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Ways to learn and to practice English idioms

 
 
Reply Mon 8 Oct, 2012 11:52 am
In my view the best way to learn English idioms is by topics with explanations of meaning, examples of usage and subsequent exercises. Practising idioms can be done through exercises in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing. I suggest the following sequence of learning English idioms (5-10 idioms per lesson):

1. Read clear precise meanings of idioms with usage examples in several realistic sentences in a good thematic dictionary of English idioms.

2. Do ready-made exercises from textbooks in idioms practice. Exercises in idioms practice can include dialogues, narrations (telling stories), thematic texts, questions and answers with idioms in various situations, discussions, talking points and expressing opinions and views on real life topics and issues.
A good textbook for English idiom practice is: English Idioms in Use (by McCarthy, Michael and O’Dell, Felicity). Cambridge University Press, 2002. ISBN: 0-521-78957-5.

3. Make up your own sentences for using idioms in real life situations.

4. Learners can further practice English idioms in the following ways:

a) when listening to audio and video recordings containing thematic texts with idioms and with subsequent speaking on the texts they heard;
b) when speaking English using idiomatic expressions on various topics;
c) when reading and retelling texts in English with idioms on a multitude of topics.
The English language is rich in idioms, and although it is possible to converse correctly in non-idiomatic English, a student with only a superficial knowledge of English idioms will find himself (or herself) at a serious disadvantage in his (her) reading, and even more so when he (she) takes part in discussions and debates. Ready-made copious usage sentences of English idioms taken from real life offer guidance on the most effective way to use them. The English Idiom Dictionaries listed by me below provide clear idiom usage explanations and several realistic idiom usage sentences. Many native English speakers, especially when they converse among themselves use idioms, informal colloquial expressions and slang.
There are a lot of textbooks, websites, audio and video aids for learning and practicing English idioms.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 4 • Views: 3,973 • Replies: 13
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JTT
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Oct, 2012 12:00 pm
@Complete,
Excellent advice, C.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Oct, 2012 12:05 pm
@JTT,
Do you have any comments on a phrase book approach to language study? And lexical chunks, for that matter
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Oct, 2012 12:12 pm
@roger,
Is your question addressed to me, Roger?
roger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Oct, 2012 12:25 pm
@JTT,
Well, yes it was.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Oct, 2012 12:46 pm
@roger,
Quote:
Do you have any comments on a phrase book approach to language study? And lexical chunks, for that matter


Though they have some obvious similarities, Rog, "a phrase book approach to language study" is just that, "study". It's a short term plan that is highly effective for solving a, well, short term problem.

Any approach to learning a new language should include lexical chunks because that's exactly how language works for the most effective language learners on the planet, children.

Even for advanced 2nd language learners, lexical chunks [LC] should be a big part of their practice for LCs make up a lot of everyone's daily speech.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Oct, 2012 02:45 pm
@JTT,
Thank you
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Oct, 2012 02:57 pm
@roger,
Quote:
Thank you


You're welcome/No problem/Anytime/My pleasure/...

See. Smile

What are your opinions of the same, Roger?
0 Replies
 
fresco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Oct, 2012 03:00 pm
@Complete,
So lets see.... under the names "Complete", "Bercutt" and Mike Shelby, Michael Chtcherbitski. (etc ?), you are blitzing multiple forums with the same material. Is there any reason for this other than self-publicity in lieu of published work ?
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Oct, 2012 03:09 pm
@fresco,
Quote:
Care to explain ?


An attempt to counter the onslaught of all the prescriptive nonsense maybe.
fresco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Oct, 2012 03:10 pm
@JTT,
(see my edit...I'm cynical)
fresco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Oct, 2012 03:19 pm
@JTT,
NB Michael Chtcherbitski is a Ukrainian Canadian and former English language teacher.

We've had a few retired guys here before on "missions" ! Wink
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Oct, 2012 03:21 pm
@fresco,
Smile Smile
fresco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Oct, 2012 03:44 pm
@JTT,
Hmmm....
"I have undertaken a thorough comprehensive research on the most effective methods and aids for learning English"
(sic...one of his recent articles)
0 Replies
 
 

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