12
   

I'm Voting Green This Friday

 
 
H2O MAN
 
  -3  
Reply Thu 21 Apr, 2011 05:01 am


I like Canada and I hope you don't make the mistake our country made.
Don't ruin your country by electing a guy like Barry.
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Thu 21 Apr, 2011 05:14 am
Jack Layton has Québec in his hip pocket now, look for a Liberal-NDP coalition.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Apr, 2011 05:14 am
SOCIALISM RULES ! ! !
OmSigDAVID
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 21 Apr, 2011 05:29 am
@Setanta,
Sad, if true.

At least its not here.
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Apr, 2011 05:50 am
@Setanta,
well sure, he's got the screws in his hip*, he might as well have the screwballs in his hip pocket


maybe he could get a favour from one group in Quebec that has ties with another group that pours a lot of cement, get Iggy a nice box in the foundation of the Nordiques new arena


0 Replies
 
Tai Chi
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Apr, 2011 06:23 am
@H2O MAN,
Barry?
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_tBqi5ja-dgs/S9bsbkM4vDI/AAAAAAAAC-g/fWbL-q8W5jI/s320/Goldwater2.jpg
OmSigDAVID
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 21 Apr, 2011 06:31 am
@Tai Chi,
Tai Chi wrote:

Barry?
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_tBqi5ja-dgs/S9bsbkM4vDI/AAAAAAAAC-g/fWbL-q8W5jI/s320/Goldwater2.jpg

Oswald assassinated him.
Tai Chi
 
  4  
Reply Thu 21 Apr, 2011 06:35 am
@OmSigDAVID,
I know you're just teasing me, David. Everybody knows he was abducted by aliens.
0 Replies
 
H2O MAN
 
  -4  
Reply Thu 21 Apr, 2011 06:48 am
@Tai Chi,
http://images.dailykos.com/images/user/3/Barry_Obama_lg.jpg
Tai Chi
 
  3  
Reply Thu 21 Apr, 2011 07:35 am
@H2O MAN,
(Okay, I confess. I was poking you with a sharp stick, H2O Man.)

I can understand over-the-top irrational feelings toward political figures. The mention of a former Ontario premier brings on the gag reflex for me -- and I really mean that! Your President Obama doesn't cause me to react that way -- but of course you are allowed your opinion.
H2O MAN
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Apr, 2011 07:51 am
@Tai Chi,
Tai Chi wrote:



I can understand over-the-top irrational feelings toward political figures.


I've seen it (Liberals and their feelings for Palin), but I don't understand it.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Apr, 2011 05:34 pm
@djjd62,
http://www.projectdemocracy.ca/

Quote:
Project Democracy is a tool to help you determine if there is a way to "amp up" your vote and stop a Harper majority. By using a riding by riding election prediction model based on the most up to date public opinion polls, we can tell you which Party is best positioned to defeat the Conservative in your riding. Just enter your postal code in the box to the right.


I got this link in an email from Bob Bossin. It's also posted at votepair
Tai Chi
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Apr, 2011 09:36 am
@ehBeth,
Thanks for the link, ehBeth. Unfortunately our Conservative incumbent is so far out in front they won't even make a suggestion. "Vote your conscience -- it won't matter." <sigh>
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Apr, 2011 11:22 am
@Tai Chi,
same here right now

oh, and won't be voting this weekend, alternator on the car packed it in this morning, car sitting at dealership waiting for them to re-open

hmmm, wonder which candidate will give me a ride Confused
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Apr, 2011 11:24 am
@djjd62,
hamburgboy and I are both in ridings where it could make a difference

I know he won't vote Conservative but I'm not sure the site or I can convince him to vote in a strategic way. A bit worrying as he's in what has been identified as a key riding.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Apr, 2011 02:46 pm
@ehBeth,
voted

not green and not conservative

voted for one of the two candidates who has a chance of getting in
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Apr, 2011 02:47 pm
@ehBeth,
http://news.nationalpost.com/2011/04/22/advance-polls-across-canada-overflowing-with-voters/
0 Replies
 
realjohnboy
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Apr, 2011 06:36 pm
@ehBeth,
Ridings are districts?
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Apr, 2011 06:38 pm
@realjohnboy,
Set says that ridings are the same as congressional districts.
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Apr, 2011 04:58 am
@realjohnboy,
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electoral_district_(Canada)

An electoral district in Canada, also known as a constituency or a riding, is a geographically-based constituency upon which Canada's representative democracy is based. It is officially known in Canadian French as a circonscription, but frequently called a comté (county).

Federal electoral districts each return one Member of Parliament (MP) to the Canadian House of Commons; provincial or territorial electoral districts each return one representative — called, depending on the province or territory, Member of the Legislative Assembly (MLA), Member of the National Assembly (MNA), Member of Provincial Parliament (MPP) or Member of the House of Assembly (MHA) — to the provincial or territorial legislature.

While electoral districts in Canada are now exclusively single-member districts, in the past, multiple-member districts were used at both the federal and provincial levels. Alberta had a few districts in its history that returned from two up to seven members: see Calgary, Edmonton and Medicine Hat. British Columbia had a mix of multiple-member districts in Vancouver and single-member districts elsewhere until the 1991 election, and Prince Edward Island had dual-member districts until the 1996 election.

As of June 28, 2004, there were 308 federal electoral districts across Canada. Provinces will sometimes follow similar boundaries for their own provincial ridings — however, this is not always the case, nor is it required. The only province which currently does so is Ontario — at present, electoral districts in the Southern Ontario region use the same boundaries as their current federal counterparts following the 2004 boundary adjustment, while seats in the Northern Ontario region correspond to the federal districts that were in place before the 2004 adjustment. All other provinces have completely different federal and provincial ridings. Ontario also had separate provincial ridings prior to 1999.

Elections Canada is the independent body set up by parliament to oversee Canadian federal elections.

Originally, most electoral districts were equivalent to the counties used for local government, hence the French unofficial term comté. However, it became common, especially in Ontario, to divide counties with sufficient population to multiple electoral divisions; these became unofficially known as ridings, from an archaic British term denoting a subdivision of a county.

Soon after Confederation, the urban population grew — and more importantly, most city dwellers gained the franchise after property ownership was no longer required to gain the vote. Rural constituencies therefore became geographically larger through the 20th century and generally encompassed one or more counties each, and the word "riding" was then used to refer to any electoral division.

A political party's local organization is generally known as a riding association.

more info at the link
0 Replies
 
 

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