7
   

Do you trust imported products?

 
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 02:29 pm
@Robert Gentel,
Quote:
Your reading comprehension is reprehensible, I did not criticize you at all.

I read for forensic presentation and you committed several sins of commission by starting off lecturing me about some rod youve had up your ass. Go away and play hall monitor somewhere else.
Obviously uou arent used to thinking about what youve written actually sounds like before hitting the send button.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 03:17 pm
Staying out of this except to say that imports vary. I have bought some wares from China that I'm pleased by - just recently a sturdy and good looking glass from the dollar store in Albuquerque, New Mexico. After the "toothpaste" episode, I'd be wary of any kind of chinese pharmaceuticals, beauty products, or the like - but possibly not forever, as I also remember the change in respect for japanese products. The tainted dog food with a chinese provided bad additive was frightening to learn about.

Corners will be cut in businesses throughout the world. I think when a company or a country's manufacturing gets respect through the repeated usefulness and wearability of its products that that is a kind of treasury for the company or the country. Deserved reputations matter. Businesses can go in different directions and can hide inferiority for only so long; conversely, superior products get known.

At the same time, there is a reverse to this for those businesses that have high quality:
It must be difficult for some manufacturers - I'm thinking of venerable italian textile businesses - to compete with the cheap. Made in Italy has been a good marker on products for quite a while now, but apparently the city of Prato has chinese immigrant manufacturers playing on the made in italy thing. Not that I personally know their products are poorly made. I used to have links both on the difficulty the venerable textile firms are having now and the manufacturing going on in Prato, but I've lost those links. And Italy has plenty of shoddy stuff going on. My take is that humans are much the same, and I am for certain levels of regulation to go along with the power of high regard for a good product.

0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  2  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 05:52 pm
Having read the reports of contamination of seafood products imported from China & Vietnam, I no longer buy them. (Though things can become a bit tricky about what's safe to buy when some fresh seafood produce is labeled as "a mixture of local & imported products" ... with no reference to the source of the imported component in the mix.)

But I was wondering about garlic, as I use quite a bit of it in my cooking. The home-grown variety costs way more than the imported Chinese variety. I recently read that garlic is one of China's most profitable exports, which wouldn't surprise me ... our local greengrocer shops & supermarkets appear to seem to be flooded with Chinese garlic.

Recently I read this article which raised my concerns. Any comments on the veracity of the claims of contamination?
Also, are there any controls on Chinese imported garlic on health/contamination grounds in the US and other countries? (According to this article Europe does not accept imported garlic, though whether this is for health or trade reasons I don't know.)

Quote:
Conventionally Grown Garlic Contaminated With Chemicals
Monday, March 10, 2008 by: Lynn Berry

http://www.naturalnews.com/gallery/webseed/garlic.jpg

Garlic is recognised as a valuable ingredient in maintaining a healthy life and combating disease. However what looks to be perfectly natural could in fact be treated with chemicals. So the question is where is your garlic from and how has it been treated?

The bulk of the world's garlic is produced in China where the cost of labour significantly reduces the cost of manual processing that garlic requires. For this reason, in those countries that accept imported garlic (including USA, Australia but not Europe), buying imported garlic is cheaper.

Despite this, Chinese garlic does not meet with food safety protocols (at least those in Australia). According to Henry Bell of the Australian Garlic Industry Association, garlic from China is doused in chemicals to stop sprouting, to whiten garlic, and to kill insects and plant matter. He also reports that garlic is grown in untreated sewage (http://www.theage.com.au/news/epicu...) .

Garlic can be whitened by using chlorine or with a mixture of sulphur and wood ash. Whitening garlic helps to make it look healthier and more attractive to consumers. In fact this obsession with white foods has lead to the bleaching of many food products (flour, salt, sugar) using chlorine dioxide or benzoyl peroxide.

Growth inhibitors are used to stop garlic from sprouting and can be made from hormones or chemicals. When garlic begins to sprout, the garlic clove loses much of its potency. Growth inhibitors together with gamma irradiation extend the shelf life of garlic.

Gamma radiation is also used to sterilise many products, and in Australia, this treatment is not accepted for foodstuffs. This does not prevent food treated by gamma radiation to enter the country.

Australia also requires that all garlic regardless of origin is fumigated with methyl bromide at entry to Australia. Methyl bromide is a colourless gas and a potent chemical used as an insecticide, fungicide and herbicide.

It has a variety of uses: in controlling pests, weeds and soil-borne diseases associated with crops and timber products; in protecting stored grains and dried fruit; in industrial feedstock; in refrigerant; as a fire extinguishing agent; for degreasing wool; and for extracting oils from nuts, seeds and flowers (http://www.apvma.gov.au/chemrev/met...) .

Methyl bromide is listed as an ozone depleting substance and, under the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, its use is prohibited. According to the UN it is 60 times more damaging than chlorine and is the base of CFCs (Chlorofluorocarbons). However exemptions have been allowed and that includes the use of methyl bromide for quarantine purposes and feedstock applications.

If inhaled or absorbed through the skin, methyl bromide is toxic to both humans and animals causing chemical burns, kidney damage and damage to the central nervous system. ...<cont>


http://www.naturalnews.com/022801.html
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 07:34 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:
...you committed several sins of commission by starting off lecturing me about some rod youve had up your ass.


I didn't lecture you at all. I didn't even make a single comment on a anything you said. And I can't be blamed that you are just too senile to tell the difference.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 07:40 pm
@msolga,
msolga wrote:
Having read the reports of contamination of seafood products imported from China & Vietnam, I no longer buy them.


seafood, honey, fruits, vegetables, basically any food products that I can't source the origins - it's not coming into the house. it gets tricky, but after the pet food debacle I can't see how it's not worth the effort. I support local farmers as much as possible, get honey only from apiarists I (or family/friends) have met in person, that sort of thing. Garlic is one of the things that I get at farmers' markets as long as the season lets me. For a number of years I was relying on garlic chives I grew myself, but we really like garlic so had to buy the real stuff again.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 08:45 pm
@ehBeth,
This is all reminding me - in California I planted garlic in the spring and I think people plant it here in NM right now, and mulch a bit. Better get myself to a proper nursery or feed store soon. Wonder where Home Depot's garlic sets come from.. I'd be fine with garlic sets from Mexico - I'll have to do some local store research.
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 09:07 pm
@ossobuco,
I think I should start growing my own garlic too, osso.
I might post something on one of the gardening threads to gain a better understanding of how to gain the best results.
It's something I haven't done before, but never too late to learn!


I just noticed the tags on this thread & I noticed a couple of references to Armenia. Which perplexed me a bit, so I Googled Armenia + food imports + health concerns & this is one of the responses I received:

Cucumber killers: Armenia bans import of vegetables from Europe and Turkey:
http://www.armenianow.com/special_issues/health/30053/armenia_halts_import_cucumber

I just wondered ... have there been similar bans on vegetable imports from Europe & Turkey from other countries?

.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 09:16 pm
@ossobuco,
Rule of thumb for garlic is to plant it in late fall and harvest in early summer. I always plant the hard stemmers cause it gives a spring treat with the "scape". These scapes are like a "ramp" in their intense garlicky flavor and we use them for toppings and julienned for accompanying with certain dishes.

You can get hard necks at most good seed companies (I used to get my chiles at the Santa Fe seed Co.)

In Australia msolga should begin her garlic in May and HArvest it in Mid December.
Garlic is counter intuitive in its growth habit. Think of them like you would fancy tulips or hyacinths. They will not set multi cloved bulbs unless they have a short rooting period before winter. They actually grow in winter until the ground is deeply frozen then they lie dormant and kick in as soon as the ground defrosts. In places like Albaturkey where your winters arent that bad, you can grow some nice hard stemmers.

PS, We like hard stem garlic cause ithas a much stronger "garlicky" taste.

_______Methyl Bromide was a fumigant that was applied by the SImplot folks in Calif San Juaquin valley. The Calif Water Board banned it in the 70's. China picked up alot of our old practices
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 10:28 pm
@farmerman,
Well, my spring planted garlic came out fine in california, farmer, with multicloves. That can vary by climate, I've read.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 10:50 pm
@ossobuco,
Quote:

In preparation for planting, garlic beds are normally treated with a pre-emergent herbicide. Growers
typically plant garlic from mid September through November. Bed size is 40 inches, and the garlic seed is
planted in double rows at a density of approximately 18 plants/foot. The garlic is then irrigated with
overhead sprinklers until stand establishment, then furrow irrigated
This is from the Calif Garlic Advisory Board. (What can you advise garlics about?).
According to them, they dont grow the hard stems because of the scapes and the way the things must dry in the field too long. SO, softneck seems to be the preferred "seed". Most f Calif seed comes from Waay north state or Nevada. The Calif San Juaquin WAS the big garlic growing center, now it seems to be more northern states with a more extreme photo period. States like NY and Wisconsin grow garlic and onions. Calif's preeminence has slipped as China took over the market.
I saw that the Gilroy area, once the US center for garlic production, is now pretty much garlic-free except for "Seed" production (Which IS spring grown garlic . Usually spring grown garlic produces less than 5 cloves while a fall grown one will be producing 20 or more.
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 11:28 pm
@farmerman,
Quote:
You can get hard necks at most good seed companies (I used to get my chiles at the Santa Fe seed Co.)

AKA High Country Gardens - they have a mail order catalog as well as a local ABQ store over by HWY 25 and Osuna.
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 11:29 pm
@Butrflynet,
Never mind, just checked their website and it looks like they don't sell garlic bulbs.
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 11:32 pm
@msolga,
Repeating the concerns from my earlier post (above).
Can anyone supply any up to date information?

Quote:
Recently I read this article which raised my concerns. Any comments on the veracity of the claims of contamination?
Also, are there any controls on Chinese imported garlic on health/contamination grounds in the US and other countries? (According to this article Europe does not accept imported garlic, though whether this is for health or trade reasons I don't know.)
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Nov, 2011 11:40 pm
@Butrflynet,
Burpee has 16 varieties in their catalog. Here's a link to the garlic page on their website. I've had nothing but success with the plants, bulbs and seeds I've gotten from them the last three years, especially their onion sets. We had onions coming out our ears this summer.

http://www.burpee.com/product/categoryMedium.jsp?catId=2018&pageNum=0&pageSize=60&facetTrail=&sort=default&_requestid=1140002
0 Replies
 
 

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