6
   

Awkward or not?

 
 
Reply Tue 22 Feb, 2011 08:32 pm
The context sounds somewhat awkward in my ears. You opinions are welcomed.

Plus, "mean" should be "means."

Am I on the right track?

Context:
By accessing the Science & Philosophy Chat Forums (hereinafter we, us, our, SPCF), you agree to be legally bound by the following terms. If you do not agree to be legally bound by all of the following terms then please do not access and/or use SPCF. We may change these at any time and we will do our utmost in informing you, though it would be prudent to review this regularly yourself as your continued usage of SPCF after changes mean you agree to be legally bound by these terms as they are updated and/or amended.
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Question • Score: 6 • Views: 1,625 • Replies: 31
No top replies

 
talk72000
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Feb, 2011 08:39 pm
@oristarA,
Quote:
We may change these at any time and we will do our utmost in informing you, ... your continued usage of SPCF after changes mean you agree to be legally bound by these terms as they are updated and/or amended.


Mean is plural so it is correct.
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Feb, 2011 08:43 pm
@oristarA,
Yeah, it is redundant. The first sentence is the only necessary one minus the parenthetical addition.

If there are changes, just change the terms. If they have to see the terms each time they access...viola.
0 Replies
 
ragnel
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Feb, 2011 09:49 pm
@talk72000,
Quote:
We may change these at any time and we will do our utmost in informing you, though it would be prudent to review this regularly yourself as your continued usage of SPCF after changes mean you agree to be legally bound by these terms as they are updated and/or amended.


Sorry, talk72000, I cannot agree with you. It should be 'means' as it refers to the singular 'your usage'.
laughoutlood
 
  0  
Reply Wed 23 Feb, 2011 12:16 am
@oristarA,
why fok ass on this

the entire passage is full of redundancy inapt changes in tense and reminds me of

umm err

crosswords
Wy
 
  1  
Reply Wed 23 Feb, 2011 02:01 pm
@oristarA,
It's "legalese"... language written specifically to try to cover all potential circumstances and close any loopholes. Whether it actually does or not varies with the document. That's why it sounds awkward; if it were written casually it could be made much more simple and clear.

And "means" would be correct.
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Wed 23 Feb, 2011 02:49 pm
@ragnel,
ragnel wrote:

Sorry, talk72000, I cannot agree with you. It should be 'means' as it refers to the singular 'your usage'.


I agree.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 23 Feb, 2011 03:35 pm
@laughoutlood,
laughoutlood wrote:

why fok ass on this

the entire passage is full of redundancy inapt changes in tense and reminds me of

umm err

crosswords



sold!

but ... do we expect scientists to write well?
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Wed 23 Feb, 2011 05:56 pm
@oristarA,
Quote:
The context sounds somewhat awkward in my ears.


The context sounds somewhat awkward [in] to my ears.
0 Replies
 
talk72000
 
  1  
Reply Wed 23 Feb, 2011 06:10 pm
@ragnel,
We may change these at any time and we will do our utmost in informing you, though it would be prudent to review this regularly yourself as your continued usage of SPCF after changes, mean you agree to be legally bound by these terms as they are updated and/or amended.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Wed 23 Feb, 2011 06:15 pm
@talk72000,
A simple repetition isn't much of an explanation, Talk.
talk72000
 
  1  
Reply Wed 23 Feb, 2011 07:10 pm
@JTT,
I was in the middle of explaining but my time ran out and was cut off. It is a legal logical argument. It is a complex sentence composed of many sub sentences:

Condition 1. We may change these at any time
Condition 2. We will do our utmost in informing you
Warning: It would be prudent to review this regularly yourself
Condition 3: Your continued usage of SPCF after changes

There should be a comma after "changes"

The "mean" refers to those conditions and therefore plural.

Logical conclusion: You agree to be legally bound by these terms as they are updated and/or amended

Quote:
We may change these at any time and we will do our utmost in informing you, though it would be prudent to review this regularly yourself as your continued usage of SPCF after changes mean you agree to be legally bound by these terms as they are updated and/or amended.
talk72000
 
  1  
Reply Wed 23 Feb, 2011 07:26 pm
@talk72000,
The word "mean" means "infer" therefore "You agree to be legally bound by these terms as they are updated and/or amended"
0 Replies
 
wayne
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Feb, 2011 12:03 pm
@talk72000,
Quote:
The "mean" refers to those conditions and therefore plural.



Sorry, but the word mean, in this sentence, refers to usage and should be means. If it refered to changes, mean would be right. As in the changes mean.
However, your continued usage, after changes, means. You're right about the comma.
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Feb, 2011 12:15 pm
@talk72000,
Darling,
The subject in that clause is usage, though to many it appears to be changes.
Changes is the object of the preposition - not the subject.

Usage is the word that directs the writer in choosing whether the verb is singular or plural.

"usage" is singular - requiring the singular "mean"...

Don't get balled up - It is a common mistake - especially when the object of the preposition is right beside the verb... it sounds right...

JTT
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Feb, 2011 01:17 pm
@Lash,
Quote:
"usage" is singular - requiring the singular "mean"...


Lash, of course, meant to write 'means.

0 Replies
 
talk72000
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Feb, 2011 02:57 pm
@Lash,
Quote:
By accessing the Science & Philosophy Chat Forums (hereinafter we, us, our, SPCF), you agree to be legally bound by the following terms.

If you do not agree to be legally bound by all of the following terms then please do not access and/or use SPCF



It is not usage. They want you legally bound and the "terms" are the "changes" not the usage. You can "use" it as long as you agree to their "terms".

It is CONDITONAL usage.
talk72000
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Feb, 2011 05:07 pm
It shows how lawyers are great constructors of complex sentences to put the blame on you. Notice the contract one must sign are in small print. Gotcha contracts. Mr. Green
talk72000
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Feb, 2011 05:26 pm
The various interpretations show legalese can confuse people easily. Not used to logical arguments can be rough especially not it is not written in standard 'If ... condition ...therefore...conclusion' form but in accusatory form such as above.
0 Replies
 
InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Feb, 2011 05:36 pm
@talk72000,
talk72000 wrote:

It is not usage. They want you legally bound and the "terms" are the "changes" not the usage. You can "use" it as long as you agree to their "terms".

It is CONDITONAL usage.


The words "terms" and "changes" aren't even in the same sentence that the words "usage" and "mean" are.

The gist of the offending phrase in which the latter two words appear is:

. . .your continued usage. . . means. . .
 

Related Topics

deal - Question by WBYeats
Let pupils abandon spelling rules, says academic - Discussion by Robert Gentel
Please, I need help. - Question by imsak
Is this sentence grammatically correct? - Question by Sydney-Strock
"come from" - Question by mcook
concentrated - Question by WBYeats
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Awkward or not?
Copyright © 2024 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.07 seconds on 07/19/2024 at 11:38:01