4
   

Does "tourists get bang for buck firing guns" mean "tourists get joy for money-paying guns"?

 
 
Reply Sat 2 Mar, 2013 08:55 am


Context:
Foreign tourists get bang for buck firing guns

Tourists from countries with strict gun control see the U.S. firing ranges as enticing places to visit, but many say they feel safer once they get back home.

More:
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/03/02/gun-control-tourism-hawaii-assault-weapons/1957653/
 
View best answer, chosen by oristarA
Region Philbis
  Selected Answer
 
  3  
Reply Sat 2 Mar, 2013 08:59 am
@oristarA,

it means they get their money's worth at the firing ranges...
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Mar, 2013 09:34 am
@Region Philbis,
Region Philbis wrote:


it means they get their money's worth at the firing ranges...


A cool usage.
Thank you.

PS. What does "what's ground zero" mean "what's the point/meaningness"?

Context:

Quote:
Tourists come to the U.S. to explore the beauty of the Grand Canyon, the grandeur of the U.S. Capitol, and the skyscrapers of New York City. Increasingly, they're also coming to shoot assault weapons.

Gun culture in America is a hot tourist attraction. What's ground zero for gun tourism? Beautiful Waikiki, Hawaii.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Mar, 2013 09:35 am
@oristarA,
getting bang for bucks is an idiom

you really need to work on your idioms
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  3  
Reply Sat 2 Mar, 2013 10:50 am
@oristarA,

"ground zero" is the point on the earth's surface directly above or below an exploding nuclear bomb.

in this context, it refer to the best place, or epicenter, for gun tourism...
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Sun 3 Mar, 2013 09:31 pm
@oristarA,
Quote:
Foreign tourists get bang for buck firing guns


Beyond the idiom, 'get bang for one's bucks', there is a play on words, Ori. As Region has described [and Beth failed to], it means to get your money's worth, or even more than your money's worth. Not only a good deal but a great deal.

Beyond that, the writer has used this to note that literally, not just figuratively, as in the idiom, these folks get many bangs which is the sound that we use to describe a gun going off.

oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Mar, 2013 08:14 am
@JTT,
JTT wrote:

Quote:
Foreign tourists get bang for buck firing guns


Beyond the idiom, 'get bang for one's bucks', there is a play on words, Ori. As Region has described [and Beth failed to], it means to get your money's worth, or even more than your money's worth. Not only a good deal but a great deal.

Beyond that, the writer has used this to note that literally, not just figuratively, as in the idiom, these folks get many bangs which is the sound that we use to describe a gun going off.


Excellent!
Can we use the idiom in first person, JTT? For example:
Do not worry. I will get bang for my bucks.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Mar, 2013 12:19 pm
@oristarA,
Quote:
Can we use the idiom in first person, JTT? For example:
Do not worry. I will get bang for my bucks.


I suppose it could be used in the first person, Ori, but there's something about that example that just doesn't sound very natural.

0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Mar, 2013 01:14 pm
@oristarA,
"I will get a lot of bang per buck." is the way you would hear it. Bang is deliberately singular. Kind of like 'miles per gallon'.

The original "Foreign tourists get bang for buck firing guns" is a headline, and is somewhat abbreviated.
0 Replies
 
 

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