21
   

I predict - Sandusky will never go to trial and never see a jail cell.

 
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2012 01:05 pm
From Amy Davidson's (a senior New Yorker editor) blog:

http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/closeread/2012/06/jerry-dottie-and-matt-sandusky.html

0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2012 01:45 pm
@JeffreyEqualityNewma,
JeffreyEqualityNewma wrote:

I believe that certain heads should roll at Penn and that those who knew about this and did nothing should be held accountable and beyond. For me that includes the late Joe Paterno. I have a dear friend who works for Penn, and this whole scandal has sickened her to the core, not only because it destroyed an institution she so dearly loved and believed in, but because she knows the good that still exists, even though all people are seeing right now is the dark and evil. I hope that they are held legally accountable and not given immunity from legal or financial consequence. Likewise, I hope that the good that does exist can blossom in the midst of this tragedy, off the playing field, because there is a whole new generation of students who have hopes and dreams at Penn State. They should not be punished or robbed of a future because of Sandusky's evilness.


Reading through this thread, this post stuck out to me, only because the fact that this person worked for Penn State has nothing to do with anything, for me.

Personally, I had never heard of Jerry Sandusky, or Joe Paterno before any of this.

This is about a child molester plain and simple.

I don't give a **** who he is, he's out of commission.

Anyone who knew, or suspected his actions and did nothing, for whatever reason, hold their share of the blame.

The message is, if you suspect, if you know.....tell.

and yes, if you suspect, tell someone. That doesn't mean at the drop of a hat, but don't bury what you think is true.

These molestors rely on the fact that others are too afraid to to put their suspictions into words for many reasons, including "but what if it's not true" and let countless children suffer.



JPB
 
  4  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2012 02:06 pm
@chai2,
Quote:
Reading through this thread, this post stuck out to me, only because the fact that this person worked for Penn State has nothing to do with anything, for me.


But it has everything to do with why he was able to get away with it for so long. I seldom agree with Hawkeye, but I do in this case. There is no minor league in football outside of college football. It's a HUGE money maker for the schools. Money talks, and in cases like this, it speaks volumes. I don't think the Sandusky abuse would have lasted nearly as long as it did if not for his association with Penn State football.
IRFRANK
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2012 02:18 pm
@JPB,
I don't agree. The fact that psu was involved no doubt increased the publicity . The situation is not isolated to college football.
JPB
 
  5  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2012 02:21 pm
@IRFRANK,
Of course it isn't isolated to college football. But, like it or not, what goes on behind the scenes in college football was part of the problem and longevity here.
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2012 02:27 pm
@JPB,
Quote:
There is no minor league in football outside of college football. It's a HUGE money maker for the schools.


It is a huge money maker because in our culture we idealize athletic greatness. Sandusky has the skill to make football greats, which earned him a halo. He then grew it when he took on the cause of throw away kids. Sandusky was brilliant, he gave us what we wanted so that he was able to get what he wanted...glory and the sexual access to boys. At the end of the day it is all of our faults that he was able to get away with it. The sickness that is going around the nation now is a result of us all knowing deep in the recesses of our minds where we dont want to go that we are collectively culpable for this evil going on under our noses for so long, that our blindness was willful.
JPB
 
  3  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2012 02:36 pm
@hawkeye10,
Nah... The **** hit the fan big time as soon as the story came to light. The collective "we" you're talking about is limited to a subset of the people who, as you say, "idealize athletic greatness". That's not all of us by any means, although I'll grant you a significant percentage of the male half of the populace.
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2012 02:40 pm
@JPB,
JPB wrote:

Nah... The **** hit the fan big time as soon as the story came to light. The collective "we" you're talking about is limited to a subset of the people who, as you say, "idealize athletic greatness". That's not all of us by any means, although I'll grant you a significant percentage of the male half of the populace.


The women put the halo on Sandusky over the last 2 decades no less than the men did. Sure, the men cared more about the football, but the women cared more about the "savior" of throw away kids. As I said, the brilliance of Sandusky is something to behold.
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2012 02:57 pm
@hawkeye10,
I prefer to reserve the use of words such as "brilliance" for things that are of a positive nature. "Brilliantly evil" isn't in my lexicon. Yes, he had how to get away with what he was doing nailed down. I don't call it brilliant, just evil.

I see that he's under a suicide watch in jail. I don't get that... why do we prevent someone who has been found guilty by a jury of his peers from committing suicide?
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2012 03:09 pm
@JPB,
Quote:
why do we prevent someone who has been found guilty by a jury of his peers from committing suicide?

Really....you dont know?

It is our Christian heritage...Only God has the right to take our life, we do not have the authority to take our own, so preventing suicide is "God's work".
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2012 03:13 pm
@JPB,
Quote:
Yes, he had how to get away with what he was doing nailed down.


If we are going to learn anything here how he got us to let him have his thrills is the place to mine.








I am not holding my breath that we will do the work. The normal American response to evil to to conduct a hanging, and then attempt to forget about it. Sure, we could hang Penn St now that we are done with Sandusky, but I doubt that we have the attention span to get it done. It certainly will not solve the problem though, only education and self awareness will get us to the promise land, and Americans tend to be dreadful at both.
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2012 03:42 pm
@JPB,
JPB wrote:

Quote:
Reading through this thread, this post stuck out to me, only because the fact that this person worked for Penn State has nothing to do with anything, for me.


But it has everything to do with why he was able to get away with it for so long. I seldom agree with Hawkeye, but I do in this case. There is no minor league in football outside of college football. It's a HUGE money maker for the schools. Money talks, and in cases like this, it speaks volumes. I don't think the Sandusky abuse would have lasted nearly as long as it did if not for his association with Penn State football.


I sure don't know that is the reason.

I can see that people more familiar with sports, university sports might see that. However, what about the many many people who get away with this very thing for decades, and are in no way famous?

They are either sneaky enough, threatening enough to their victims, or have people at all levels of their lives covering up for them.

If an adult who was molested as a child, or a child who is being molested is reading this, they would tell you that their father, brother, uncle, neighbor (or female versions of these) was not, is not caught because people who know perfectly well what is going on was/is doing nothing.

I don't believe for an instant the fact that this was some name a lot of people knew made him any more able to cover up his tracks.

It's happening this very instant.
georgeob1
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2012 03:53 pm
@IRFRANK,
IRFRANK wrote:

He clearly does not want to confront his accussers in front of a jury.

I think he will plea bargain and never go to jail.

What a travesty.

Another example of a rich man getting off when a poor man would go to jail.


It looks like you were dead wrong.
JPB
 
  3  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2012 06:08 pm
@chai2,
chai2 wrote:
They are either sneaky enough, threatening enough to their victims, or have people at all levels of their lives covering up for them.


I think this is the key point. Whether it's a university system, a religious organization, or other large financially-connected institution, I think the longevity (and number of victims) comes down to the "cost" of speaking out or looking the other way.
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2012 06:27 pm
@hawkeye10,
I occasionally take your points as discussible. But JPB already said that better.
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2012 06:29 pm
@JPB,
JPB wrote:

chai2 wrote:
They are either sneaky enough, threatening enough to their victims, or have people at all levels of their lives covering up for them.


I think this is the key point. Whether it's a university system, a religious organization, or other large financially-connected institution, I think the longevity (and number of victims) comes down to the "cost" of speaking out or looking the other way.


The key point is that this happens not just in a large financially-connected instituion, but right next door, regardless if the molester makes minimum wage, or is a multi-millionaire.

It's giving oneself a feeling of false security to think someone got away with something so long because of $$$'s.

The guy who sells you your morning cup of coffee may have been doing this to his kid for years.

Molesters all have the same tools to keep their victims from telling, and their family, friends and neighbors from talking about it.

These molesters are now having conversations with people saying that Sandusky got what he deserved, then they'll go home and have sex with their kid. Maybe with their wife and other kids in the next room.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2012 06:33 pm
@chai2,
I agree with JPB on this, but don't disagree that this goes on in other situations.

In the Penn State thing - and I have liked Penn State for various reasons not having to do with sports - there was institutional behavior, not that I will categorize that.

In every day stuff, there are similar modes.
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  2  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2012 06:42 pm
@chai2,
Surely, but if the guy next door walks in on him while in the act, what do you expect his response to be?
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2012 06:52 pm
@JPB,
JPB wrote:

Surely, but if the guy next door walks in on him while in the act, what do you expect his response to be?


He may let his neighbor convince him nothing was going on....

Happens all the time. Seriously.

chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2012 06:55 pm
@chai2,
And don't call me Shirley.
 

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