6
   

Did Neville Chamberlain cause WW2?

 
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Sat 18 Jun, 2011 01:56 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
Quote:
The available choices were to energeticly enforce it,
or to neglect it, as thay DID, permitting the 3rd Reich to re-arm for vengeance.


Sorry you could not enforce it on a country with double the population of France at the time for any prolong period of time, all you could do is to increase the hates and made the payback even worst when it came.

It would be as if the Confederate States had won the US civil war with the aid of the direct involvements of the Europeans powers and had placed the same harsh peace terms on the North as was placed on Germany creating a generation who only dream is of revenge against the South.

No matter how hard the Southern states try to enforce the terms and keep the far more powerful North disarm sooner or later they would find ways to rearm and march South looking for revenge.

France knew they had a tiger by the tail that is why they pour so must resources into building the Maginot line.

0 Replies
 
33export
 
  2  
Reply Sat 18 Jun, 2011 02:22 pm
@BDV,
I believe Gavrilo Princip should share some of the blame
for WWII. He lit the fuse to the dynamite setting off WWI. Link takes you to the particulars at Wikipedia.

OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 18 Jun, 2011 03:52 pm
@33export,
33export wrote:
I believe Gavrilo Princip should share some of the blame
for WWII. He lit the fuse to the dynamite setting off WWI. Link takes you to the particulars at Wikipedia.
SO STIPULATED.

The 2nd World War was a continuation of the First World War.





David
BDV
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Jun, 2011 06:18 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
I have to agree with that, the first world war did not have a military defeat of anybody, much like gulf war 1 and 2, the thought of german people was "they never lost so why do we suffer"
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Jun, 2011 03:54 am
The Germans were defeated in the field in the first world war. It was their intransigence, their unwillingness to acknowledge that defeat which helped to fuel the rise of an unreasoning militarism and nationalism. Ludendorf and Hindenberg asked for an armistice in November, 1918 to prevent the invasion of Germany. That can only mean that they had been defeated in the field. The Rhineland was then occupied by the American army. It's a bit thick to claim you were not defeated in the field when you have asked for and submitted to terms and a foreign army is occupying your territory.

Quote:
On 29 September 1918 the German Supreme Command informed Kaiser Wilhelm II and the Imperial Chancellor Count Georg von Hertling at army headquarters in Spa, Belgium that the military situation was hopeless. Generalquartiermeister Erich Ludendorff, probably fearing a breakthrough, claimed that he could not guarantee that the front would hold for another 24 hours and demanded a request be given to the Entente for an immediate ceasefire. In addition, he recommended the acceptance of the main demand of US President Woodrow Wilson (Fourteen Points) and put the Imperial Government on a democratic footing, hoping for more favourable peace terms. This enabled him to save the face of the Imperial Army and put the responsibility for the capitulation and its consequences squarely into the hands of the democratic parties and the parliament. As he said to officers of his staff on 1 October: "They now must lie on the bed that they've made us." Thus was born the "Stab-in-the-back" notion that the army had not failed, only the civilians.


Source at Wikipedia

Quote:
American soldiers remained in Europe for some time as the demobilization continued, guarding against renewed hostilities. A newly activated Third Army crossed the French border into Germany on December 1, 1918, to occupy the region around Koblenz, between Luxembourg and the Rhine River. Eight U.S. divisions organized into three corps participated in the occupation of Germany. American occupation forces encountered no unusual difficulties with the populace, and their numbers were rapidly reduced after the Paris Peace Conference ended in May 1919. They numbered only about 15,000 by the beginning of 1920. After rejecting the Treaty of Versailles that resulted from the peace conference, the United States technically remained at war with Germany until a separate peace was signed in the summer of 1921. Occupying forces gradually withdrew after that, until the last thousand troops departed on January 24, 1923.


Source at the United States Army in Europe
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Jun, 2011 04:04 am
@BDV,
Setanta's post is accurate n correct.





David
0 Replies
 
BDV
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Jun, 2011 02:58 pm
@Setanta,
I agree what i meant to say was that they had not been beaten psychological, i think at the time europe needed total war to solve its many problems, followed by total defeat (which WW2 provided), but in saying that I also believe WW1 had come to its natural conclusion, the will to fight had ceased on both sides well before 1918.
0 Replies
 
 

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