Reply Tue 16 Apr, 2013 07:08 am
Hi English teachers,
are my below sentences acceptable? Many thanks in advance.
A person can have many houses. However, only one home can a person have.
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Type: Question • Score: 7 • Views: 3,091 • Replies: 18
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View best answer, chosen by Loh Jane
InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Apr, 2013 09:46 am
@Loh Jane,
The first one is ok.

The second one has its word order mixed up.

"However, a person can have only one home."
0 Replies
 
mark noble
 
  0  
Reply Tue 16 Apr, 2013 09:54 am
NO!
YOU can have lots of homes.
So STOP BEING STUPID!
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
  Selected Answer
 
  2  
Reply Tue 16 Apr, 2013 10:20 am
@Loh Jane,
Many houses can a person have, but only one home
Many houses but only one home can a person have

A person can have many houses but only one home (one home only)
One can possess many houses (many a house) but (tho) just one home

Though anybody might possess any number of houses, he can have just one home

Many a house though he might own, only one home can he possess


Good gosh Mark what is it with you this morning anyhow
Loh Jane
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Apr, 2013 08:21 am
@dalehileman,
Hi dal,
your sentences look better but are my sentences acceptable?
A person can have many houses. However, only one home can a person have.
Loh Jane
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Apr, 2013 08:32 am
@dalehileman,
Thank you.
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Apr, 2013 12:35 pm
@Loh Jane,
Quote:
but are my sentences acceptable?
I think grammatically okay
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Apr, 2013 12:43 pm
@Loh Jane,
Loh Jane wrote:

However, only one home can a person have.


A lot of people in Britain have "second homes" either in other parts of the UK or in other countries - Spain, France, Ireland, for example.


JTT
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Apr, 2013 03:39 pm
@Loh Jane,
Quote:
A person can have many houses. However, only one home can a person have.


Yes, they're fine, Jane. The second is rather lyrical/poetic.

Quote:
are my below sentences acceptable?


This sentence, Jane, is most assuredly not acceptable. I've mentioned this to you before that we do not use 'below' in this frontal position.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Apr, 2013 05:55 pm
@contrex,
Perhaps Jane is referring to 'home' in its most endearing sense as in 'home and hearth'.
0 Replies
 
Loh Jane
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Apr, 2013 06:12 am
@JTT,
Hi JTT,
what word should I use for the above-mentioned sentence?
0 Replies
 
Loh Jane
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Apr, 2013 06:19 am
@contrex,
Hi contrex,
I think I may have understood wrong, I thought 'home' meant the owner who normally stayed. Can I use a 'main residence' to replace the 'home'?
0 Replies
 
Loh Jane
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Apr, 2013 06:19 am
@contrex,
Hi contrex,
I think I may have understood wrong, I thought a 'home' meant the owner who normally stayed. Can I use a 'main residence' to replace the 'home'?
0 Replies
 
Loh Jane
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Apr, 2013 06:27 am
@JTT,
Hi JTT,
can I say 'Please correct my English sentence below'?
gungasnake
 
  0  
Reply Thu 18 Apr, 2013 06:41 am
@Loh Jane,
"English Grammar" is an oxymoron. If you wish to study grammar, you need to study some language (German, Russian...) which actually has grammar.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Apr, 2013 10:38 am
@gungasnake,
Quote:
"English Grammar" is an oxymoron. If you wish to study grammar, you need to study some language (German, Russian...) which actually has grammar.


If you thought, Gunga, even for a millisecond, you would realize just how ignorant this notion of yours is.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Apr, 2013 12:18 pm
@Loh Jane,
Quote:
Hi JTT,
can I say 'Please correct my English sentence below'?


Yes, you can, Jane. That is the much much much preferred position among native speakers.

After some considerable research, I find that this turns out to be rather difficult to explain. I'm still working on it.
0 Replies
 
gungasnake
 
  2  
Reply Sat 20 Apr, 2013 12:04 am
@JTT,
English doesn't have grammar. I mean there's a trace of a genitive case indicating possession and pronouns decline, but that's about all there is left of Ind-European grammar in English. English basically uses word order and prepositions in lieu of grammar.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sat 20 Apr, 2013 02:21 pm
@gungasnake,
Keep going, Gunga. This will stand as a dictionary definition of 'ignorant'.

If English grammar was as simple as you suggest, you'd be there, front and center, explaining it. Where ya been, laddie?
0 Replies
 
 

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