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Struggling With a Story

 
 
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2010 07:20 am
Hi guys,
I'm trying to translate this story on my own time and I'll admit, I'm rather confused. I'm either completely translating it wrong or the meaning is lost on me.

Ridebis, et rideas.
You will laugh, and let you laugh.

Ego, ille quem cognovisti, apros tres pulcherrimos cepi. “Ipse cepisti?” inquis.
I,????, seized three very beautiful boards. "Did I myself capture them?" you ask.

Ipse cepi; non tamen ita feci ut ab quiete mea discederem. Ad retia eram;
I myself seized; nevertheless I did not do so to depart from my rest. I was at the nets;

habebam non venabulum sed stylum; cogitabam de aliquo scribebamque, ut—si vacuas manus reportarem—plenas tamen tabellas reportarem.
I did not have a hunting lance but a pen; I did not think about someone and I was writing, in order that, if I report empty hands, I might nevertheless report full writing tablets.

Hoc studium tibi non culpandum est; nunc cognosco quomodo animus corpore moto excitetur.
This study must not be censured by you; I now know in what way the spirit is stirred up by an aroused body.

Arbores enim et illud silentium, quod mihi aucupanti datur, magna beneficia scriptori sunt.
Even the trees and that silence which is given to....

I have no idea what I'm even talking about at this point >.< Any help would be great!!
 
George
 
  3  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2010 10:02 am
@wildflower92490,
Quote:
Ridebis, et rideas.
You will laugh, and let you laugh.

This simply means I know you'll laugh at this and you are welcome
to do so.

Quote:
Ego, ille quem cognovisti, apros tres pulcherrimos cepi. "Ipse
cepisti?" inquis.

I,????, seized three very beautiful boards. "Did I myself capture
them?" you ask.

"Ille quem cognovisti", "he whom you have known well" plus the explicit
use of "Ego" is meant to emphasize that the writer did what follows
even though it is out of character for him.

He "captured boars", not "seized boards".

Quote:
Ipse cepi; non tamen ita feci ut ab quiete mea discederem. Ad retia
eram;

I myself seized; nevertheless I did not do so to depart from my
rest. I was at the nets;

Ipse cepi again empahasizes that he himself captured them.
He goes on to say that he didn't do this to change his usual idle
ways, that is, he hasn't turned into an outdoorsman.

Quote:
habebam non venabulum sed stylum; cogitabam de aliquo scribebamque,
ut—si vacuas manus reportarem—plenas tamen tabellas reportarem.

I did not have a hunting lance but a pen; I did not think about
someone and I was writing, in order that, if I report empty hands, I
might nevertheless report full writing tablets.

While he was waiting at the nets, the nets he would use to capture the
boars, he wasn't holding his hunting spear, but a pen. Once again, he
emphasizes that he is at heart a writer, not a hunter. He says that
even if he came back with empty hands, his notebook would at least be
full.

Quote:
Hoc studium tibi non culpandum est; nunc cognosco quomodo animus
corpore moto excitetur.

This study must not be censured by you; I now know in what way the
spirit is stirred up by an aroused body.

He is saying don't think any less of me for studying this way - I've
found that bodily exercise stimulates the mind.

Quote:
Arbores enim et illud silentium, quod mihi aucupanti datur, magna
beneficia scriptori sunt.

Even the trees and that silence which is given to....

. . . me as I lie in wait are of great service to an author.


So, what motivated you to read Pliny?
wildflower92490
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2010 02:52 pm
@George,
I've attempted to read a little bit by every Roman author I come to and I had been putting off Pliny for a while. I found this lower skilled adaptation and wanted to try : ) I'm not yet experience enough with Latin to do much more.

Is this right? I was somewhat confused after "sed."
Ergo ubi aucupabis, tu quoque tabellas tecum habeas: videbis non apros sed sapientiam per montes errare.

Therefore when you will hunt, you also should have a writing tablet with you: you will not see the boars but ... to wander through the mountains.

**after looking at it again--could it be something along the lines of "you will see that not only boars but also a wise woman wander through the mountains?" I know that's usually non solo...sed etiam, but it makes more sense I think.
George
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2010 03:07 pm
@wildflower92490,
I think you're correct.
I'd say "wisdom", rather than "a wise woman", though.
wildflower92490
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2010 03:11 pm
@George,
Thanks!
George
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2010 03:21 pm
@wildflower92490,
You're welcome.
Nice conversing with you.
0 Replies
 
 

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