5
   

Does "Christians all too often come across as arrogant, judgmental, and ..." mean...?

 
 
InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Apr, 2013 12:24 pm
@JTT,
You're right, I misread Oristar's paraphrase.
0 Replies
 
InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Apr, 2013 12:28 pm
@oristarA,
oristarA wrote:
If "they" refer to "others" in the writer's mind, how will you correct the sentence below:
Christians all too often create the impression in others that they are arrogant, judgmental, and self-righteous.

Supposed I've written the sentence, in which I've thought mistakenly that "they" referred to "others." And you as a reader, naturally think "they" refer to "Christians." But my original intention was indeed to express this:

Christians all too often create the impression in others' hearts that they (others) are arrogant, judgmental, and self-righteous (and in Christians' hearts, only Christians are humble, kindhearted and good-intentioned and correct)


One of the dangers of pronouns is that they can lead to confusion of what they are referring to.

In the case of your sentence, however, it's fairly clear that "they" refers to "others" in which the impression is made.

Oftentimes writers will substitute the words "the former" and "the latter" instead of pronouns to clarify to whom they are referring, although it may lead to a clumsy sounding sentence.

"Christians all too often create the impression in others that the former are arrogant, judgmental, and self-righteous."
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Apr, 2013 12:57 pm
@oristarA,
Quote:
Thank you JTT.
If "they" refer to "others" in the writer's mind, how will you correct the sentence below:
Christians all too often create the impression in others that they are arrogant, judgmental, and self-righteous.

Supposed I've written the sentence, in which I've thought mistakenly that "they" referred to "others." And you as a reader, naturally think "they" refer to "Christians." But my original intention was indeed to express this:

Christians all too often create the impression in others' hearts that they (others) are arrogant, judgmental, and self-righteous (and in Christians' hearts, only Christians are humble, kindhearted and good-intentioned and correct)


There is no antecedent for 'they', Ori, other than Christians. It's completely reasonable, following English grammar/semantics to know that 'they' is connected to Christians.

I'm sure that there are situations where the semantics allows antecedent/pronoun confusion to occur, but it unlikely here.

How can Christians create impressions in some amorphous group of "others" minds that the others are whatever Christians say they are.

If you to describe your situation,

Christians all too often create the impression in others' hearts that these others are arrogant, judgmental, and self-righteous.

oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Apr, 2013 10:35 pm
@engineer,
engineer wrote:

How about adding a word...

"Christians often create the impression that they judge others as arrogant, judgmental, and self-righteous while they themselves are humble, kindhearted and good-intentioned."


http://ts4.cn.mm.bing.net/th?id=H.4906721921796787&pid=1.7
0 Replies
 
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Apr, 2013 10:52 pm
@InfraBlue,
InfraBlue wrote:

oristarA wrote:
If "they" refer to "others" in the writer's mind, how will you correct the sentence below:
Christians all too often create the impression in others that they are arrogant, judgmental, and self-righteous.

Supposed I've written the sentence, in which I've thought mistakenly that "they" referred to "others." And you as a reader, naturally think "they" refer to "Christians." But my original intention was indeed to express this:

Christians all too often create the impression in others' hearts that they (others) are arrogant, judgmental, and self-righteous (and in Christians' hearts, only Christians are humble, kindhearted and good-intentioned and correct)


One of the dangers of pronouns is that they can lead to confusion of what they are referring to.

In the case of your sentence, however, it's fairly clear that "they" refers to "others" in which the impression is made.

Oftentimes writers will substitute the words "the former" and "the latter" instead of pronouns to clarify to whom they are referring, although it may lead to a clumsy sounding sentence.

"Christians all too often create the impression in others that the former are arrogant, judgmental, and self-righteous."



Indeed it is inerrable and sounds a bit clumsy.


0 Replies
 
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Apr, 2013 11:05 pm
@JTT,
JTT wrote:

Quote:
Thank you JTT.
If "they" refer to "others" in the writer's mind, how will you correct the sentence below:
Christians all too often create the impression in others that they are arrogant, judgmental, and self-righteous.

Supposed I've written the sentence, in which I've thought mistakenly that "they" referred to "others." And you as a reader, naturally think "they" refer to "Christians." But my original intention was indeed to express this:

Christians all too often create the impression in others' hearts that they (others) are arrogant, judgmental, and self-righteous (and in Christians' hearts, only Christians are humble, kindhearted and good-intentioned and correct)


There is no antecedent for 'they', Ori, other than Christians. It's completely reasonable, following English grammar/semantics to know that 'they' is connected to Christians.

I'm sure that there are situations where the semantics allows antecedent/pronoun confusion to occur, but it unlikely here.

How can Christians create impressions in some amorphous group of "others" minds that the others are whatever Christians say they are.

If you to describe your situation,

Christians all too often create the impression in others' hearts that these others are arrogant, judgmental, and self-righteous.



It's sad that "others" looks an antecedent to me.

The meaning of the sentence in blue is crystal clear to me. I wonder whether we can substitute "these others" for "they" and the meaning will be unchanged:

Christians all too often create the impression in others' hearts that they are arrogant, judgmental, and self-righteous.
0 Replies
 
 

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