6
   

thylke day =?

 
 
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2011 06:51 am
Wodensday =?

Context:

A POSTHUMOUS WRITING OF DIEDRICH KNICKERBOCKER



By Woden, God of Saxons,
From whence comes Wensday, that is Wodensday,
Truth is a thing that ever I will keep
Unto thylke day in which I creep into
My sepulchre.
~ CARTWRIGHT


The following Tale was found among the papers of the late Diedrich Knickerbocker, an old gentleman of New York, who was very curious in the Dutch history of the province, and the manners of the descendants from its primitive settlers. His historical researches, however, did not lie so much among books as among men; for the former are lamentably scanty on his favorite topics; whereas he found the old burghers, and still more their wives, rich in that legendary lore, so invaluable to true history. Whenever, therefore, he happened upon a genuine Dutch family, snugly shut up in its low-roofed farmhouse, under a spreading sycamore, he looked upon it as a little clasped volume of black-letter, and studied it with the zeal of a book-worm.
More:

http://www.online-literature.com/irving/2053/
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Type: Question • Score: 6 • Views: 4,894 • Replies: 12
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View best answer, chosen by oristarA
contrex
  Selected Answer
 
  2  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2011 07:13 am
@oristarA,
Wodensday: old name which has become Wednesday. Woden is an Anglo-Saxon god.

Thylke: Saxon word meaning "that same".

oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2011 08:29 am
@contrex,
contrex wrote:

Wodensday: old name which has become Wednesday. Woden is an Anglo-Saxon god.

Thylke: Saxon word meaning "that same".




Thank you.

Where have you found these?
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2011 12:50 pm
@oristarA,
oristarA wrote:
Where have you found these?


Thylke:

http://www.google.com/search?source=ig&hl=en&rlz=&q=thylke&aq=f&aqi=g1g-v2&aql=&oq=

Wodensday:

I didn't need to "find" this one. Every English speaking schoolchild is taught the origins of the names of the days of the week, or at least they were when I was one.

However...

http://www.google.com/search?source=ig&hl=en&rlz=&q=wodensday&aq=0&aqi=g1g-s1g-sx7g-sv1&aql=&oq=wodensda

McTag
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2011 04:06 pm
@oristarA,

Ori, you read some weird stuff.

But that's okay.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2011 06:51 pm
@McTag,
Quote:
Every English speaking schoolchild is taught the origins of the names of the days of the week, or at least they were when I was one.


Were you also taught this, McTag?
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2011 07:52 pm
@contrex,
Thank you.
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  2  
Reply Sun 19 Jun, 2011 01:17 am
@JTT,

Of course. Named after Norse and Roman gods, mainly.
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Jun, 2011 02:19 am
@McTag,
McTag wrote:


Of course. Named after Norse and Roman gods, mainly.


The English day names refer to heavenly bodies - the Sun, the Moon and 5 of the planets. To the Greeks each one had a god associated with it. From Greece the planetary week names passed to the Romans, who substituted their own names for these gods and from Latin to other languages of southern and western Europe, and to other languages later influenced by them. The Germanic peoples adapted the system introduced by the Romans but glossed their indigenous gods over the Roman deities (with the exception of Saturday). The English names derive from the Germanic ones.

There is an excellent Wikipedia page about this, with some good further references

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Week-day_names



joanalden08
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 Dec, 2013 12:53 pm
@oristarA,
thylke day....where did you find that? lke ??? from Dutch I think...the same ilk I could not find it in the OED which really surprised me.
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 Dec, 2013 01:45 pm
@joanalden08,
joanalden08 wrote:
thylke day....where did you find that?

You are attempting to revive a thread which has been dead for over 2 years.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 Dec, 2013 02:01 pm
@contrex,
contrex wrote:
The English day names refer to heavenly bodies - the Sun, the Moon and 5 of the planets.


Yes, well, as long as it has been resurrected, it is worth noting that this is bullsh*t. Tuesday derives from Tiw's day, a reference to the Norse pantheon. Wednesday refers to Woden. Thursday refers to Thor. Friday refers to Frigg. The Romans named days of the week after the members of their pantheon--Saturday, for example, is a survival of that. The Anglo-Saxons simply substituted the names of the gods of their pantheon for the Roman names that had been in use by the Britons. Planets ain't got nothin' to do with it.
0 Replies
 
AlexanderH
 
  0  
Reply Wed 3 Nov, 2021 07:35 pm
Can we translate thylke as 'this same' alongside 'that same' too? My turn at revival.
0 Replies
 
 

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