19
   

Texas Fertilizer explosion: at least 70 dead

 
 
JTT
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 21 Apr, 2013 01:41 pm
@chai2,
I'm floored by the honesty, but appreciative none the less.

You've just pretty much described the whole of the US propaganda system, Chai. Y'all have been so well indoctrinated that you can take the ball and run with it without the oversight of a government propaganda agent.

And the really great thing for the puppet masters is that it never gets old. The folks in each new area hit by some tiny calamity, when measured against what is being done to MILLIONS around the globe, get their moment in the spotlight.

It's like "Hey Mom, look I'm semi-famous!" Their "So you think you can dance" moment.

0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Apr, 2013 03:25 pm
@gungasnake,

Quote:
As I've heard it, one of the biggest if not the biggest non nuclear explosions in recorded history took place when a shipload of fertilizer leveled most of Galveston somewhere in the early 1900s.


Interesting. A shipload of munitions blew up in the harbour of Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1917, and devastated the town. I've heard that described as the biggest ever non-nuclear explosion.

Boom. http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/1491631/Halifax-explosion-of-1917
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Apr, 2013 03:36 pm
@McTag,
Quote:
Texas City disaster
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



The SS Wilson B. Keene, destroyed in the disaster's second explosion
The Texas City disaster of April 16, 1947 is the deadliest industrial accident in U.S. history, and one of the largest non-nuclear explosions. Originating with a mid-morning fire on board the French-registered vessel SS Grandcamp (docked in the Port of Texas City), its cargo of approximately 2,300 tons (approximately 2,100 metric tons) of ammonium nitrate detonated,[1] with the initial blast and subsequent chain-reaction of further fires and explosions in other ships and nearby oil-storage facilities killing at least 581 people, including all but one member of the Texas City fire department.[2] The disaster triggered the first ever class action lawsuit against the United States government, under the then-recently enacted Federal Tort Claims Act (FTCA), on behalf of 8,485 victims.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Texas_City_Disaster
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Apr, 2013 03:47 pm
@JTT,
So the French were involved in both of these explosions.

I think that tell us all we need to know.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Apr, 2013 03:49 pm
@McTag,
Had it been another time, it might easily have been ramped up into a cause for war.
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Apr, 2013 04:13 pm
@Ceili,
Ceili wrote:

I think ehBeth means an awareness of how much everyone in the surrounding area is affected by this, unlike Boston where most people can get on with their day to day lives. Empathy that there is so much destruction and so many people will not be able to bounce back as quickly, as a lot of homes and businesses have been destroyed. That's what struck me too.


Well, yes, that is pretty much what I was getting at.....Not to make light of the lives lost there (in Boston), but why does something that happens in a "sexy" place i.e. a city, or to a well known person let's say, get so much more media coverage, when overall the event effected such a smaller proportion of lives?

Yes, there is the suspected act of terrorism, I'm talking other than that.

4 people die in a well known place, and it's just ever so much more interesting than half a town in China or in the Congo getting wiped away by mudslides or Aides.

I say consider how an event is going to change the life of the greater proportion of people remaining before sending in the good looking reporters.

Just like people care about Lindsay Lohen getting drunk, but let the fact a drunk driver killed 2 carloads is small potatoes.
JTT
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 21 Apr, 2013 05:38 pm
@chai2,
That's essentially what I've been saying for some time now, Chai.

Though you have correctly pointed out the hypocrisy, I believe that you have left out some of the more important places that are deemed secondary, or even much much further down the ordinal rank.

Take for example;

Quote:

The Under-Examined Story of Fallujah
By Hannah Gurman, November 23, 2011


Seven years after the U.S. invasion of Fallujah, there are reports of an alarming rise in the rates of birth defects and cancer. But the crisis, and its possible connection to weapons deployed by the United States during the war, remains woefully under-examined.

On November 8, 2004, U.S. military forces launched Operation Phantom Fury 50 miles west of Baghdad in Fallujah, a city of 350,000 people known for its opposition to the Saddam regime.

The United States did not expect to encounter resistance in Fallujah, nor did it initially face any in the early days of the war. The first sign of serious hostility appeared in April 2003, after U.S. soldiers from the 82nd Airborne division fired into a crowd of protesters demonstrating against the occupation and the closure of their local school building, killing 17 civilians and injuring 70. The following February, amid mounting tensions, a local militia beheaded four Blackwater employees and strung their bodies from a bridge across the Euphrates River. U.S. forces temporarily withdrew from Fallujah and planned for a full onslaught.

Following the evacuation of civilians, Marines cordoned off the city, even as some residents scrambled to escape. Thirty to fifty thousand people were still inside the city when the U.S. military launched a series of airstrikes, dropping incendiary bombs on suspected insurgent hideouts. Ground forces then combed through targeted neighborhoods house by house. Ross Caputi, who served as a first private Marine during the siege, has said that his squad and others employed “reconnaissance by fire,” firing into dwellings before entering to make sure nobody inside was still alive. Caputi later co-founded the group Justice for Fallujah, which dedicated the week of November 14 to a public awareness campaign about the impact of the war on the city’s people

By the end of the campaign, Fallujah was a ghost town. Though the military did not tally civilian casualties, independent reports put the number somewhere between 800 and 6,000. As The Washington Post reported in April 2005, more than half of Fallujah’s 39,000 homes were damaged, of which 10,000 were no longer habitable. Five months after the campaign, only 90,000 of the city’s evacuated residents had returned. The majority still lacked electricity, and the city’s sewage and water systems, badly damaged in the campaign, were not functional. A mounting unemployment crisis — exacerbated by security checkpoints, which blocked the flow of people and goods into and out of the city — left young residents of Fallujah especially vulnerable to recruitment by the resistance.

The Official Success Story

Although the initial picture of the devastated city looked grim, by 2007 Fallujah had become a key part of the emerging narrative of successful counterinsurgency in Iraq. At a press conference in April of that year, Marine Colonel Richard Simcock declared that progress was “phenomenal” and that Fallujah was an “economically strong and flourishing city.” According to the official narrative that has since crystallized, the second siege of Fallujah turned out to be a major turning point in the war. “By taking down Fallujah, the Marines denied a sanctuary for the insurgents,” said Richard Natonski, commander of the 1st Marine Division during Phantom Fury, in an oral history published by the Marines in 2009. In contrast to the insurgents who relied on “brutal tactics,” he explained, the Marines were able to win over the good will of the people. This contributed to the larger “Awakening” in Anbar province, the linchpin of counterinsurgency’s “success” in Iraq.


http://www.fpif.org/articles/the_under-examined_story_of_fallujah
Ceili
 
  2  
Reply Sun 21 Apr, 2013 05:47 pm
@chai2,
I don't think it's necessarily that it's not a big town or sexy. I just depends on the newsday. Had the explosion happened today, it would have been front page coverage from coast to coast. If I remember correctly, Lady Di and Mother Theresa died on the same day, guess who got all the press. In the week or so that was 9-11, did anything happen anywhere that mattered?
The media peddle what will sell. I saw some great coverage on the blast in Texas, on Canadian, British and US sites. But... I had to go looking for it. Same with the earthquake in China and a way more devastating bomb in Iraq, not to mention more atrocities in Syria. The US media, as a whole, has always been very insular. There is a reason people don't know the difference between Czech and Chechens. Ironically, the bombing and the explosion seemed to have intertwined both groups in an odd coincidence.
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Sun 21 Apr, 2013 05:54 pm
@Ceili,
Quote:
The US media, as a whole, has always been very insular.


Cute euphemism, Ceili.
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Apr, 2013 05:59 pm
@Ceili,
Ceili wrote:


The media peddle what will sell.



Yep, and therein lies the problem.

And who tells us what will sell?

The same media.

BTW, I'll tell you exactly what was going on right at 911....Does Chandra Levy ring a bell?

If it doesn't, or seems distant, thank those who tell you what's important.

Ceili
 
  2  
Reply Sun 21 Apr, 2013 06:07 pm
@chai2,
I'm a canuck, and yeah, I remember that story, then again that story was an overblown media darling too.
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Apr, 2013 06:33 pm
@Ceili,
Ceili wrote:

I'm a canuck, and yeah, I remember that story, then again that story was an overblown media darling too.


Exactly.

Now you're getting it.
0 Replies
 
mysteryman
 
  2  
Reply Sun 21 Apr, 2013 06:59 pm
@JTT,
"First private marine"?
There is no such rank in the USMC, so where did the writer make that up?
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Apr, 2013 07:03 pm
@mysteryman,
You don't want to push too much on the Ross Caputi story mm. You won't like the results.
Butrflynet
 
  3  
Reply Sun 21 Apr, 2013 07:06 pm
@chai2,
There hasn't been much reporting of the Exxon pipeline spill in Arkansas either. That happened way before the Marathon bombings. Big oil has been doing their best to use their influence and ad buying power to pressure media into squelching any reports or images of the disaster there because they don't want it to taint the Keystone votes they've bought.

I strongly suspect, there is something similar happening regarding the fertilizer explosion and the chemical industry.
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Apr, 2013 07:11 pm
@Butrflynet,
Interesting b-net, why do you say that?

From my understanding, the chemicals involved, when left alone, were basically inert.

I listened to a UT professor state that (forget which chemical) you could take a blow torch to it, and it wouldn't even ignite, let alone explode.

What has been said so far about why there was a fire in the first place?
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Apr, 2013 07:26 pm
@mysteryman,
Quote:
"First private marine"?
There is no such rank in the USMC, so where did the writer make that up?


Is this really the best you can do, MM? Look, there's a squirrel!
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Sun 21 Apr, 2013 07:34 pm
@ehBeth,
Is there something in particular that keeps you from sharing this type of knowledge that you have with the rest of us, Beth?
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Apr, 2013 07:56 pm
@JTT,
ehbeth sometimes uses a secret language that you're just supposed to know.

Like when I asked for clarification, she says she can't be bothered to agree me, which means I'm locked out of trying to find out what she's saying.

In other words, it's the other persons fault if they can't understand her.

So I won't be misconstrued as talking "about" her, I'll say it right to her.

Ehbeth, when someone asks you a point blank question, what do you have against just giving a simple reply? I know this is off topic, but you many times come across as very passive aggressive.

JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Apr, 2013 08:05 pm
@chai2,
I understand, Chai. I think you know that I get this all the time and not just from Beth.

Ross Caputi says:

The Pentagon rhetoric is meant to deflect attention from all the moral questions that American citizens should be engaging in and focus their attention on the plight of our troops. Honest public discourse would address a persistent pattern of brutal and inhuman behavior by our troops and why that sort of behavior is to be expected in this war with all of its ideological distortions and immoral foundations. And it would address the right of Afghans to resist the imposition of our policies in their country, and the callousness of our leaders for putting our troops in harm's way by asking them to violate the rights of Afghans.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

T'Pring is Dead - Discussion by Brandon9000
Another Calif. shooting spree: 4 dead - Discussion by Lustig Andrei
Friends don't let friends fat-talk - Discussion by hawkeye10
Before you criticize the media - Discussion by Robert Gentel
Fatal Baloon Accident - Discussion by 33export
The Day Ferguson Cops Were Caught in a Bloody Lie - Discussion by bobsal u1553115
Robin Williams is dead - Discussion by Butrflynet
 
Copyright © 2022 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.04 seconds on 12/01/2022 at 06:07:10