10
   

Does free will exist?

 
 
argome321
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Feb, 2015 05:20 pm
@neologist,
Quote:
If there were no free will, we could save a lot of money on jails . . . . .

How would that work? Society would still need protection
neologist
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Feb, 2015 07:50 pm
@argome321,
Lack of free will would be an affirmative defense.
argome321
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Feb, 2015 09:09 pm
@neologist,
Quote:
Lack of free will would be an affirmative defense.


But how does that protect society?
north
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 May, 2015 03:55 pm
@argome321,

Free Will exits within the consciousness of the frontal lobe of the brain , which analyses the sub-conscious thoughts or conclusions .

neologist
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 May, 2015 04:24 pm
@argome321,
It would not
0 Replies
 
neologist
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 May, 2015 04:28 pm
@north,
north wrote:
Free Will exits . . .
Ahh, yes. For some, free will exits by way of some chemical. C2H5OH used to do it for me.
north
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 May, 2015 04:37 pm
@neologist,
neologist wrote:

north wrote:
Free Will exits . . .
Ahh, yes. For some, free will exits by way of some chemical. C2H5OH used to do it for me.


What is this chemical ?
GorDie
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jul, 2015 11:03 am
@Diogenes phil,
Free will. I entered your yard and kicked your dog. I pissed on your steps. I threw a rock through your window that I picked up in the neighbours yard.

You would be criminally insane to suggest that was not free will. Therefor the debate is redundant.

The brain is capable of freezing time, being able to perceive the surroundings as a super-facility for analyzing the energies of the universe. In this Super-facility, is the manifestation of Free-will. To over-come mathematical destiny.

Energies build in your brain, and are justly separate from free-moving energy. It is a complex hive of energy from the Past, and the determinable future (regarding momentum, and inanimate objects.)
neologist
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jul, 2015 11:59 am
@north,
north wrote:
Free Will exits . . .
neologist wrote:
Ahh, yes. For some, free will exits by way of some chemical. C2H5OH used to do it for me.
north wrote:
What is this chemical ?
That would be booze
0 Replies
 
Krumple
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jul, 2015 01:39 pm
@GorDie,
GorDie wrote:

Free will. I entered your yard and kicked your dog. I pissed on your steps. I threw a rock through your window that I picked up in the neighbours yard.

You would be criminally insane to suggest that was not free will. Therefor the debate is redundant.


There is an aspect that you completely ignore. What is the motivation? If you are compelled to make a decision perhaps there is more going on than just thinking you have free will. If this motivation is driven by predestined actions then you really had no free will, instead you are at the mercy of predestination.
GorDie
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 6 Jul, 2015 01:50 pm
@Krumple,
You're clinically insane to advocate or defend the notion of not having free-will. You are attempting to justify all criminal behaviour and arrogance. Maybe you should just shut up and agree with what I said.
Or maybe, you should consider that when considering Motivation, you are not "thinking you have free will" and acknowledge the flaws of your debate (grammatically).
When you rationalize your choices based on the predestined actions that effect your decision making you are in fact just making a choice.
Krumple
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jul, 2015 01:55 pm
@GorDie,
GorDie wrote:

You're clinically insane to advocate or defend the notion of not having free-will. You are attempting to justify all criminal behaviour and arrogance. Maybe you should just shut up and agree with what I said.
Or maybe, you should consider that when considering Motivation, you are not "thinking you have free will" and acknowledge the flaws of your debate (grammatically).
When you rationalize your choices based on the predestined actions that effect your decision making you are in fact just making a choice.


So you say the same about people with chemical imbalances in their brain which compels them to behave counter to how they would without this imbalance? I guess that is insane too right? Do you want to argue there is no such thing as a chemical imbalance. Maybe it's just demons right?

There is no free will, it is an illusion.
0 Replies
 
neologist
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jul, 2015 01:57 pm
@GorDie,
GorDie wrote:
You're clinically insane to advocate or defend the notion of not having free-will . . .
This is Krumple you're talking to.



Wink
0 Replies
 
Fil Albuquerque
 
  2  
Reply Mon 6 Jul, 2015 08:43 pm
@GorDie,
You are pathetic...you are the one who is clinically insane for advocating free will...it both requires agent causation and agent separation from the world causation. You get ZERO for LOGIC noob !
neologist
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jul, 2015 11:14 pm
@Fil Albuquerque,
Yeah, but. . .
Tell that to the judge, Fil.
0 Replies
 
Thomas33
 
  1  
Reply Sun 31 Jul, 2016 03:31 pm
Yes. But it's balanced with principle.
0 Replies
 
rubbywilliams
 
  0  
Reply Mon 1 Aug, 2016 12:13 am
Does free will a mistake? It's a pretty debatable thing.
0 Replies
 
thoth
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Aug, 2016 03:17 pm
@Diogenes phil,
I think of it like this. Your free to do what you want within your material limitations. Their is still a greater organism your part of so when something goes wrong free will disappears. Like when you get sick and your body that was free rolling goes into lock down immune system over ride and does what it was built to do. Free will exists to a certain extent as long your not messing with the status quo to much.
0 Replies
 
RandyS
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Oct, 2017 12:54 pm
@Diogenes phil,
Diogenes;154667 wrote:

Quote:
Can some one basically summarize the arguments FOR and AGAINST free will, and summarize the POSITIONS of those FOR and AGAINST free will? Thanks!


Hi Diogenes phil,

The direct answer to your question, "does free will exist?" is no.

"Free will," unfortunately is a concept with roots firmly in theology from where it found its way into philosophy along with much confusion. One version of determinism comes from theology (predestination, for example).

The better term for human choice is, "volition," which means, all human behavior which is strictly human behavior (excluding reflexes, the autonomic nervous system, and biological functions) must be consciously chosen--every thought, every choice, and every overt action.

Those who deny human beings are volitional fall into one of three categories according to what they believe determines human behavior:

Supernatural determinism--God or some other supernatural agency determines everything, including human behavior;

Physicalist determinism--everything is physical and all physical behavior is determined by the laws of the physical sciences. Physicalists believe that the physical brain is the source of consciousness, and since the brain conforms to physical laws all the behavior of the brain must be determined by physical laws. Some are consistent enough to admit that all we believe we think, choose, and do consciously is an illusion.

Biological/environmental determinism--is not strict determinism but does believe that some degree of human behavior is determined by an individual's hereditary characteristics, environment influences (from birth to culture to society) or other physical causes.

The view that human beings are volitional beings required by their nature to consciously choose everything they think, choose, and do rejects all forms of determinism. As a consequence the strict volitionist view means that every human being is responsible for every aspect of his life because it is consciously chosen.

I personally believe human beings are volitional beings.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

How can we be sure? - Discussion by Raishu-tensho
DOES NOTHING EXIST??? - Question by mark noble
Proof of nonexistence of free will - Discussion by litewave
morals and ethics, how are they different? - Question by existential potential
Destroy My Belief System, Please! - Discussion by Thomas
Star Wars in Philosophy. - Discussion by Logicus
Existence of Everything. - Discussion by Logicus
Is it better to be feared or loved? - Discussion by Black King
 
Copyright © 2017 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 10/23/2017 at 05:39:15