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"Step away from the candy and come with me, kid"

 
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2011 12:09 pm
@Linkat,
One of the articles I read discussed a 3 year old girl who weighed 90 pounds. They're talking about obese children, not overweight children. (The "average 3 year old girl weighs 30.8 pounds. A girl isn't expected to weigh 90 pounds until she's 11-12 years old.)
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2011 12:11 pm
@boomerang,
You mean morbidly obese. Not sure how much this girl weighs at 10, but she is obese - not sure if she classifies as morbidly obese.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2011 12:16 pm
@sozobe,
I'm reading a really interesting book right now called "Why Beautiful People Have More Daughters" about evolutionary psychology (the evolution of the brain).

It talks a lot about our "stone age brain" (where liking fats and sweets most likely kept you alive and allowed you to reproduce) living in modern times (where we don't need fats and sweets to stay alive and reproduce). Interesting stuff.

Mo's kind of a chunky little guy and we eat a healthy diet that doesn't include fast food or processed food and very little junk food. He plays lots of sports and is otherwise active. He's just a chunky kid. A healthy chunky kid.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2011 12:19 pm
@Linkat,
Linkat wrote:
By the same authority that plans on taking the obese kids away from their parents.
I imagine that I 'd be very irate
if I had any kids and that happened.

Over and over again, I feel so good about having no children.
I remain immune to a lot. It makes me very, very happy; thrilled.





David
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2011 12:24 pm
@boomerang,
boomerang wrote:
I'm reading a really interesting book right now called "Why Beautiful People Have More Daughters" about evolutionary psychology (the evolution of the brain).

It talks a lot about our "stone age brain" (where liking fats and sweets most likely kept you alive and allowed you to reproduce) living in modern times (where we don't need fats and sweets to stay alive and reproduce). Interesting stuff.

Mo's kind of a chunky little guy and we eat a healthy diet that doesn't include fast food or processed food and very little junk food. He plays lots of sports and is otherwise active. He's just a chunky kid. A healthy chunky kid.
I thawt he looked OK,
in terms of being reasonably slender, boom; not bad at all.





David
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2011 12:32 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
That's because under his soft outer layer he is solid muscle. He is seriously strong. He can pick me up and carry me around and I weigh quite a bit more than he does. I don't know many kids who can lift their own weight plus some.
Linkat
 
  2  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2011 12:47 pm
@boomerang,
My older girl loves to pick me up. She can't carry me too far, but she can pick me up. She is almost as tall as me, but significantly less than me. She is strong as an ox. Amazing such a skinny twig of a girl - we were playing pushing against each others hands trying to move the other - I couldn't believe how strong she was.

Either that or I am a weakling.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2011 12:51 pm
@sozobe,
As you know, he's my favorite med writer.. including about changes that we can make to health care provision.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2011 12:55 pm
@ossobuco,
ossobuco wrote:
As you know, he's my favorite med writer.. including about changes that we can make to health care provision.
Any sign of the book yet, Osso?
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2011 01:02 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
Hi, David. No.. but I haven't walked to the mailbox today (soon). I'll let you know if and when it shows up. I would anyway, but I've been starting to wonder. On the other hand, media mailing can take quite a few days, and on the other hand again, our mail service here is a little wacky compared to other places I've lived.
0 Replies
 
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2011 01:03 pm
@joefromchicago,
joefromchicago wrote:
Severe obesity in children -- is that a form of child abuse? Should the state step in and save these kids from their parents?


I think so. I don't think it's any different from neglectful parents putting their children at risk by having loaded guns lying around the house. Of course, anorexic children are also at risk and would need intervention, too.

There was a case a few years ago where a 14 year old boy ballooned up to 555 pounds and they arrested the mother, I think because she wasn't willing to cooperate with authorities trying to get help for her son.

Could be a slippery slope, but I think the JAMA report makes it clear that it would only apply to 'severe' cases....and cases where it was clear there wasn't an 'underlying genetic condition'...just parental neglect.
manored
 
  2  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2011 01:13 pm
@tsarstepan,
tsarstepan wrote:

David... you're so not looking at the big picture. If this current trend continues, a whole generation or two will be lost. Considering that we are globally competing against India and China who so far DON'T suffer this epidemic, we will fall farther behind in almost every aspect.
Why the competitive mindset? I though the purpose of governments was to achieve the happiness and wellfare of their population, not to beat others at global control.

boomerang wrote:

I don't think it's that easy.

My niece is a nutritionist at a very fancy private hospital. She meets with every single patient and, after reviewing all of their medical records, gives them a comprehensive diet plan. These are people whose LIVES often depend on them making changes and they still don't change.

Food is a complicated subject.
Indeed. There is a near-infinite number of variables to consider, many of which are not quite known. Different people deal with different kinds of food in different ways, both psychologically and physically.

I think instead of changing their diets, people should just start doing more exercises. Its just as hard to get people to do it, but at least its simpler =)

Off course, doesnt quite work if the person's feeding habits are too horrible.

sozobe wrote:

Yeah, definitely.

And there's more and more stuff coming out about the biological baseline differences -- as in, person A might have a physical makeup that makes it much easier to gain weight than person B, even if their environment is exactly the same. (What they eat, how much of it, how much exercise they get, etc.)

Still love Atul Gawande's line, "We are a species that has evolved to survive starvation, not to resist abundance."
Haha, thats true =)

I think that the problem of abundance can be linked back to the problem of starvation... our food doesnt flow right, we have people dying of hunger in some places and people dying of excessive eating in others.

Because we have people dying of hunger, we cant aford to cull the food production: it would make said starvers even more starving. But if we dont cull the food production, the more afortunate literally suffocate is the excess of food made avaible to them... its a ridiculous tragedy =)

Fundamentally the problem is one of economic disparity. The economic disparity in the world encourages the production of excessive food. If the global distribuition of wealth was more balanced we wouldnt need to produce as much excess, consequently food would be more expensive and people would over-eat less.

Off course, im kinda assuming that humans are stupid like dogs and turtles and will eat to death if that possibility is open, but I dont think im too far off =)



I think it doesnt make sense to try to apply legal action, such as taking children way from their parents, to a problem that is so widespread through the populace. I mean, if nearly the entire population of a city takes part in an ilegal and disrupting protest, the police isnt going to arrest everyone. If they are just a few wackos, they will.
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2011 01:15 pm
@Irishk,
I could understand that - if the child were severely obese and the parent refuses to do anything about helping the child especially after being directed to by proper authorities. I'd imagine that is similar to any sort of medical issue.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2011 01:19 pm
@manored,
<agreeing>
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2011 01:25 pm
@Irishk,
joefromchicago wrote:
Severe obesity in children -- is that a form of child abuse? Should the state step in and save these kids from their parents?
Irishk wrote:
I think so. I don't think it's any different from neglectful parents putting their children at risk
by having loaded guns lying around the house.
Thay shoud be trained in competent handling of defensive guns;
( assuming that there is nothing mentally defective in them.)
One never knows if or when his use thereof
might become necessary in a predatory emergency.





David
parados
 
  2  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2011 01:35 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
Maybe people on A2K need to be armed and trained in defensive guns.
One never knows if or when the use therof
might become necessary in a predatory thread derailment.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2011 01:49 pm
@parados,
parados wrote:
Maybe people on A2K need to be armed and trained in defensive guns.
Yea; the sooner, the better.




parados wrote:
One never knows if or when the use therof
might become necessary in a predatory thread derailment.
One does not; nor 2, either.
0 Replies
 
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2011 01:54 pm
@manored,
manored wrote:
I think it doesnt make sense to try to apply legal action, such as taking children way from their parents, to a problem that is so widespread through the populace. I mean, if nearly the entire population of a city takes part in an ilegal and disrupting protest, the police isnt going to arrest everyone. If they are just a few wackos, they will.


I think the report cited by Joe dealt more with instances of children who are possibly at a stage of critical health risk as deemed by social services/physicians/authorities.
manored
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2011 03:31 pm
@Irishk,
Irishk wrote:

I think the report cited by Joe dealt more with instances of children who are possibly at a stage of critical health risk as deemed by social services/physicians/authorities.
Hum, picking out exceptional cases caused by parental neglect may make sense... albeit, since there are a lot of other children in similar situations, there will probaly be a huge fuss over what does and does not constitute neglect and things like that.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2011 03:36 pm
@Irishk,
I agree with both of you, but I am for having something in place for clear abuse/risk.
0 Replies
 
 

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