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Now that it's almost over .... what did you get up to on your thanksgiving?

 
 
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Wed 30 Nov, 2011 01:56 pm
@Butrflynet,
Some of my turkey linguini soup is in the freezer. I used the offal (sauteed giblets and heart, milk soaked liver - takes strong bitter taste out) and turkey neck for a slow cooker broth for the soup. Now that I know how to do that (never heard of sauteing giblets before), I'll remember it. I used up the dryer turkey breast leftovers by soaking them in water/salt/pepper/chile/garlic to about an inch over the turkey bits overnight in the refrigerator. That worked - and turned into turkey w mayo sandwiches.
Making asparagus potato soup (asparagus from our T dinner) tonight. Have yet to thaw/heat the dressing.. the sweet potatoes are in the freezer too.

The meal that keeps on giving!


Need to hear about the fire - I've only had one small kitchen fire a long time ago, but am ms. crazed super careful now.
0 Replies
 
shewolfnm
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Nov, 2011 02:05 pm
@Ticomaya,
http://eruditeslacker.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/acorn-squash.jpg

thats an acorn squash. They do turn orange and can be kind of squatty like a pumpkin but they are MUCH smaller. About the size of a cantaloupe
firefly
 
  3  
Reply Wed 30 Nov, 2011 02:40 pm
@Ticomaya,
Tico, you can also buy a kosher turkey--those have already been soaked in a brine solution. I tried that two years ago and the bird was moist, but I personally find the brine gives the turkey too salty a taste.

I've roasted turkeys both with and without the tin foil tent--I really haven't found that it makes much difference.

The problem with roasting a turkey is that the breast cooks much more quickly than the dark meat--when the breast is cooked to 161 degrees, the dark meat in the deepest part of the thigh may not be fully cooked to a safe-to-eat temperature.
Covering the breast with foil during the last part of the roasting helps somewhat, but the breast still keeps cooking. Basting the outside of the turkey does nada for the inside of the turkey, and continually opening the oven door, to do the basting, just lowers the oven temperature so you don't maintain a consistent temperature.

I've been happiest with fresh turkeys rather than frozen birds. They aren't frozen rock hard and they seem to be the moistest when cooked without much fuss to insure that. This year's bird really came out perfectly cooked.

And the digital probe thermometers, with the wire that runs to the outside of the oven where the thermometer read-out sits, are just wonderful. You insert the probe into the bird and set the external thermometer (which sits on the top of the stove) for the internal temperature you want and, when the bird reaches that temp, an alarm sounds. They are a goof-proof method of roasting almost anything to the right degree of doneness and you never have to open the oven door to check on the internal temperature. They are a great investment for any cook.

This year I was very happy that everything turned out great with a minimum of fuss and bother because I did as much as possible as far in advance as possible. I make my own cranberry sauce (a combination of cooked cranberries, sugar, grated orange peel, diced and crushed fresh orange, crushed pineapple, and chopped walnuts) at least two days in advance because the flavors then have time to blend together. I made my secret recipe stuffing the night before Thanksgiving so it was ready to go in the bird in the morning. I cooked the candied sweet potatoes combined with sliced Granny Smith apples the night before Thanksgiving and just reheated them in the oven the next day while my cooked turkey was resting, and, while the sweet potatoes were re-heating, I steamed the frozen baby Brussels sprouts and frozen baby string beans and toasted slivered almonds in the microwave just before serving them. This is basically the same main meal we have every Thanksgiving, and, for us, it wouldn't be Thanksgiving without these traditional items.

The day before Thanksgiving I baked brownies topped with a layer of cheesecake, then additionally topped them off with drained cherry pie filling, and cut them into pop-in-the-mouth large bite sized pieces, I arranged my cookie platter, and purchased a bakery made caramel drizzled apple pie that had raisins and walnuts in the filling. We enjoyed these goodies with coffee and tea about an hour after the main meal. Immediately after the meal, I served a light dessert of sorbet topped with mixed frozen fruit I had thawed and macerated in a little Grand Marnier.

We had cooked shrimp, canned smoked oysters, matjes herring bites in wine sauce, marinated mushrooms, and flavored cheese spreads and cubed cheese pieces, with assorted crackers, before the meal while we chatted, enjoyed some wine, took photos, and more or less watched the 1947 movie, "Miracle on 34th Street' on the telly. After the meal, some men watched football, while some dozed in a food stupor, and the ladies helped re-organize the kitchen and yakked at the dining room table. The guests all happily took home doggie bags so they could enjoy leftovers too. The dog enjoyed the cooked giblets, but she passed on the turkey.

To say that our Thanksgiving focuses mainly on eating, in a way that is nothing short of gluttony, is a mild understatement, but planning, and organizing, and shopping, and enjoying it all with family and friends, is part of what I love about this particular holiday, and I really don't knock myself out with that much cooking. It's designed to celebrate bounty and enjoy it with others, and that's just what we do, and I'm thankful we are able to do that. I'm also thankful that Thanksgiving doesn't come more than once a year. Laughing


Irishk
 
  3  
Reply Wed 30 Nov, 2011 03:13 pm
@Ticomaya,
It wasn't even fire dept.-worthy (for which we are thankful lol). My sister, who I put in charge of the gravy, started it. The funniest part was us girls running back and forth in the kitchen yelling and carrying flaming objects out the back door and the guys watching the game not ten feet away never even looked up lol.

(Never use a tea-towel to smother a grease fire lol -- they are highly flammable)!
firefly
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Nov, 2011 04:29 pm
@Irishk,
You just reminded me I have to buy a new fire extinguisher to keep in my kitchen. The one I currently have is very old.
Linkat
 
  2  
Reply Wed 30 Nov, 2011 04:41 pm
@Irishk,
My aunt once started a fire at our house on Christmas - no it wasn't the gravy - she lit a piece of tissue paper while unwrapping a gift on fire - she must have got so excited she waved the paper in front of a candle. she began running around and waving the thing - we had to grab it from her and put it in the sink.

Auntie is no longer allowed to be near an open flame.
0 Replies
 
Ticomaya
 
  2  
Reply Wed 30 Nov, 2011 05:00 pm
@Irishk,
Irishk wrote:
It wasn't even fire dept.-worthy (for which we are thankful lol). My sister, who I put in charge of the gravy, started it. The funniest part was us girls running back and forth in the kitchen yelling and carrying flaming objects out the back door and the guys watching the game not ten feet away never even looked up lol.

Your story just reminded me that we had a fire in our kitchen on Thanksgiving also. It was minor, so easy to forget. My wife decided to toast the marshmallows on her yam dish, so she put them in the toaster oven.

And forgot about them.

Eventually, my oldest son came into the kitchen and said: "Mom, your yams are on fire."
Ticomaya
 
  2  
Reply Wed 30 Nov, 2011 05:00 pm
@shewolfnm,
shewolfnm wrote:
thats an acorn squash. They do turn orange and can be kind of squatty like a pumpkin but they are MUCH smaller. About the size of a cantaloupe

Sorry ... mine was a cross-thread reference:

http://able2know.org/topic/68484-453#post-4806036
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  2  
Reply Wed 30 Nov, 2011 05:01 pm
@shewolfnm,
Here's the Cook's Thesaurus's take on winter squash and their various substitutes.

http://www.foodsubs.com/Squash.html
0 Replies
 
Irishk
 
  3  
Reply Wed 30 Nov, 2011 05:35 pm
@Ticomaya,
Ticomaya wrote:
"Mom, your yams are on fire."

That's hilarious! And that's what holidays are all about -- making memories lol.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Wed 30 Nov, 2011 05:50 pm
@firefly,
Turkey is a lurkey bird. The best one I've ever tasted was sort of a mistake, just an experiment doing spatchcocking, sort of like the thread that comes up once in a while by me, Giulliano Bugialli's lemon chicken, which is butterflied and very easy. I followed a Mark Bittman recipe which I think was originally from Martha Stewart, a woman my friends and I used to make fun of long ago; might have posted on it. Not only was it the best tasting, but it took much less time. I can't remember if I went organic, yadda yadda, I watch dollars, but it wasn't a butterball, was relatively small, thinking eleven or twelve pounds. I mention this since my good big roasting pan might have limits re a really big turkey spatchcocked.

My next effort will be a capon - they have them at the good butcher shop here, Keller's. Capon sammiches, anyone?
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Nov, 2011 05:55 pm
@firefly,
Mine too. They can - or used to be able to be - recharged either with the fire dept or some hardware stores (I think). Maybe Home Depot, I should look it up. Baking soda is always on my counter. Thing is to not let it all cake up from moisture, aka, wet counter..
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Nov, 2011 05:58 pm
@Ticomaya,
Chow.com has a remedy for that..

(they have this series where they give solutions for kitchen disaster)
anyway, simply lift off the offensive burnt yuck and start again - or other advice if it's too far gone.
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Nov, 2011 06:04 pm
@ossobuco,
Quote:
Capon sammiches, anyone?


No thanks osso. I heard they caused Kentucky droop.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Nov, 2011 06:06 pm
@spendius,
Is that what happens to horses?
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Nov, 2011 06:14 pm
@ossobuco,
Not all of them. Just the ones that can't gallop past the stables where the fillies are.... well....er....er..... stabled.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Nov, 2011 07:04 pm
@spendius,
This is a bit non sequiturish to me. There must be something I don't know yet.

Do they geld in filly stables? er, servicing area?

Now that would be mean.
0 Replies
 
Ticomaya
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Nov, 2011 08:30 pm
@ossobuco,
ossobuco wrote:
Chow.com has a remedy for that..

(they have this series where they give solutions for kitchen disaster)
anyway, simply lift off the offensive burnt yuck and start again - or other advice if it's too far gone.

It happened twice (it seems Ms. Tico was multi-tasking that day). The first time the marshmallows merely burned. After they caught fire on the second attempt, we ate marshmallow-free yams.
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Nov, 2011 08:37 pm
@Ticomaya,
That sounds a very satisfactory outcome to me, Tico. Wink
0 Replies
 
robinekin
 
  1  
Reply Thu 1 Dec, 2011 09:01 am
@msolga,
nice culture for thanksgiving,however,we don't have special day for thanksgiving.
0 Replies
 
 

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