14
   

Here are the issues that could beat Texas' Rick Perry

 
 
Reply Sat 13 Aug, 2011 10:48 am
Texas ' governor Rick Perry is not the most powerful government member, unlike most other states. The Lieutenant Governor has more power than the governor. This was demonstrated when George W. Bush was governor.

The executive branch consists of the Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Comptroller of Public Accounts, Land Commissioner, Attorney General, Agriculture Commissioner, the three-member Texas Railroad Commission, the State Board of Education, and the Secretary of State. The comptroller decides if expected state income is sufficient to cover the proposed state budget. There are also many state agencies and numerous boards and commissions. Partly because of many elected officials, the governor's powers are quite limited in comparison to other state governors or the U.S. President. In popular lore and belief the lieutenant governor, who heads the Senate and appoints its committees, has more power than the governor. The governor commands the state militia and can veto bills passed by the Legislature and call special sessions of the Legislature (this power is exclusive to the governor and can be exercised as often as desired). The governor also appoints members of various executive boards and fills judicial vacancies between elections.

Other Perry vulnerabilities:

August 12, 2011
Here are the issues that could beat Texas' Rick Perry
By Maria Recio | McClatchy Newspapers

WASHINGTON — Texas Gov. Rick Perry enters the Republican presidential primary campaign Saturday as a formidable candidate with a strong message on jobs creation, but he also has some vulnerabilities likely to surface from his long tenure as governor.

"Everything's fair game," said Austin, Texas, political consultant Bill Miller, who has Democratic and Republican clients.

Perry's Republican opponents barely touched his impending candidacy at Thursday's debate in Iowa, but once Perry officially announces Saturday in South Carolina, expect them — and Democrats, too — to step up their criticisms.

Here, then, are some likely flash points:

Vaccinations for girls — In 2007, Perry issued an executive order requiring Texas girls entering the sixth grade to be vaccinated against a sexually transmitted virus, the human papillomavirus. The outcry from parents and lawmakers that mandating Gardasil, a Merck & Co. vaccine, amounted to state interference in parental decisions led the Texas Legislature to rescind his order. Perry has maintained that the vaccinations were voluntary.

Amid the controversy were charges of cronyism because Perry's former chief of staff, Mike Toomey, was a Merck lobbyist. Perry denied any favoritism.

Trans-Texas Corridor — Perry introduced the ambitious concept in 2002 of a network of corridors linking major Texas cities, with toll roads for cars and trucks, tracks for freight and passenger rail, and rights of way for power lines and pipelines. But the $175 billion, 4,000-mile network was immediately controversial, as Perry signed a contract with a Spanish consortium to build it and then used eminent domain powers to acquire private land. After sustained public opposition, the state abandoned the large-scale project — and its name, which had become toxic — in 2009 in favor of some highways and smaller projects.

Texas debt/economy — Texas critics of Perry say that while the state may claim 37 percent of net job creation in the country since June 2009, according to the Dallas Federal Reserve, the jobs are low-paying and that even then the governor shouldn't take the credit.

"The narrative about Texas jobs' miracle dissolves," said Craig McDonald, the director of Texans for Public Justice, an Austin-based watchdog group. "The price of oil is responsible and really helped our economy."

Democrats are vocal about the state's rising debt, which grew from $13.4 billion to $37.8 billion from 2001 to 2010, according to the Texas Bond Review Board.

"The number one issue he's vulnerable on is debt," said Matt Angle, the director of the Lone Star Project, a Democratic research group. "When he took office it was zero. That goes against his message of fiscal responsibility." The state budget must be balanced by law, but the state may still incur bond obligations.

But Perry has been resilient against such criticism — since the budget is balanced — and McDonald thinks the economy argument may not fly with the Republican primary voters. "I think he has very few vulnerabilities among the primary electorate," McDonald said. "It's going to be hard to find a weakness that sticks to Rick Perry in the primary."

Texas fatigue — A less-tangible but frequent comment about Perry's candidacy is about his "Texas-ness." Less than three years after another Texan left the White House, some political observers wonder whether the country is ready for another president from the Lone Star State, especially since George W. Bush was so unpopular after his two-term presidency.

"Oh, it's real," Larry Sabato, the director of the University of Virginia's Center for Politics, said of the fatigue factor. "But not in the Republican primary. Among Republicans, Bush still has an overwhelmingly positive image."

Perry, for his part, has used the can-do, go-it-alone perception of the state to his advantage and reveled in his pro-Texas, anti-Washington image.

Wealthy donors and influence — Texas finance laws allow unlimited individual campaign contributions — in contrast to the $2,500 per election federal limit — and Perry has benefited from what are known as "mega-donors," who give $100,000 or more to his campaigns.

Almost half of the $102.8 million that Perry raised from 2001 through 2010 came from 204 such mega-donors, according to an analysis by Texans for Public Justice.

Perry's largest contributor is homebuilder Bob Perry (no relation), who with his wife has given $2.5 million to the governor's campaigns over the last 10 years. (Bob Perry also contributed more than $4 million to the "Swift Boat Veterans for Truth" ad campaign against 2004 Democratic presidential nominee John Kerry.) The governor's office says the homebuilder has never asked for any favors.

Environmentalists charge that another large Perry contributor, Dallas billionaire Harold Simmons — who gave him $1.1 million over 10 years — benefits from Perry influence in getting state approvals to expand a low-level radioactive waste site in West Texas to receive waste from other states.

Read more: http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2011/08/12/120509/texas-perry-to-enter-presidential.html#ixzz1UvVQsT00
 
H2O MAN
 
  -3  
Reply Sat 13 Aug, 2011 11:45 am


Someday a white man's gonna to be elected President again.
farmerman
 
  4  
Reply Sat 13 Aug, 2011 12:27 pm
@H2O MAN,
So keep your sheets and hood all spiffied up spurt.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Aug, 2011 12:58 pm
You cannot imagine how it distresses me that Perry has a good shot at the White House. I would prefer to vote GW Bush back, instead.
maxdancona
 
  2  
Reply Sat 13 Aug, 2011 01:39 pm
@edgarblythe,
Rick Perry only has a "good shot" if there are too many reasonable people who decide not to vote.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Aug, 2011 01:40 pm
Rick Perry has a good shot at it. Period.
0 Replies
 
Eva
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Aug, 2011 01:49 pm
@edgarblythe,
edgarblythe wrote:

You cannot imagine how it distresses me that Perry has a good shot at the White House. I would prefer to vote GW Bush back, instead.


He's that bad, edgar?
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  3  
Reply Sat 13 Aug, 2011 01:51 pm


Austin, Texas (CNN) -- As a resident of Texas for 36 years, I keep wondering why the rest of the nation pays any attention to our political and cultural absurdities and yet still chooses Texans as presidents. Our most revered historical moment, the Alamo, was arguably a mass suicide. The slaughter in San Antonio was followed by a massacre at Goliad, the fall of the Confederacy to Union forces, and later by the Houston Astros. Texas has a legacy of losing.

None of this apparently matters, though, because America is beginning the process of electing another Texan to be president. Gigantic tax breaks for the wealthy and corporations, a trumped up war and a ruined economy from the last Texan seem incapable of dissuading supporters of Rick Perry.

His Saturday speech in South Carolina will make clear that he is entering the race for the White House and will spawn the ugliest and most expensive presidential race in U.S. history, and he will win. A C and D student, who hates to govern, loves to campaign, and barely has a sixth grader's understanding of economics, will lead our nation into oblivion.

But I'm getting ahead of myself.

Politics: Rick Perry surges in poll

The big brains gathered east of the Hudson and Potomac Rivers believe that Mitt Romney is the candidate to beat. But they are unable to hear what Rick Perry is saying. The Christian prayer rally in Houston was a very loud proclamation to fundamentalists and Teavangelicals, which said, "I am not a Mormon." The far right and Christian fundamentalists have an inordinate amount of influence in the GOP primary process and, regardless of messages of inclusion, very few of them will vote for a Mormon.


James Moore"We think a them Mormons as bein' in kind of a cult," one of the Houston rally attendees told me. "I couldn't vote for one a them when we got a real Christian like Governor Perry runnin'."

Perry, of course, can't come right out and print bumper stickers that say, "Rick Perry -- 2012 -- Not a Mormon." But he doesn't have to. He's wearing his faith like a power tie while Romney stays quiet as a tabernacle mouse on the topic of religion. Romney has business experience and intellect that are not on Perry's resume' but he is from "Massatoositts," (Webster's Texas Edition, see also "Massachusetts"), and Texans love to kick their political boots into New Englanders' squishy parts. Perry is about to remind the tea partiers and fundamentalists that Romney created a state health care plan, (the horror, affordable health care for everyone), believes global warming is real, and has a troubling history for conservatives on the matters of abortion and gay marriage.

So much for Mitt.



Moore: Perry could get GOP nomination

Praying away the bad economy

The audacity of Sarah Palin A C and D student, who hates to govern, loves to campaign, and barely has a sixth grader's understanding of economics, will lead our nation into oblivion.

--James Moore
Michele Bachmann, who is from Iowa, and is Perry in Prada, has the same appeal among Teavangelicals. Her husband's reparative gay therapy sessions, the Newsweek cover and a few speeches that were not reality based will, eventually, make even the GOP primary voters realize she is bound for the desert and not the Promised Land.

Bachman will run close to Perry in Iowa but will disappear into the snows of New Hampshire where religious fervor isn't exactly considered a positive attribute. In South Carolina, Perry's money, image and support will become overwhelming.

Romney and Bachmann are the only serious impediments to the Perry nomination. Ron Paul, who makes more sense than any crazy person to ever run for public office, has never been able to expand his cult to the mainstream.

Herman Cain is too brutally honest and lacking political experience, and Tim Pawlenty, what's-his-face-from-Minnesota, suffers from the heartbreak of ineffectuality.

Fueled only by speculation that he might announce, Perry became the putative front-runner (heard that word at a fancy Washington restaurant and thought it was cool). Because presidential politics tend to be more visceral than intellectual, Perry's coyote-killer good looks, $2,000 hand-tooled cowboy boots, supernova smile and Armani suits, combined with podium skills to embellish the mythology of Texas, all will create a product Americans will want to believe and buy.

After he wins the nomination, protocol will require Perry to have discussions with Bachmann about the vice presidential slot, but he will, eventually, turn to Sarah Palin. The general election will force the Texan back toward the middle and he will stop talking about faith and abortion and gay marriage; Perry will campaign on jobs and the economy.

Palin, who is loved by the tea party as much as Perry, will keep the Teavangelicals animated while he tries to talk to the adults to win the election on a single issue: the economy, stupiderest!!! (Forget about Rudy Giuliani; the GOP cannot win New York, don't need it to take the election and Giuliani is wrong on gay marriage for this ticket).

Bennett: Make-or-break time for GOP field

The general election will, quite literally, decide the fate of a nation. Every time Team Obama criticizes the Texas economy for its minimum wage job boom, the president will be accused of attacking the working men and women of America. (Texas has created a large share of the new jobs in the United States in the last decade but studies indicate many of them are at places like Wal-Mart and Carl's Jr.)

President Obama will also get beaten up for presiding over the first bond rating downgrade in U.S. history as well as high unemployment. When the cold rains fall in early November next year, unemployed voters in places like Ohio will step into the booth and dream of a minimum wage job in the Texas sun selling fishing rods at big box sporting goods stores or working in call centers; they will vote against Barack Obama.

And in the process, they will write the epitaph to set upon the tombstone of history's greatest democracy: Perry-Palin, 2012.

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of James Moore.

0 Replies
 
Sturgis
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Aug, 2011 01:51 pm
@maxdancona,
All that make a run have a good shot at winning the Perrydency....I mean Presidency. A few years ago people were convince Hillary would win and that Obama didn't stand as much chance of survival as even a marshmallow in a campfire. When Smiley Carter showed up on the scene nobody thought he had a chance, and yet he won. Reagan wasn't expected to win, but he did.

People are given to voting for a candidate for any number of reasons, including, unfortunately, often voting for a person just to dispose of what is already in office...if President Obama doesn't get his act together, if he keeps blaming everybody else...when the hell is he planning to take some responsibility?...then he will be out before he can jog onto one more stage. Obama is the first President that I have truly grown to despise. I haven't liked other Presidents; but, I've never felt such antipathy towards one. Part of me wants to believe there is a genuine person hiding inside there; yet another part realizes he's just an egotistical attention hog with no real concern for the people and that is what will end up costing him the election, because people are brighter than he gives them credit for.
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Aug, 2011 02:03 pm
@Sturgis,
I don't think that Rick Perry has a very good shot against Obama. In fact Perry plays well to Obama's strengths. He let's Obama run against George Bush all over again (which worked pretty well last time 'round).

Not only that, Rick Perry is smarmy. He strikes many people as a snake oil salesman. And, his religious fanatic base sews up 30% of the vote, but these are people who will vote Republican anyway. The crazy religion thing turns away the middle.

Romney would be much more difficult for for Obama to beat in the general election.
Sturgis
 
  2  
Reply Sat 13 Aug, 2011 02:09 pm
@maxdancona,
Voters like smarmy.

At any rate, I never underestimate the voter. Just look around and see how many presumed winners....at federal, state and local levels have been soundly defeated on election day.
RABEL222
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Aug, 2011 06:12 pm
@Sturgis,
If he wins the Repub nomination it will force me to vote Dem.
0 Replies
 
Phoenix32890
 
  3  
Reply Thu 25 Aug, 2011 08:59 am
@edgarblythe,
I have to agree with you on that one. If Perry runs, I would vote for Obama, and for me, that is saying a lot.

Check this out:
http://www.npr.org/2011/08/24/139781021/the-evangelicals-engaged-in-spiritual-warfare

Click on "Listen to the story", and hear what Rachel Tabachnick has to say. It is enough to curl your hair!
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Aug, 2011 12:16 pm
I believe Perry acts not from true conviction, but self interest. Look at this random blog entry I just searched:

“Rick Perry, former Texas leader of Al Gore's re election campaign, will pander to any crowd that will support him. In this case, it is the hard-right­, "Christian­" conservati­ves -"
Phoenix32890
 
  2  
Reply Thu 25 Aug, 2011 01:08 pm
@edgarblythe,
Edgar- Did you get a chance to hear the NPR interview? I am not ready to go out and buy a tinfoil hat, but that discussion really frightened me.

Apparently, there is not too much difference between the Muslims wanting to institute Sharia law, and what the folks behind Perry want to do. The only difference is the cast of characters, and their own particular fantasy.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Aug, 2011 01:15 pm
@Phoenix32890,
Tangent, but related..

I'm rushing out the door so won't give a link, but there's a fully scary article about Michele Bachmann's beliefs in this last weeks New Yorker. Back later.
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Aug, 2011 01:21 pm
@ossobuco,
Oh yeah. I read it. WOW. Here 'tis:

http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2011/08/15/110815fa_fact_lizza
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Aug, 2011 01:52 pm
@Phoenix32890,
He has been my governor for years. You folks are just learning what I have known all along.
Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Aug, 2011 02:18 pm
@ossobuco,
Osso & Soz- Read the New Yorker article. I found the stuff on Perry far more disturbing, although Bachmann is in the running as far as wing nuts are concerned.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Aug, 2011 02:39 pm
Problem is, all the information is on the table for voters to see, and yet the polls have him far ahead of his rivals. One can only hope the voters don't read the polls.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

Obama '08? - Discussion by sozobe
Let's get rid of the Electoral College - Discussion by Robert Gentel
McCain's VP: - Discussion by Cycloptichorn
McCain is blowing his election chances. - Discussion by McGentrix
Food Stamp Turkeys - Discussion by H2O MAN
The 2008 Democrat Convention - Discussion by Lash
Snowdon is a dummy - Discussion by cicerone imposter
GAFFNEY: Whose side is Obama on? - Discussion by gungasnake
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Here are the issues that could beat Texas' Rick Perry
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 08/25/2019 at 09:16:01