6
   

Alzheimer drug helps mice recover some hearing

 
 
DrewDad
 
Reply Wed 9 Jan, 2013 01:52 pm
Alzheimer's Drug Dials Back Deafness In Mice

Quote:
A drug developed for Alzheimer's disease can partially reverse hearing loss caused by exposure to extremely loud sounds, an international team reports in the journal Neuron.

...

Loud noises cause hearing loss by injuring or killing hair cells, cells in the inner ear that transform sounds into electrical signals that are sent to the brain.

...

Hair cells can be lost to diseases, after taking certain medications, or as a part of normal aging. And hearing specialists are seeing a new group of relatively young people who have lost hair cells, Edge says.

"What's important in our society right now are a lot of the soldiers coming back from overseas who have been exposed to even a single loud noise which can seriously damage hearing," he says.

...

Next, the team administered an experimental drug known as a gamma secretase inhibitor to the inner ear. Gamma secretase inhibitors were developed to treat Alzheimer's disease, but haven't worked out for that purpose. The drugs never made it to the market for humans — or mice — so you can't go ask your doctor for a presciption.

These drugs have an interesting side effect, though, Edge says. In mice, they can cause so-called support cells from the inner ear to transform into hair cells.

"And to our delight these hair cells were functioning hair cells that improved the hearing of the animal," he says.

Edge says this shows it IS possible to grow new hair cells in a mammal. And because mice and humans have very similar hearing systems, he says, the approach is likely to work in people too.

It's not a complete cure, though. The mice got only about 20 percent of their hearing back, and still couldn't hear certain sound frequencies, Edge says.
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 6 • Views: 2,564 • Replies: 17

 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Jan, 2013 01:58 pm
@DrewDad,
That's great news. I wonder if I can get in on this via the VA hospital.
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Jan, 2013 01:59 pm
@tsarstepan,
It's not even in human trials, yet, I'm afraid.
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Jan, 2013 02:02 pm
@DrewDad,
((sigh))
0 Replies
 
Serioussupplements
 
  -3  
Reply Thu 10 Jan, 2013 02:49 am
@DrewDad,
Hello Friends,

Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia among older people. It involves parts of the brain that control thought, memory, and language. Alzheimer's damages a person's ability to reason, remember, speak, perform simple calculations, and carry out routine tasks. Over time, patients also may become anxious or aggressive or wander away from home. In the later stages, they may forget how to do basic tasks, like brushing their teeth or dressing themselves. Eventually, patients need total care.

Thanks and Regards,
Michal Zalewski
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Jan, 2013 03:17 am
@tsarstepan,
I do understand VA has some really good hearing aids, and I assume your loss is service connected.

Someday, you're going to have to tell us what it's like inside a tank when you set off the gun. I seem to recall that was a part of what you did.
DrewDad
 
  2  
Reply Thu 10 Jan, 2013 07:56 am
@roger,
Ah. I once knew a former artillery officer. He told me about how he and the other artillery guys would make fun of the tank guys' hearing loss....
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Jan, 2013 08:07 am
@DrewDad,
I was in artillery and not tanks. I can attest to the loud booms from our 155 mm cannon.

Tried to get the hearing loss as service connected and failed to do so. Perhaps I should have done so as soon after I left the service instead of waiting many years afterwards. I don't think I can qualify for the hearing aids based on a service connected disability.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Jan, 2013 09:52 am
I read this yesterday, good news.

<wishing for speed re working this out with humans>
roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Jan, 2013 01:02 pm
@ossobuco,
I would bet that the reasearch and trials will cost more that they are willling to pay for something that treats such a small market.
DrewDad
 
  2  
Reply Thu 10 Jan, 2013 01:56 pm
@roger,
With the Baby Boomers about to retire, it seems to me that this has a huge market.
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Jan, 2013 02:40 pm
@DrewDad,
Fer sure.

Plus as Gen X'ers (who listened to a lot of loud music) get older.

Interesting info!
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Jan, 2013 03:06 pm
@DrewDad,
Maybe, but note that not all hearing loss is caused by damaged hair cells, and even in those cases, only about 20% of the hearing has been restored. I couldn't tell from the article if that is 20% of the loss, or if the mouse ended up with 20% of normal hearing.

My thinking is still that the market isn't, or might not be large enough to financially justify the research and clinical trials. I would love to be wrong, especially if that is the specific cause my my own loss.
DrewDad
 
  3  
Reply Thu 10 Jan, 2013 03:32 pm
@roger,
Damaged hair cells are by far the largest cause of hearing loss.
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Jan, 2013 07:38 pm
@DrewDad,
DrewDad wrote:

Damaged hair cells are by far the largest cause of hearing loss.

Does that mean I can use Rogaine and salon quality conditioner in my ear to fix/strengthen/regrow my ear hair?
roger
 
  4  
Reply Thu 10 Jan, 2013 08:05 pm
@tsarstepan,
Iffen hair cells are the same as ear hair, my hearing is perfect. Sadly. . . .
0 Replies
 
amygarside
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 Jan, 2013 02:50 am
@DrewDad,
This is quite interesting.
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Wed 23 Apr, 2014 01:57 pm
http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg22229662.400-deaf-people-get-gene-tweak-to-restore-natural-hearing.html
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

Immortality and Doctor Volkov - Discussion by edgarblythe
Sleep Paralysis - Discussion by Nick Ashley
On the edge and toppling off.... - Discussion by Izzie
Surgery--Again - Discussion by Roberta
PTSD, is it caused by a blow to the head? - Question by Rickoshay75
THE GIRL IS ILL - Discussion by Setanta
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Alzheimer drug helps mice recover some hearing
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.04 seconds on 11/19/2019 at 11:44:09