3 May, 2013 01:38 pm
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
but why are youth seemingly unwilling to do any work?


I remember seeing something a while back -- a recent graduate wrote "all my life I've been told that if I don't go to college the only job I'd ever find is flipping burgers. Now I've got my degree and can't find a job so everyone says I'm lazy because I don't want to go flip burgers."

I think kids WANT jobs.

My kid would drop out of school this very minute if he could get a job.

Quote:
I am already convinced that fathers have largely abdicated their duties and stayed silent as the women raise the kids.


From what I see, fathers are doing a much better job at parenting than they have over the last 50 years. When I was a kid it wasn't uncommon for them to just walk out on their families and I only knew one single dad. Now I know several single dads and quite a few stay at home fathers. I'm not sure what this has to do with capitalism.

Quote:
propaganda for capitalism and the corporate class. this used to be balanced by other messages from the school, from church, and from home.


Agreed. But don't look towards schools to provide this. Did you read about the new standardized test that has plugs for Lego and Mug Root Beer (including their logos)? Company's are vying for space in schools and paying a lot of money for the privilege of having such a captive audience.

I agree that we spend too much time worried about the wrong things.
hawkeye10
 
  -2  
Reply Fri 3 May, 2013 03:21 pm
@boomerang,
My 23 year old is working her ass off and is moving up rapidly at Microsoft..she tells me that this makes her odd...everyone else her age is either whining or is coasting at the earliest opportunity.

And don't get me started on my adventure of finding employees. .I need smart and not affraid of work and non trouble makers...they are very hard to find. Only 1 of 5 of my hires have been good enough to work for me, and I have hired only the best on paper 1 of 40 or 50.
hawkeye10
 
  -2  
Reply Fri 3 May, 2013 03:59 pm
@hawkeye10,
And older people bouncing around this industry are useless..I have hired 17 to 52 years old but the oldest to work out even a short time was 27. The sweet spot has been 20-24 years old...good people with little training who can't find any work who are so very greatful to get hired on to a well run successful restaurant were the employees are quality people and the tips are outstanding. These people work their asses off for my place, and stay out of trouble.
RABEL222
 
  2  
Reply Fri 3 May, 2013 09:45 pm
@hawkeye10,
I bet you pay these "grateful" employees less than minimum wage by making them share their tips with you.
hawkeye10
 
  -2  
Reply Fri 3 May, 2013 10:50 pm
@RABEL222,
RABEL222 wrote:

I bet you pay these "grateful" employees less than minimum wage by making them share their tips with you.


that would not inspire loyal greatful employees. I am known as a great boss for reasons. besides you are an idiot, in my state wait staff gets the whole $9.19/hr PLUS their tips. my lowest paid employees now make on average $13 an hour....PLUS they work in a place that is considered cool by people they meet. when we are depressed all we need to do is walk around town in our uniforms and listen to people tell us how much they love us.

plus all but one of my employees was going nowhere when I picked them up, and not one of them would tell you that that they have ever had a better job than working for me.
boomerang
 
  2  
Reply Fri 3 May, 2013 10:57 pm
@RABEL222,
Even if you don't like hawkeye that's kind of a shitty thing to say.

hawkeye10
 
  -2  
Reply Fri 3 May, 2013 11:02 pm
@boomerang,
boomerang wrote:

Even if you don't like hawkeye that's kind of a shitty thing to say.



and very off topic. but on topic is that there are some awesome 20-24 yo's out there who cant get to college and who have not been able to land a decent job much less a start of a career who will work their butts off for you if you can find them and offer them something worth buying into.
0 Replies
 
RABEL222
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 May, 2013 09:35 am
@boomerang,
I dont know where Hawk has his restaurant but in this area restaurants include tips in employees pay so they can increase their bottom line. Thats why I give cash to the worker in the hope that they can keep it. Sorry if you thought I was being a jerk but I am pointing out something that goes on around here according to waitresses I know.
0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  2  
Reply Sat 4 May, 2013 11:38 am
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
News Flash! Boomers Did A Horrible Job Raising Kids

No, the author of the study you are citing is not blaming boomer parents, or their child-rearing techniques, for his finding that, "Today’s teenagers are more materialistic and less interested in working hard than the baby boomers were in their teens." She's saying that these teens are "a product of the times they grew up in, " meaning they have been influenced by a culture that's been shaped by more than just their parents, or their parents' generation.

Quote:
The study makes a case for the high schoolers’ attitudes being a product of the times they grew up in. (This is where the blame gets passed to the older generations.) Growing up, the teens' values are influenced by the dominant social ideologies, family structures, economic situations, media, political and business messages, the researchers argue.


Also, this "study" is apparently based on 12th graders responses to a questionnaire, one ostensibly designed to measure attitudes. But do these attitudes reflect actual behaviors? Are more teens in this generation actually unwilling to work hard as adults, or unwilling to work as hard as previous generations, or is this, for whatever reason, just their transient attitude while in high school? And, what exactly, does "work hard" mean to these teens? Put in long hours? Do physically demanding work? Work for little pay?
And, if these teens aren't already working hard in the 12th grade--working to get good grades, working to get into a good college, working to play well at a sport or on a team, or to do well at another activity, or just working to get that high school diploma---if they aren't already"working" to achieve something that requires determination and effort, and persistence, by the time they're in the 12th grade, I'd hardly lay the blame for that exclusively on their parents.

When were teens not enmeshed in "a culture that breeds narcissism and entitlement"--that's almost the very definition of teen culture, the psychological world teens live in. Adolescents do tend to be narcissistic and to have a sense of entitlement, it's almost part and parcel of that stage of development, and it's not exclusively due to the culture of the times, it's part of that phase of life.
Quote:

What we increasingly have in our young is lazy entitled twits.

Where does that article, or the author of that study, even imply that?

We are also talking about a generation that grew up in a culture which was increasingly shaped and dominated by electronic media--mainly computers and digital devices--in addition to TV-- media which transmit hefty materialistic messages, both overt and covert, and media which delivers all sorts of instant gratifications to relatively passive users/consumers with very little "hard work" on their part. Should boomer parents not have bought their children those PC's or video games or TVs for their bedrooms? Is that where they did "a horrible job of raising kids"?

There is nothing inherently wrong with being materialistic, particularly in the context of other values--that's part of how we define a "good life" in a capitalistic culture, by our material goods and possessions. And teens who want the goodies, without having to work for them, will get a rude awakening once they are adults--there is no free lunch. Whether motivated by ambition, or pride, or a need for personal fulfillment, most people do develop the capacity to work for what they want, and to adjust their expectations to what they can afford, and that will be true of this generation as well. And even those raised on a heavy dose of individualism, will find that there is often a need to be a team player in order to succeed.

It is also important to note that others in the field do not agree with Twenge or her conclusions.
Quote:
“There’s a self-fulfilling prophecy,” said Kali H. Trzesniewski, an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Western Ontario. Ms. Trzesniewski, along with colleagues at the University of California, Davis, and Michigan State University, will publish research in the journal Psychological Science next month showing there have been very few changes in the thoughts, feelings and behaviors of youth over the last 30 years. In other words, the minute-by-minute Twitter broadcasts of today are the navel-gazing est seminars of 1978.

Ms. Trzesniewski said her study is a response to widely publicized research by Jean Twenge, an associate professor of psychology at San Diego State University, who along with colleagues has found that narcissism is much more prevalent among people born in the 1980s than in earlier generations. Ms. Twenge’s book title summarizes the research: “Generation Me: Why Today’s Young Americans Are More Confident, Assertive, Entitled — and More Miserable Than Ever Before” (2006, Free Press)...

However, some scholars argue that a spike in selfishness among young people is, like the story of Narcissus, a myth.

“It’s like a cottage industry of putting them down and complaining about them and whining about why they don’t grow up,” said Jeffrey Jensen Arnett, a developmental psychologist, referring to young Americans. Mr. Arnett, the author of “Emerging Adulthood: The Winding Road From the Late Teens through the Twenties” (2004, Oxford University Press), has written a critique of Ms. Twenge’s book, which is to be published in the American Journal of Psychology.

Scholars including Mr. Arnett suggest several reasons why the young may be perceived as having increased narcissistic traits. These include the personal biases of older adults, the lack of nuance in the Narcissistic Personality Inventory, changing social norms, the news media’s emphasis on celebrity, and the rise of social networking sites that encourage egocentricity.

Richard P. Eibach, an assistant professor of psychology at Yale, has found that exaggerated beliefs in social decline are widespread — largely because people tend to mistake changes in themselves for changes in the external world. “Our automatic assumption is something real has changed,” Mr. Eibach said. “It takes extra thought to realize that something about your own perspective or the information you’re receiving may have changed.”

Ms. Trzesniewski gave as an example of this bias a scene from the film “Knocked Up,” in which new parents drive their baby home from the hospital at a snail’s pace. The road, of course, is no more or less dangerous than before the couple became mother and father. But once they make that life transition, they perceive the journey as perilous.

Indeed, the transition to parenthood, increased responsibility and physical aging are examples of changes in individuals that tend to be the real sources of people’s perceptions of the moral decline of others, write Mr. Eibach and Lisa K. Libby of Ohio State University in a psychology book chapter exploring the “ideology of the Good Old Days,” to be published by Oxford University Press later this year. (They also report that perceptions of social decline tend to be associated with conservative attitudes.)

Ms. Twenge and Ms. Trzesniewski used the inventory in their studies, though they chose different data sets and had opposite conclusions. Each said their data sets were better than the other’s for a host of reasons — all good, but far too long to list here. Ms. Twenge, who has read Ms. Trzesniewski’s critique, said she stands by her own nationwide analysis and has a comprehensive response, along with another paper, forthcoming in the Journal of Personality. It reads in part, “their critique ultimately strengthens our case that narcissism has risen over the generations among college students.”

Mr. Arnett dismisses tests like the inventory. “They have very limited validity,” he said. “They don’t really get at the complexity of peoples’ personality.” Some of the test choices (“I see myself as a good leader”) “sound like pretty normal personality features,” he said...

Test or no test, Mr. Arnett worries that “youth bashing” has become so common that accomplishments tend to be forgotten, like the fact that young people today have a closer relationship with their parents than existed between children and their parents in the 1960s (“They really understand things from their parents’ perspective,” Mr. Arnett said), or that they popularized the alternative spring break in which a student opts to spend a vacation helping people in a third world country instead of chugging 40s in Cancún.

“It’s the development of a new life stage between adolescence and adulthood,” Mr. Arnett said. “It’s a temporary condition of being self-focused, not a permanent generational characteristic.”
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/17/fashion/17narcissism.html?pagewanted=all


You have a distressing penchant for distorting data so that it supports your preconceived ideas. You always seem to think that the younger generation is going to hell in a hand-basket, and you'll jump on anything you think supports that, no matter how insubstantial or flimsy, and no matter how much you have to over-generalize, and no matter how much contradictory data you have to ignore. You sound like every other old geezer, from time immemorial. whose decried what's happening to "today's youth".







hawkeye10
 
  -2  
Reply Sat 4 May, 2013 11:47 am
@firefly,
Quote:
When were teens not enmeshed in "a culture that breeds narcissism and entitlement"--that's almost the very definition of teen culture, the psychological world teens live in. Adolescents do tend to be narcissistic and to have a sense of entitlement, it's almost part and parcel of that stage of development, and it's not exclusively due to the culture of the times, it's part of that phase of life


hopefully entitled narcissistic lazy twits at some point grow up and learn that the universe does not give a **** about them and that civilization is the result of hard work.

reality is going to go down hard with todays youth, who suffer from bad education as well as lies and theft from their elders.
 

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