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When one has panic attacks...

 
 
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 02:43 pm
should one go home after work then rest and/or sleep or go to the gym and workout then go home?
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Type: Question • Score: 15 • Views: 2,838 • Replies: 28

 
View best answer, chosen by tsarstepan
djjd62
 
  4  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 02:46 pm
@tsarstepan,
tsarstepan wrote:
go to the gym and workout


okay, i just had a panic attack Razz
0 Replies
 
PUNKEY
 
  4  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 02:48 pm
Believe it or not, hard exercise does help with stress.

But panic attacks need investigation as to what the "trigger" is . . . Neither rest or exercise will alleviate them.
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 02:53 pm
@PUNKEY,
I know what my trigger was (this time around) but I rather not discuss it here. Thankfully they've been minor. Haven't had them in a long time.

Re the trigger: I could have posted this thread in Boomerang's worry thread and be too far off.
dlowan
 
  4  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 04:28 pm
@tsarstepan,
Are you really up to date on the biology and treatment of panic attacks?

Exercise can be a great way of dealing with the adrenaline....after all our bodies are designed to be ready for explosive physical activity when we become anxious, not to deal with threats or perceived threats for which fight or flight is not a reasonable response.

However, one of the big morbidity worries from them is avoidance of the situations in which they occurred, so I think going back to, or remaining in the office if that is where the thing occurred, is a wise idea.


Sorry you had one.....they're not nice.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 04:31 pm
@dlowan,
It was Jimmie Breslin , I believe who wrote about a button man who worked for the Five Families . Hed get panic attacks every time he was required to dispose of a body in the MEadowlands
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  3  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 04:55 pm
@tsarstepan,
I'd go to the gym but do a light workout. One advantage of the gym is, there are people around. Not to be morbid - it's more in the sense that company can help.

But I would definitely be working on dumping the adrenaline positively.
chai2
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 07:51 pm
I'm going to differ with the others here, and say go home and rest.

My understanding of panic attacks is that during it you've sucked every iota of adrenaline out of your system, wasted it quickly, now your body is looking for more....causing the panic. There's nothing to fuel it.

If this isn't a regular occurence, I say go home and rest quietly.

Light exercise could help it from reoccuring, but now is the time to be gentle and kind to yourself.
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  3  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 07:52 pm
@jespah,
Thanks guys. I did go to the gym and rode the bike on an easy level for 25 minutes. After a third of that, it was much easier to breath and the panic attack ended.

Now I should try and learn and develop some kind of breathing exercise that would help when I'm trapped at work.
Lola
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 08:06 pm
@tsarstepan,
At work, try breathing into a paper bag. It's supposed to work. Although I've never seen it myself. But that's the recommended thing.
Lola
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 08:12 pm
@tsarstepan,
http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/ate/mentalhealth/205625.html

"When people get anxiety attacks they 'over-breathe'. This lowers the level of carbon dioxide in the blood and that makes them feel worse! Breathing into a paper bag for half a dozen or so breaths, builds up the carbon dioxide in your body again, so you should immediately start feeling better.
The size of the bag doesn't matter – but unless you use a decent-sized one, you won't be able to breathe very much air into it. I suggest at least six inches by four.
I've never heard of anyone doing this exercise every day, but it's worth a try. Many therapists would suggest structured breathing exercises (combined with relaxation) every day.
Ask your doctor about this."


djjd62
  Selected Answer
 
  6  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 08:17 pm
@Lola,
you can do the breathing thing without the bag, try square breathing, inhale slowly to a count of 4, hold for a count of 4, exhale to a count of 4, hold for a count of 4, repeat
JPB
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 08:42 pm
@djjd62,
djjd62 wrote:

you can do the breathing thing without the bag, try square breathing, inhale slowly to a count of 4, hold for a count of 4, exhale to a count of 4, hold for a count of 4, repeat


Yes, just as soon as you have the wherewith-all to realize that you're having a panic attack and not a heart attack or stroke or other potentially fatal attack. You aren't going to die from a panic attack so the first thing to do is to tell yourself just that. THEN, once you've acknowledged that your current distress is panic-related four square breathing is quite helpful. With time and support you can feel the onset of an attack and go into four-square breathing before it hits.
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  4  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 09:17 pm
@tsarstepan,
The slow breathing......which has already been described will help.

The paper bag thing went out of favour for ages, however it is back again because the physiology works. When you hyperventilate you actually end up with too much oxygen in your blood....the transfer of oxygen to cells requires a certain level of carbon dioxide in order to happen. The weird feelings you get when you have too much oxygen....eg feeling breathless, trigger you to feel more anxious. As do the weird feelings from adrenaline etc that is not expended in intense physical activity. We naturally over breathe when we feel anxious because we evolved the anxiety response in order to meet real physical danger.

When we have a panic attack we get into a cycle of responding to the symptoms as though they are dangers...vicious cycle.

Breathing into and out of a paper bag will naturally increase your carbon dioxide levels and you start to feel physically more normal..

The key is the cognitive part, though....to be aware that your body is reacting too hard to some sort of anxiety......often such attacks occur separate from the triggers, which can be confusing...like when we are relaxing!

Your mind interprets the physical symptom as a threat.....usually that we are dying, or nuts, or that something awful is about to happen. You need to ride the thing like a wave...maintaining awareness that, like a wave in the ocean, if you remain aware of what is happening, you won't be adding to the symptoms and it will pass.

If they become a problem, they're usually easy to treat...lots of people are helped just by reading about them in a good self help book so they really understand what is happening.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 09:18 pm
@dlowan,
Lol.....and Lola already said it while I was typing!
0 Replies
 
Timothyford
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Feb, 2013 12:48 am
@tsarstepan,
Its better to go gym for workout and then go home.
0 Replies
 
amygarside
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Feb, 2013 06:29 am
@tsarstepan,
It will depend on the person, personally if the gym is near your office then it does not make sense to go home.
0 Replies
 
PUNKEY
 
  3  
Reply Tue 5 Feb, 2013 10:28 am
Well, some people cant pull out a paper bag at work or get down and do 20 pushups.

So when a person feels "trapped" in a place, like work or in a store or restaurant, what can they do?

I understand that sitting in a chair and lowering your head between your legs may help - but that could be a problem, too. Breaking out in song helps, too, I hear.

tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Feb, 2013 10:37 am
@Lola,
Lolaessense wrote:

http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/ate/mentalhealth/205625.html

"When people get anxiety attacks they 'over-breathe'. This lowers the level of carbon dioxide in the blood and that makes them feel worse! Breathing into a paper bag for half a dozen or so breaths, builds up the carbon dioxide in your body again, so you should immediately start feeling better.
The size of the bag doesn't matter – but unless you use a decent-sized one, you won't be able to breathe very much air into it. I suggest at least six inches by four.
I've never heard of anyone doing this exercise every day, but it's worth a try. Many therapists would suggest structured breathing exercises (combined with relaxation) every day.
Ask your doctor about this."




That's hyperventilating which doesn't happen to me. I go to the opposite extreme where I find out I'm not breathing enough and I have to force my self to take deeper breaths. My breathing problems tend to make me very tired indeed.
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Feb, 2013 10:42 am
@PUNKEY,
PUNKEY wrote:

Well, some people cant pull out a paper bag at work or get down and do 20 pushups.

So when a person feels "trapped" in a place, like work or in a store or restaurant, what can they do?

I understand that sitting in a chair and lowering your head between your legs may help - but that could be a problem, too. Breaking out in song helps, too, I hear.



Nobody wants to hear my brain aneurism inducing singing. Even the army weapons of mass destruction scientists told me to stop singing for the death count of my hypothetical singing weapon would be too brutal, too devastating, too monstrous to unleash on the world. Mad

If I have to deal with another panic attack with some breathing exercises, I'll not remain at my desk and head to the restroom for some privacy.
0 Replies
 
 

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