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BIN LADEN is DEAD!!!!

 
 
Reply Sun 1 May, 2011 09:55 pm
Praise the Lord justice was dispersed, under Obama's jurisdiction. Very Happy
 
View best answer, chosen by JGoldman10
JGoldman10
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 1 May, 2011 10:05 pm
It was inevitable.
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  0  
Reply Mon 2 May, 2011 12:55 am
No one else is THRILLED Bin Laden was brought to justice?
izzythepush
 
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Reply Mon 2 May, 2011 02:11 am
@JGoldman10,
I don't think thrilled is the right word. A better way to feel would be wary. Al Qaida is not a top down organisation, it's more of a symbol. Bin Laden will now be viewed as a martyr, and now the most tricky period of all begins. Let's just hope his death does not inspire a rush of revenge attacks.

Al Qaida, and those inspired by BinLaden will not go away until the rights of the ordinary Moslems around the world are respected. After 9/11 Bush made a fatal mistake by using the word crusade. This is a word that convinces Moslems that America isn't against terrorism and dictatorships it's against Moslems. Convincing the Moslem world that America is not involved in a crusade is one of the greatest challenges America faces today.

Still, Obama has played a blinder. Bin Laden's had this coming for a long time, be happy and celebrate, but don't let your guard down.
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 May, 2011 02:53 am
@izzythepush,
You are right- the word I am looking for is ENTHRALLED. Very Happy
H2O MAN
 
  0  
Reply Mon 2 May, 2011 05:14 am
@JGoldman10,


President George W. Bush Congratulates Obama on Bin Laden Killing

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H2O MAN
 
  0  
Reply Mon 2 May, 2011 05:22 am
http://www.foxnews.com/images/root_images/050211_BINLADEN_20110502_062906.jpg
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H2O MAN
 
  -3  
Reply Mon 2 May, 2011 05:23 am
http://i769.photobucket.com/albums/xx340/Infidelzfun/Obama-darn-1.gif
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Mon 2 May, 2011 05:44 am
@H2O MAN,
Osama told his wife just before the hit.
"Im not going to take a shower, Ill just wash up on the beach"

Is Trump demanding to see Ossama's Death Certificate?


How many trillions could we have saved by just doing this in the firast place? Im sure he was easier to find in the early days
blueveinedthrobber
 
  3  
Reply Mon 2 May, 2011 05:59 am
Donald Trump is proud today that he finally convinced Obama to kill Bin Laden.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 May, 2011 06:02 am
@blueveinedthrobber,
I hope that there are a heap of great Osama jokes. EVeryone is taking this like 9/11 was a trifle?

Its times like this that Id wish that there really were a hell and this guy would be on the fast track to the deepest level reserved for evil popes.
H2O MAN
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 May, 2011 06:15 am
@farmerman,
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eQ47eGSilPc&feature=player_embedded
mysteryman
 
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Reply Mon 2 May, 2011 06:16 am
Apparently, it was a CIA led operation, carried out by a Navy Seal Team (when you care enough to send the very best).

0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 May, 2011 06:19 am
@H2O MAN,
Today we put aside all political differences and join hands together for a job well done, and later we will meet at the dock to piss all over Osamas grave!.
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revelette
 
  0  
Reply Mon 2 May, 2011 06:21 am
Bin Laden raid years in the making, minutes in execution

Interesting that the compound was not in the caves and the hills, but inside a suburban city close to Islamabad.
H2O MAN
 
  0  
Reply Mon 2 May, 2011 06:22 am
The tip that landed Usama bin Laden came to light in August. It was a “great lead,” a federal law enforcement source told Fox News.

Officials wouldn’t know how good it was until months later. After an exhaustive streak of intelligence gathering and high-level meetings, that tip resulted Sunday in the death of the world’s most wanted terrorist at U.S. hands.

Though President Obama gave only sparse details of the operation in his surprise address to the nation Sunday night, officials filled in the blanks where they could about the mission that brought to justice the man responsible for the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks and countless acts of violence around the world.

Though bin Laden was pursued throughout the George W. Bush administration, President Obama renewed the effort on June 2, 2009, when he signed a memo to CIA Director Leon Panetta ordering a “detailed operation plan” for finding and capturing bin Laden.

More than a year later, what Obama described as a “possible lead” came in. Senior administration officials said they had been tracking an Al Qaeda courier in bin Laden’s inner circle. Two years ago, the U.S. determined the areas in Pakistan where he operated. By August, they had determined the exact location in Abbottabad, Pakistan -- where bin Laden was apparently hiding out in a sprawling compound on the outskirts of town.

One U.S. official said the compound was built over a six-year period. The intelligence community, led by the CIA, concluded it was custom-built to house someone of bin Laden’s stature. It was enclosed by a high wall topped with barbed wire, and protected by two security gates.

Officials said that by February, they determined they would pursue the compound. This touched off a series of high-level meetings to develop a course of action.

According to one senior administration official, the president convened at least nine meetings with his top national security leaders. Those advisers met formally another five times, in addition to countless briefings among the National Security Council, CIA, Pentagon and Joint Chiefs of Staff. The president was actively involved at all levels, the official said.

The federal law enforcement source said that by last week, it seemed “this might be the real deal.”

The president must have felt the same way. At 8:20 a.m. on April 29, before he left for Alabama to survey storm damage, Obama authorized the operation to target bin Laden.

By Sunday, a “small team” of special operations forces was in Pakistan for the final mission. That mission was the all-day focus of national security staff.

According to one official, national security leaders were in the Situation Room since 1 p.m. Sunday. The rest of the afternoon went as follows:

At 2 p.m., Obama met with the team to review final preparations.

At 3:32 p.m., he returned to the Situation Room for an additional briefing.

At 3:50 p.m., he learned that bin Laden had been tentatively identified.

At 7:01 p.m., the president learned there was a “high probability” the target was bin Laden.

At 8:30 p.m., Obama received more briefings.

In Abbottabad, a senior U.S. defense official said the actual operation took place at 3:30 p.m. ET.

Officials said three adult men other than bin Laden were killed – one was believed to be bin Laden’s son, the others couriers. One woman was killed when she was used as a human shield and two other women were also injured, the officials said.

No Americans were killed, though the U.S. did lose a helicopter that went down due to mechanical failure. An official said the Pakistanis were not involved in the raid but helped provide information that led to it. Intelligence was also provided by detainees.



djjd62
 
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Reply Mon 2 May, 2011 06:26 am
@H2O MAN,
on their way out of afghanistan, perhaps the US could do everyone a favour and level pakistan, they sure turned out to be great allies in the war on terror Rolling Eyes
H2O MAN
 
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Reply Mon 2 May, 2011 06:29 am
@djjd62,
djjd62 wrote:

on their way out of afghanistan, perhaps the US could do everyone a favour and level pakistan, they sure turned out to be great allies in the war on terror Rolling Eyes


Obama said he would do something like that if he was elected.
08/03/2007

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (AP) — Pakistan on Friday criticized U.S. presidential hopeful Barack Obama for saying that, if elected, he might order unilateral military strikes inside this Islamic nation to root out terrorists.
0 Replies
 
H2O MAN
 
  2  
Reply Mon 2 May, 2011 07:14 am
✓ Saddam Hussein
✓ Osama Bin Laden
☐ Justin Bieber
revelette
 
  0  
Reply Mon 2 May, 2011 08:10 am
@H2O MAN,
Quote:
The killing of Osama bin Laden will deal a big psychological blow to al-Qaida but may have little practical impact on an increasingly decentralized group that has operated tactically without him for years.

Nearly a decade after the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks, al-Qaida has fragmented into a globally scattered network of autonomous groups in which bin Laden served as an inspirational figure from the core group's traditional Pakistan-Afghanistan base.

Counter-terrorism specialists describe a constantly mutating movement that is harder to hunt than in its turn-of-the-century heyday because it is increasingly diffuse — a multi-ethnic, regionally dispersed and online-influenced hybrid of activists.

While this network remains a threat, the core al-Qaida leadership has been weakened by years of U.S. drone strikes in Pakistan. It has not staged a successful attack in the West since London bombings that killed 52 people in 2005.

Al-Qaida has also been hurt ideologically by uprisings in the Arab world by ordinary people seeking democracy and human rights — notions anathema to bin Laden, who once said democracy was akin to idolatry as it placed man's desires above God's.

The arm of al-Qaida that now poses the biggest threat to the United States is its affiliate in Yemen, al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), according to U.S. officials. Other al-Qaida-linked groups have grown in ambition and lethality.

As a matter of leadership of terrorist operations, bin Laden has really not been the main story for some time," said Paul Pillar, a former senior U.S. intelligence official.

The instigation of most operations has been at the periphery not the center — and by periphery I'm including groups like AQAP but also smaller entities as well."

It was AQAP that claimed responsibility for a thwarted Christmas Day attack aboard a U.S. airliner in 2009 and an attempt last year to blow up two U.S.-bound cargo planes with toner cartridges packed with explosives.

The head of the U.S. National Counterterrorism Center, Michael Leiter, acknowledged to Congress earlier this year that AQAP and its chief English-language preacher Anwar al-Awlaki posed the biggest risk to the United States.

Al-Awlaki, a U.S. citizen who left the country in 2001 and joined al-Qaida in Yemen, also communicated with a U.S. Army major who in November 2009 allegedly went on a shooting rampage at Fort Hood, Texas that killed 13 and wounded 32.

The Pakistani Taliban claimed responsibility for a failed bombing in New York City's Times Square a year ago.

Psychological, political impact
"I don't think there's any real military significance (to bin Laden's death)," said Arturo Munoz, a security analyst at RAND Corporation.

"The significance is political and psychological and psychologically and politically, there's a huge significance."

"Bin Laden's death is a significant victory for the United States. But it is more symbolic than concrete," said Fawaz Gerges, an al-Qaida expert at the London School of Economics.


More at the source
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