19
   

"Step away from the candy and come with me, kid"

 
 
Irishk
 
  3  
Reply Sun 17 Jul, 2011 01:48 pm
@patiodog,
Well said. I think Joe attempted to head off hysteria with his inclusion of the word 'severe', but I have to admit to a knee-jerk reaction (OMG, is nothing sacred, and now they want to take away our chubby kids???) until I read the JAMA report.

I think it does a good job of addressing most concerns I've seen here and elsewhere. I also have to admit I come down on the side of the reporter laws -- not that there's any perfect solution, but at least the kids might not feel completely abandoned.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jul, 2011 01:53 pm
@Irishk,
Irishk wrote:
Well said. I think Joe attempted to head off hysteria with his inclusion of the word 'severe', but I have to admit to a knee-jerk reaction (OMG, is nothing sacred, and now they want to take away our chubby kids???) until I read the JAMA report.

I think it does a good job of addressing most concerns I've seen here and elsewhere. I also have to admit I come down on the side of the reporter laws -- not that there's any perfect solution, but at least the kids might not feel completely abandoned.
When I was a kid, no one tried to control my diet,
but if that had been attempted, I 'd have done whatever was necessary
to overthrow the interference.





David
manored
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jul, 2011 01:54 pm
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:

Over population and thus mass famine will solve this problem soon enough, it is nothing to get excited about.
Eh, probaly, but im hoping we dont end up actually letting our already excessive population grow even more and burst the critical point.

wayne wrote:

I have a friend whose grandchildren are Brits, when they visited a couple summers ago guess what they wanted to do ; they wanted to go to Mcdonalds and watch the fat people.
=)

That is actually kinda sad.

hawkeye10
 
  2  
Reply Sun 17 Jul, 2011 01:54 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
Quote:
In the 17OOs and the 18OOs, both sides of the issue were debated with passion.
Slavery is an issue where we clearly see that the winners write the history, just look at how the South is now depicted in the Civil War, now most often they are considered the bigots who forced a disastrous war as the Union had to come down and teach them that they could not have slaves. Slavery was a long running debate that did not lead to consensus where passions ran high, and the civil war was about more than slavery, what we have taught now is not history but is morality indoctrination packaged as history.
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jul, 2011 02:00 pm
@manored,
manored wrote:



wayne wrote:

I have a friend whose grandchildren are Brits, when they visited a couple summers ago guess what they wanted to do ; they wanted to go to Mcdonalds and watch the fat people.


That is actually kinda sad.




What part?..... that these kids are so stupid that they dont know that they are surrounded by fat people at home?
Quote:
n 1980, 8% of women and 6% of men in England were obese - by 1998, that had almost trebled to 21% of women and 17% of men.

A further 32% of women and 46% of men are overweight, meaning that most people in England (58%) are now either fat or obese.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/1170787.stm

2006

Quote:
Adult obesity rates have almost quadrupled in the last 25 years, with 22% of Britons now obese and three-quarters are overweight.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/4667826.stm
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jul, 2011 02:01 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
Mine either, David, but we were probably fortunate in more ways than we can count. That's not true for all kids, unfortunately.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jul, 2011 02:03 pm
@Irishk,
Irishk wrote:
Mine either, David, but we were probably fortunate in more ways than we can count.
That's not true for all kids, unfortunately.
I wish that thay were all libertarian Individualists.





David
0 Replies
 
manored
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jul, 2011 04:35 pm
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:

What part?..... that these kids are so stupid that they dont know that they are surrounded by fat people at home?
The fact that fat populations are being seen as tourist attractions =)

But I suppose that is sad too.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jul, 2011 04:44 pm
@Irishk,
I agree with Pdog's well elaborated point. I agree with yours too, re report laws, at the same time I see them adding this as starting up a new kind of riot act based on misunderstood misinformation misplaced.

There is such a thing as child abuse, and some levels of non care arrive at that.
ossobuco
 
  3  
Reply Sun 17 Jul, 2011 05:07 pm
@manored,
I remember arriving at Los Angeles Airport after my first trip to europe from the u.s. in 1988. I was 46, late in getting to make such a trip. I remember blinking at the large numbers of chubby people in the then waiting area at LAX. I had been away a month to a country where there were some differences from us, and so was startled.

First of all, blaming is not my interest. I can see and agree with genetic and physiologic and metabolic reasons for obesity, some starting from birth with the number of fat cells and biochemistry already going strong. I understand the usual easy does it 'calories in exercise out' mode does not always work. I can see 'fat baby is healthy' cultural stuff. I can see the change in children's play, from when I was a kid, that happened for several reasons including fear of predators (media promoted or not), and women as a group getting jobs even, gasp, while being mothers. I was taught a woman could only be a doctor if she was single, and the mcat books in '62 reflected that as well sheer dominance bias. Things started to change just after that.) TV got ever more interesting and then came video games. TV as baby sitter. Families moving, so no easy care with relatives. I can see food companies supplying the wants of the multitudes, salty grease and sugar in revolving desires. I can strongly see need for inexpensive food.

This is all a culture, and we in the u.s. and some other places have been spreading it. Meantime we have another mode, making fun of France (etc), which we could learn from, or could have.
Setanta
 
  0  
Reply Sun 17 Jul, 2011 07:55 pm
@hawkeye10,
You're just as clueless as David, and you're just as surely making **** up to suit your ideological cant. The South started that war, with malice aforethought, they got their military ass handed to them, and they've been whining about it ever since.

In fact, the dominant theme of propaganda about the American civil war has been framed by southerners, with particular reference to the "lost cause" myth. Most Americans buy that bullshit line that the North started the war, and specifically that Mr. Lincoln did so. This despite Secretary Floyd illegally shipping arms to southern states throughout 1860, before Mr. Lincoln was even elected. This despite the fact that "state troops" of Florida and Alabama began seizing Federal property two months before Mr. Lincoln was inaugurated. This despite "state troops" of South Carolina firing on an unarmed merchant ship in Charleston harbor on January 9th, 1861, almost two months before Mr. Lincoln took office. The popular American myth of the civil war is one of history's greatest examples of the triumph of the "big lie."

You and Dave should be going steady--you share many of the same delusions, and certainly the same crippling ignorance of American history.
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jul, 2011 07:57 pm
@Setanta,
whew...

I thought ehbeth's head had popped off for a moment...
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jul, 2011 08:11 pm
@Rockhead,
I could 'splain it . . . but i suspect you know . . .
0 Replies
 
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jul, 2011 08:53 pm
@ossobuco,
osso wrote:
I agree with yours too, re report laws, at the same time I see them adding this as starting up a new kind of riot act based on misunderstood misinformation misplaced.


This ties in with hawkeye's point that doing it would be bad PR, I think -- mebbe coming from disparate voices means it might be useful.

Quote:
TV got ever more interesting and then came video games. TV as baby sitter. Families moving, so no easy care with relatives. I can see food companies supplying the wants of the multitudes, salty grease and sugar in revolving desires. I can strongly see need for inexpensive food.


That paragraph about sums it up, I think.


Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jul, 2011 09:14 pm
@patiodog,
We (my siblings and I) started learning about good nutrition early in school -- somewhere around 3rd grade, I think. Then again in middle school and yet again in high school. I can remember coming home when I was around 13 or so and driving my mom crazy by going into the pantry and reading aloud all the ingredients on the cans and boxes and taunting her that we were all gonna die!!!
Twisted Evil
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jul, 2011 09:31 pm
@Irishk,
We learned no such thing. We got our processed foods and we liked it.

Home was very spare for me, though. We kept a couple of things in the fridge, and we ate them. Most of the families I knew were the same wayt. There was no "What do I want for dinner?" and having at hand 10 different options in the freezer. I find myself resorting to the same habit now that I'm living on my own -- asking, "What do I want to eat for the next week?" and I've been a lot healthier without making much of an effort.

Those hippie parents may have messed some things up, but having to bake bread to eat bread makes you think a lot harder about whether you need that bread to begin with...
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jul, 2011 09:39 pm
@patiodog,
Well, when I went into the pantry, I was looking for Hamburger Helper. They really hammered that one -- reading and explaining the ingredients and how bad they were. I was disappointed I didn't find any at home, but I found plenty of other stuff to annoy mom with. She was probably beyond glad when that class was over and done with for the year.

We were taught the evils of bacon lol. I remember that so well and didn't eat it for a long time.
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jul, 2011 09:48 pm
@Irishk,
That's funny. We always had some bacon, and we saved the grease to cook with instead of storebought oil. Had garden tomatoes, too, but they don't grow here as easy as they do out there.
0 Replies
 
manored
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jul, 2011 10:00 pm
@Irishk,
Irishk wrote:

We (my siblings and I) started learning about good nutrition early in school -- somewhere around 3rd grade, I think. Then again in middle school and yet again in high school. I can remember coming home when I was around 13 or so and driving my mom crazy by going into the pantry and reading aloud all the ingredients on the cans and boxes and taunting her that we were all gonna die!!!
Twisted Evil
You arent dead... =)
0 Replies
 
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jul, 2011 10:04 pm
@Irishk,
0 Replies
 
 

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