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Will you offer allergy-free candy this Halloween?

 
 
Reply Fri 28 Oct, 2011 02:54 pm
Quote:
Yes, all my candy is allergen-free. 31% (31 votes)


I will have a separate bowl of allergen-free candy. 13% (13 votes)


I will have options, but not separate bowls. 15% (15 votes)


No. 38% (38 votes)


Other 3% (3 votes)



Total Votes: 100

http://eatocracy.cnn.com/2011/10/28/no-tricks-this-halloween-just-allergy-friendly-treats/?hpt=hp_c1

I voted no because I am fed up with all of this sniveling about food allergies, but I do serve only Airheads so I guess I conform to the standard on accident.
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Type: Question • Score: 3 • Views: 1,761 • Replies: 16
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hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Oct, 2011 03:06 pm
Quote:
Jenny Kales spent the last few hours of a recent Halloween night scraping from her front stoop the peanut butter candies that trick-or-treaters had dropped in their dashes from door to door. She's not an obsessive cleaner, mind you, just a mother of a child with a food allergy.

A Reese's peanut butter cup can be more than a mess. It can be life-threatening.

Kales, 41 of La Grange Park, Ill., has written the Nut-Free Mom Blog (nut-freemom.blogspot.com) for the past three years as a way to process her feelings about her daughter Alexandra's nut allergy. Blogging also enables the freelance writer to share the knowledge she has accumulated since Alexandra, now 11, bit into a peanut butter sandwich in preschool and went into shock.

"I didn't know anyone else in my situation," she says. "It's a scary time."

Nut allergies are scary for the kids, too. The scariest time of all is Halloween, when kids expect to trick-or-treat with their friends, regardless of their ability to process nut proteins.

"When I was younger I was always nervous about eating the wrong thing or not getting anything that was OK for me to eat," says Alexandra, a sixth-grader who double-checks labels before popping any candy in her mouth.

Her mother recently devoted a blog post to Halloween tips for parents. Carry two candy bags, she wrote. "One is for 'possibles' ... candies you will review with your child when you get home, and one is for 'unsafe' candies."

Next, she advised moms and dads to fill kids' bellies before they leave the house.

"Take a hungry child with a food allergy and dangle some Halloween candy before them — are they going to be tempted? Most likely. So don't let that happen."

Kales told parents of nut-allergic kids to provide nearby neighbors with safe candy they can distribute to the little monsters who ring their doorbells.

And when all else fails, advised the blogger, trade with other kids. "First, we swap 'unsafe' candies with our child's friends who don't have allergies. Most kids are willing to give up their lollipops, gum and other 'safe' candies for my daughter's unwanted Reese's, Snickers and other nut-filled chocolate treats. Secondly, we tell our daughter that she can turn in any unsafe candy to us for a 'safe' treat bag. I fill it with nut-free chocolate ... and some inedibles such as some lip balm, a book or maybe some inexpensive Halloween earrings."

Kales touts allergy-friendly products, like Vermont Nut-Free Chocolate (vermontnutfree.com), whose sales have increased in recent years.

"Many more kids are being stricken with this allergy, and their parents don't want to take any chances," explains Mark Elvidge, company vice president.

The National Institutes of Health estimate that almost 5 percent of children younger than 5 and almost 4 percent of kids 5 — 17 deal with food allergies.

Dr. Rachel Robison, attending physician in the Division of Allergy and Immunology at Children's Memorial Hospital, confirms that food allergies in general are on the rise, though she cautions that these findings could be the result of better testing, more awareness or even the hygiene hypothesis, which theorizes that we have gotten too clean as a culture, causing our immune systems to "get bored" and begin acting abnormally.

Robison and her colleagues treat the spectrum of abnormalities — nut-allergic responses that range from mild rashes to anaphylactic shock characterized by vomiting, lethargy, even the cessation of breathing.

It's serious stuff, heightened during this holiday: Your chocolate got in my peanut butter! Your peanut butter got in my allergic kid!

Alex Dankowski is such a kid — allergic to peanuts and tree nuts. He's going trick-or-treating as a ninja this year. Along with his sword and nun-chucks he'll be carrying a pair of Epinephrine-injecting EpiPens (the backup pen is there in the event that the first fails or one dose isn't enough).

The 9-year-old admits that he wishes he could eat Snickers and Reese's cups — his classmates at Disney II Magnet School in Chicago's Old Irving Park neighborhood tell him they taste great — but he's happy to stick to the safe stuff. "I like Starburst and lollipops," he says.

"(On Halloween) we never eat anything homemade. We never eat anything unknown. And we don't mess around with chocolate," explains mom Caroline, a registered nurse who has provided tutorials to Chicago Park District employees on administering EpiPens in the event of allergic reactions. "But Alex can eat one piece of known candy while he's trick-or-treating."

Neither the mothers nor the doctor has heard of any towns attempting to regulate the candy residents distribute to trick-or-treaters.

"If anybody tried to do that there would be public outcry," surmises blogger Kales. "But we have noticed more self-regulation in the past few years. And we're seeing a lot more nonedible things — people giving out pencils. Little by little, people are making an effort, which we appreciate

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/health/2016611734_allergies28.html

Well now, that is one sure fired way to finish the job of killing off Halloween for kids! It reminds me of how we did a hell of a job to kill off the playground by making them "safe"...thus assuring that kids dont want to visit these now boring places.
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Oct, 2011 03:10 pm
I haven't handed out stuff for Halloween trick or treaters for at least 25 years, so I'd vote for none of the above.
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Oct, 2011 03:12 pm
@Butrflynet,
Butrflynet wrote:

I haven't handed out stuff for Halloween trick or treaters for at least 25 years, so I'd vote for none of the above.
are you morally opposed?
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Oct, 2011 04:06 pm
No. If kids are allergic, their parents can sort it out. I get 10 kids, if I'm lucky, so having 3 bowls is stupid. But even if it weren't, it's not my problem. Some of the kids I grew up with were allergic and there was no whining whatsoever. They knew what they could and couldn't eat. I had a friend who was allergic to grass and oranges (among 1000000 other things) and she still played field hockey.

And then are you supposed to cater to kids with PKU and god knows what else?
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Oct, 2011 04:06 pm
@hawkeye10,
It never crossed my mind before now, and it shall leave my mind shortly after I post this comment.

If a kid can differentiate between allergen-free and allergen laden candy it means they have a parent who will be screening their take to remove the bad stuff.

Whether or not my home will provide something which the allergic young'in can eat is not something I will know, nor care to determine

My goal on Halloween is to be the house the kids all advise their friends not to miss: "Mr. Finn is giving out_____"

We buy a lot because I dispense it in handfuls.

It will be a shame if some boy or girl who is allergic to peanuts can't enjoy the three full size Snickers bars I drop in their bag, but they can always trade them to their friends for allergen-free Smarties.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Oct, 2011 04:15 pm
@hawkeye10,
I've gone the tree-nut free treat route for the past mmmmmm 28 years.

Usually three bowls.

One bowl of "big" treats - either nut-free candy bars or chips or cheesies. One bowl of smaller candy treats - sweet-tarts/nibs/chiclets/gummy brains. One bowl of things - rings/pencils/ghost erasers/rubber spiders. The deal is one big thing/one handful from the bowl of little stuff/one thing or a combo. The 4 - 8 group really seems to love picking ... sometimes it takes a while, but that's ok if they're having fun.

There's also usually a secret stash of something like Red Hots for parents toting around babies. One year I was also the local viral marketer of a new Tetley tea.

I've got dance class on Hallowe'en this year, so the Irish guy will be in charge of handing out handfuls of treats.
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Oct, 2011 04:42 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
Quote:
It will be a shame if some boy or girl who is allergic to peanuts can't enjoy the three full size Snickers bars I drop in their bag, but they can always trade them to their friends for allergen-free Smarties.
ONe of the pieces I read indicated that for some bad candy will spoil the whole bag even if it is not opened, but I got to think that level of allergy is unusual. My kids always came back and dumped their bags to sort what they wanted from what they did not, after which the trading commenced. Anything that no one wanted went into the family candy bowl for visitors. I cant see why we gifters should be the least bit concerned about the allergy status of the trick or treaters.
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Oct, 2011 05:07 pm
@hawkeye10,
It started while living in Richmond, CA. I used to get literally hundreds of kids of all ages every year. One year I posted a sign on my porch with a small bowl of candy. The sign said "I can't afford much candy this year and your parents can't afford the dentist bills. Let's help each other and just take one piece of candy per person. Thanks for understanding."

The kids were great about it. I could hear them reading the sign aloud to each other as they approached the door. Also heard many comments of "she's right" and them scolding each other for taking more than one piece.

After that, I just stopped handing out candy completely. I darkened the lights and didn't answer the door. Been that way every where I've lived since then.

The handing out of candy profits the sugar (and related) industries. It doesn't benefit the giver or the receiver of the candy. In most cases, you never see the trick or treaters at any other time of year and have no idea who they are.
0 Replies
 
Ceili
 
  2  
Reply Fri 28 Oct, 2011 05:17 pm
I love Hell 'o' ween.. I totally get a benefit out of it. I dress up, decorate and I love the costumes and interacting with the kids and their parents.
I have nut allergies so I always try to accommodate those that are. I give out chips and gum and chocolate and I get smiles back.
Win Win.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Oct, 2011 05:39 pm
So much stuff is processed in factories that "also process nuts" that I would never even try to present any type of candy as safe. Parents of nut allergy kids need to be the ones who guard against dangerous treats.

We get a lot of trick or treaters too. It's a steady stream and i would never have time to find out which kid need/wants what.

We have a friend whose kid has a very serious nut allergy so I do always have something special for her though.
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Mon 31 Oct, 2011 11:16 pm
So, I only had about 50 last year, and so instead of running 4 miles to the other side of town to get the Air Heads that I usually get I decided to go to Costco and get boxes of full sized Reese's peanut Butter Cups double packs. The ninnies should take that as getting the finger. The kids were thrilled though....
Ceili
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Nov, 2011 12:21 am
@boomerang,
We have a major candy company that has a nut free plant. Nestle, so it can be trusted.
0 Replies
 
Ceili
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Nov, 2011 12:23 am
@hawkeye10,
Ninnies??? WTF, a nut allergy can be deadly. I'm glad you gave the finger to little kids, one day I hope they share the love. Maybe they'll kick you to the curb when you have a heart attack in the street. One can only hope. What an ass.
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Nov, 2011 12:29 am
@Ceili,
Quote:
a nut allergy can be deadly.
Hopefully by the time the kid reaches trick or treat age the parents have figured this out, and thus have the opportunity to take appropriate action. It is not my problem.
Ceili
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Nov, 2011 12:59 am
@hawkeye10,
No, as yours is being an ass.
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Nov, 2011 01:24 am
@Ceili,
Ceili wrote:

No, as yours is being an ass.
Which is defined as getting uppity after you have laid out your instructions......
0 Replies
 
 

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