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Is this sentence correct both grammatically and syntactically?

 
 
Razer
 
Reply Wed 20 Oct, 2010 04:18 pm
Sentence: I sincerely feel my hero Rahul G should not go for the Who Wants To Be a Millionaire show.

Context to understand the sentence Rahul, the name mentioned in the sentence is a name of a important politician and the show Who Wants To Be a Millionaire is being referred actually to its local Asian version. The mentioned politician has got an offer from the host to do an episode.

Now my question: Is my sentence correct grammatically and syntactically? I want to confirm because the way I've used the word "my hero" before the word Rahul in the sentence.

Thanks and Regards
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Type: Question • Score: 2 • Views: 2,187 • Replies: 4
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JTT
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Oct, 2010 04:47 pm
@Razer,
Quote:
Sentence: I sincerely feel my hero Rahul G should not go for the Who Wants To Be a Millionaire show.

CHANGE:

Context to understand the sentence Rahul, the name mentioned in the sentence is a name of a important politician and the show Who Wants To Be a Millionaire is being referred actually to its local Asian version. The mentioned politician has got an offer from the host to do an episode.

Now my question: Is my sentence correct grammatically and syntactically? I want to confirm because the way I've used the word "my hero" before the word Rahul in the sentence.


CHANGE: I sincerely feel my hero, Rahul G, should not go for the Who Wants To Be a Millionaire show.

It's grammatical, Razer. "go for" doesn't sound completely natural, though it could if the context was there.

I sincerely feel my hero, Rahul G, should not go for the offer to go on the Who Wants To Be a Millionaire show.

I sincerely feel my hero, Rahul G, should not go on the Who Wants To Be a Millionaire show.

Razer
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Oct, 2010 05:09 pm
@JTT,
Thanks a million JTT Smile . You are, as always, very helpful. Smile
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laughoutlood
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Oct, 2010 11:42 pm
@Razer,
Respected politicians of Rahul G's ilk should not appear on Who Wants to be a Millionaire.
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contrex
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Oct, 2010 12:53 am
"Go for" is idiomatic (slang, informal, conversational). In any case one does not "go for" a TV show. One goes for a goal or target. "Participate in" is an example of a more formal substitute.
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