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Obese Americans now outweigh the merely overweight

 
 
Reply Fri 9 Jan, 2009 07:40 pm
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The number of obese American adults outweighs the number of those who are merely overweight, according to the latest statistics from the federal government.
Numbers posted by the National Center for Health Statistics show that more than 34 percent of Americans are obese, compared to 32.7 percent who are overweight. It said just under 6 percent are "extremely" obese.
"More than one-third of adults, or over 72 million people, were obese in 2005-2006, the NCHS said in its report.
The numbers are based on a survey of 4,356 adults over the age of 20 who take part in a regular government survey of health, said the NCHS, which is part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
The figures come from the 2005-2006 survey and are the most current available.
"During the physical examination, conducted in mobile examination centers, height and weight were measured as part of a more comprehensive set of body measurements," the NCHS report said.
"Although the prevalence of obesity has more than doubled since 1980, the prevalence of overweight has remained stable over the same time period," it said.
Obesity and overweight are calculated using a formula called body mass index. BMI is equal to weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared. Someone with a BMI of 25 to 29 is classified as overweight, 30 to 40 counts as obese and people with BMIs of 40 or more are morbidly obese.
A person 5 feet 5 inches tall becomes overweight at 150 pounds (68 kg) and obese at 180 pounds (82 kg). The U.S. National Institutes of Health has an online BMI calculator at www.nhlbisupport.com/bmi/.
In the 1988-1994 surveys, 33 percent of Americans were overweight, 22.9 percent were obese and 2.9 percent were morbidly obese. The numbers have edged up steadily since.
Being overweight or obese raises the risk of heart disease, diabetes, some cancers, arthritis and other conditions.
In May, the CDC reported that 32 percent of U.S. children fit the definition of being overweight, 16 percent were obese and 11 percent were extremely obese.
Childhood and adult obesity has emerged as a growing problem not only in the United States but also in many countries around the world.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 1,954 • Replies: 33
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Leonard
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Aug, 2009 06:26 pm
@Pythagorean,
Interesting. It's somewhat odd how everyone around here is only a little overweight, average, or underweight. Thanks for the BMI calculator link as well. But honestly, it's strange how some people buy lard in bucketfuls and pig out, then wonder why they are fat or have diabetes.
richrf
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Aug, 2009 10:07 pm
@Leonard,
I am always amazed by the incredible elasticity of skin and the stomach.

Rich
Shadow Dragon
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Aug, 2009 10:48 pm
@Pythagorean,
I really don't get how people can let themselves go like that... says the pot to the kettle. :ashamed: Ok, I'm far from being the best example of keeping in shape, but I can't imagine not trying to get healthier when it starts heavily affecting the way you live.
0 Replies
 
salima
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Aug, 2009 12:22 am
@richrf,
richrf;83163 wrote:
I am always amazed by the incredible elasticity of skin and the stomach.

Rich


unfortunately the elasticity doesnt last forever. whoever wants to do so should lose it when they are young because it might take a lot of corrective surgery to get things back in order if old age sets in.

---------- Post added 08-15-2009 at 12:04 PM ----------

it is quite interesting to see obesity becoming a problem in india. from the most affluent down to the poorest of the poor, you find it directly related to the level of income.
Khethil
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Aug, 2009 09:46 am
@salima,
I have a thought on this that doesn't excuse, but might - in part - explain this. I'm curious what others think on this, here it is:[INDENT]1. Humans, in general, tend towards behaviors and situations that are easier, faster, more productive, etc. As I see it, this would apply to everything from making a better campfire to the invention of the wheel (saving many backaches!).
[/INDENT][INDENT]2. While this tendency has made life 'easier', in terms of effort for many, it leads to a lack of exercise.
[/INDENT][INDENT]3. Compounding this is the availability of fantastically-tasting foods in vast quantities and the ability to 'experience', learn, laugh and play without every getting off ones' butt.
[/INDENT][INDENT]4. It makes sense to me that all this is so much more prevalent in the United States given most citizens' access to so very much entertainment and food sources.

5. Where these conditions exist, yet obesity isn't as much of a problem, this - I believe - is likely due to cultural norms already in place that mitigate their negative effects.
[/INDENT]If all this has any ring of truth, it means: a) This isn't something endemic to Americans, so much as it speaks to behavioral tendencies of humans in general. b) The only way to enjoy such entertainment and sustenance bounty without blowing up like a balloon would be through self-discipline and/or cultural motivators - neither of which the U.S. has in place, enough, to stave off these detrimental conditions.

I see no single solution; whether we continue our descent into big-tummy territory or adjust towards the more healthy will depend on a thousand factors. It'll be interesting to see.

Thanks

---------- Post added 08-15-2009 at 10:48 AM ----------

salima;83394 wrote:
... it is quite interesting to see obesity becoming a problem in india. from the most affluent down to the poorest of the poor, you find it directly related to the level of income.


I've seen this too and often wondered why. Thus far, I've resolved this to be due to Food becoming a relatively cheap source of 'entertainment'. It could also be the foods themselves, that folks are eating. Good observation
richrf
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Aug, 2009 11:17 am
@Khethil,
Khethil;83443 wrote:


I see no single solution; whether we continue our descent into big-tummy territory or adjust towards the more healthy will depend on a thousand factors. It'll be interesting to see., that folks are eating. Good observation


I agree that there is probably no single solution, but if I was to point to one thing, I would say it is the gradual change to a very sedentary lifestyle since the 1950s.

Children spend too much time at school desks, because of the focus on reading, mathematics, spelling, etc. They really, really should be out playing more.

Adults, nowadays, are spending too much time at desks - everywhere. This sedentary lifestyle leads to stagnation within the body fluids, and people just cannot move any longer. It is like starting a car when the engine is cold.

I think we need a lot more movement in the U.S.

Rich
0 Replies
 
Justin
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Aug, 2009 11:49 am
@Pythagorean,
Hmm, interesting posts.

Here are some of my thoughts on the matter.

I think obesity is more a disease of the mind. That state being the state of fear of lack or fear of not having enough. Fear that there isn't enough to go around. In America the fear is present and collectively spreading into other countries through the resonance of this collective consciousness. As people resonate on that vibrational level of energy and thought, that which we give fear to or effort to try to fix actually creates the opposite effects.

Like the 100th monkey syndrome. Science has found that if you take rats in one country and teach them to go through a maze, after the colony of rats or a certain number of rats have gone through the maze and learned the maze, other rats in other countries vibrating on the same or similar level of consciousness are also able to easily go through the maze. The 100th number or thereabouts represents the critical point of graduation for a thought to vibrate throughout the entire world.

Likewise with obesity, America is an obese country and it's spreading throughout the population not necessarily due to what we eat but the vibratory level of our thinking or imagining. Collectively it's spreading and collectively it's gaining in strength and collectively it effects not just the community but the entire world. I don't believe at all it's due to what we eat because what we eat is not what we are, what we think is what we are.

So the solution to the problem lies much deeper than changing ones diet or putting regulations on food consumption or anything else. Obesity IMHO is a state of mind that is growing in strength and numbers and reinforcing itself with those who resonate on the vibratory level of fear and lack.
richrf
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Aug, 2009 12:07 pm
@Justin,
Justin;83458 wrote:
So the solution to the problem lies much deeper than changing ones diet or putting regulations on food consumption or anything else. Obesity IMHO is a state of mind that is growing in strength and numbers and reinforcing itself with those who resonate on the vibratory level of fear and lack.


Hi Justin,

What you say can very well be what is happening at a very deep level. It sounds right to me.

However, I think that it is easier to change things by approaching it indirectly. That is, by creating a healthier body you can effect a healthier mind. This is one of the tenets of Eastern health practices such as Tai Chi and Yoga. One effects the other. Though breathing exercises and relaxed meditation are very nice also.

Rich
Labyrinth
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Aug, 2009 04:25 pm
@richrf,
I'm not knowledgeable on the condition of obesity, but does anyone see it broken down to almost purely a management problem? I can't help seeing it as a parallel to money mismanagement (we're basically talking about caloric debt). As we have many obese persons, monetary debt is also notoriously widespread.

Is America's culture the leading spring? Buy and/or eat now & pay later? American ecomony seeks fuel from buyers who act immediately on objective sensuality while lacking the deeper thought on future results. Just watch commercials or take a gander at some of the posters up on fast-food restaurants' windows. We're spurred to follow the gut and not the brain. Heck, many restaurants don't even risk you having a second thought about that caloric megaton while you're parking your car and walking in (just take the drive-thru!). The gratification of too many now's leads to crushing backload later.

So I agree with the above comment on it hinging on a state of mind, but its being as widespread as it is also screams culture.

But I also have noticed there is a type of obesity that seems centered on guilt. Think of the obese guy you see in public eating nothing but a salad. Now picture him at home with the shades drawn pigging out. Wonder what that's all about. Sometimes I really feel for these certain individuals.
0 Replies
 
salima
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Aug, 2009 07:59 pm
@Justin,
Justin;83458 wrote:
Hmm, interesting posts.

Here are some of my thoughts on the matter.

I think obesity is more a disease of the mind. That state being the state of fear of lack or fear of not having enough. Fear that there isn't enough to go around.

So the solution to the problem lies much deeper than changing ones diet or putting regulations on food consumption or anything else. .


hi justin-
you are certainly right that obesity is often caused by psychological factors, and there are more of them than the fear of not being enough to go around. that is probably one of the top ones in india- i also see another as being a reaction to the equating of slimness with poverty; in other words, overweight is actually admired here because it is the opposite of one who exhibits a life of poverty. it is different than what you mention in the sense that it is a sort of false pride, a way of proclaiming superiority, much the same as buying something as a status symbol. it is the opposite to the problem in america of the media portraying thinness as an ideal and symbol of one's value. cultural attitudes...

there is the obvious compensation oreaction of trying to fill an emptiness in one's life by filling the stomach, which i find most prevalent in america.

there is the learned behavior of rewarding oneself for 'being good' with food, which was done in my youth in many families as a form of discipline (one having negative ramifications) and also is done here in india. also bribing children to 'be good' causes this type of psychology when the child grows up. 'clean your room, you can have a chocolate.' this is widespread.

overeating can even become a way of rebellion in the psyche-as a child if one is told 'dont eat that, it isnt good for you' when he grows up he may develop the attitude 'oh yeah? watch me!'

there is of course the issue of addiction-to refined sugar as a substance that can easily be abused, and the issue of habit itself.
even boredom can be an underlying reason for why people overeat.

i believe psychological reasons are at the basis of the problem, as they are with everything else in life. there are many 'philosophies of food'. but again even knowing why a person is overeating does not necessarily produce a way of changing the behavior.

i also find it most interesting that it is almost exclusively a human problem-of course dogs, who in my mind have been domesticated to the point of neurosis, also share the propensity.
0 Replies
 
Shadow Dragon
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Aug, 2009 08:05 pm
@Pythagorean,
Labyrinth, I have to agree that culture does add in to the equation. Though wealth is also a major factor. For instance, back in the middle ages and during the Roman era, it was a sign of nobility to be over weight. The rich/upper-class lead more leisurely lives and can easily get all the food they want.

Now, translating that into modern times, it's no wonder the U.S. is where a modern obesity epidemic has started. We are not only a wealthy country in terms of money, but we are also one of the major food producing countries in the world, which means that the majority of food produced here is incredibly cheap. And in turn European countries and India are also following this trend.

Also, humans have an instinctual need to eat a lot whenever we get the chance. Our species (homo-Sapiens) evolved in desert regions around the Nile in northern Africa and the Middle East. Needless to say, in these regions before the advent of agriculture, actual meals were few and far inbetween. We needed to eat all we could whenever given the chance to. Though now it's an old instinct that has out lived it's usefullness.
0 Replies
 
prothero
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Aug, 2009 10:04 pm
@Pythagorean,
Well human metabolism evolved in a time of scarcity. The body can extract almost every useful calorie from anything you eat. Any calorie not used will be stored for later use. A pound of fat at 454 grams and 9 calories a gram has about 4000 calories. It takes several days or several hours of hard exercise to burn 4000 calories. The basics of weight loss are not low protein, low carbs, low fats or any other specialty diet but either eating fewer calories or burning more calories.

I liked this recent advice
Eat real food, mostly plants, not too much.

I just can not miss the pun involved in saying
the number of obese americans out weighs or
obese americans now outweigh, I hope that was intentional.
0 Replies
 
Aedes
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Aug, 2009 07:02 am
@Pythagorean,
Obesity is a worldwide epidemic, including in the emerging middle classes in impoverished countries. When working in Ghana I saw lots of highly obese patients with uncontrolled hypertension, diabetes, stroke, and heart failure.

As Prothero mentioned, our culinary technology has evolved a lot faster than our bodies. Even something as simple as cooking has made calories bioavailable from food that when eaten raw would impart fewer.

The biggest problem in my mind in the US is that obesity disproportionately affects the poor, and this is because poor quality food is cheaper and opportunities for exercise more scarce.
Justin
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Aug, 2009 09:32 am
@Aedes,
richrf;83463 wrote:
However, I think that it is easier to change things by approaching it indirectly. That is, by creating a healthier body you can effect a healthier mind. This is one of the tenets of Eastern health practices such as Tai Chi and Yoga. One effects the other. Though breathing exercises and relaxed meditation are very nice also.

I completely understand what you are saying by approaching it indirectly but in essence I see that as upside down. Our body is an effect so if we treat the effect we're going to have side effects. Breathing and meditation are wonderful but still yet effects of the cause. So going deeper into the rabbit hole and not making the effects the cause we focus on most intently on repairing.

Meditation was one of the messages behind the life of Christ and it's very important to knowing the inner self. This alone, as the consciousness level be raised will transform the entire human race and obesity is but a mere illusion and/or effect of a single cause of which mankind knows not. --- That last sentence just came out. LOL.

Labyrinth;83491 wrote:
I'm not knowledgeable on the condition of obesity, but does anyone see it broken down to almost purely a management problem? I can't help seeing it as a parallel to money mismanagement (we're basically talking about caloric debt). As we have many obese persons, monetary debt is also notoriously widespread.

Well, obesity is an effect on humanity. It's caused by a number of other effects but it's still an effect. So dealing with an obesity problem from the standpoint of dealing with the numbers and correcting the diet is short term and does not last. Obesity is something that person is reflecting from within. Obesity displayed in the body is an effect of obesity of the mind. Diet and calories are as important as we allow them to be but in all reality, we transmute naturally, the food we eat. Either way, obesity is physical manifestation of a seed of thought. It cannot come to pass without first the thought of it.

Labyrinth;83491 wrote:
Is America's culture the leading spring? Buy and/or eat now & pay later? American ecomony seeks fuel from buyers who act immediately on objective sensuality while lacking the deeper thought on future results. Just watch commercials or take a gander at some of the posters up on fast-food restaurants' windows. We're spurred to follow the gut and not the brain. Heck, many restaurants don't even risk you having a second thought about that caloric megaton while you're parking your car and walking in (just take the drive-thru!). The gratification of too many now's leads to crushing backload later.

So I agree with the above comment on it hinging on a state of mind, but its being as widespread as it is also screams culture.

But I also have noticed there is a type of obesity that seems centered on guilt. Think of the obese guy you see in public eating nothing but a salad. Now picture him at home with the shades drawn pigging out. Wonder what that's all about. Sometimes I really feel for these certain individuals.

You've made some good points. Many people put on a show for themselves or others but behind closed doors they're eating garbage and gorging themselves.

For solutions they are on the net searching for all these diets to help them lose weight and make a lifetime of experimenting with trying to lose weight with medication or technique. What we do not understand is that our problem with obesity is not something that can be cured permanently with diet and exercise. It's who we are so we have to go deeper.

It's easy to feel for the victims of obesity because it may be ourselves. When the pain of another is shared and experienced with empathy, we know we're human. It's painful to be obese but so long as we work on obesity, the more obese our world will become.

Shadow Dragon;83517 wrote:
Labyrinth, I have to agree that culture does add in to the equation. Though wealth is also a major factor. For instance, back in the middle ages and during the Roman era, it was a sign of nobility to be over weight. The rich/upper-class lead more leisurely lives and can easily get all the food they want.

Now, translating that into modern times, it's no wonder the U.S. is where a modern obesity epidemic has started. We are not only a wealthy country in terms of money, but we are also one of the major food producing countries in the world, which means that the majority of food produced here is incredibly cheap. And in turn European countries and India are also following this trend.

Wealthy is not necessarily true as we are the most in debt country. I believe we consume more than we produce.

Shadow Dragon;83517 wrote:
Also, humans have an instinctual need to eat a lot whenever we get the chance. Our species (homo-Sapiens) evolved in desert regions around the Nile in northern Africa and the Middle East. Needless to say, in these regions before the advent of agriculture, actual meals were few and far inbetween. We needed to eat all we could whenever given the chance to. Though now it's an old instinct that has out lived it's usefullness.

Today obesity is an effect of depression, fear, and all those other things and it feeds itself with itself.

Aedes;83567 wrote:
The biggest problem in my mind in the US is that obesity disproportionately affects the poor, and this is because poor quality food is cheaper and opportunities for exercise more scarce.

It proportionally effects the poor and what's available to consume is a choice. Exercise is a choice as well, but exercise doesn't solve the problem as the deep seeded fear and lack are still present. Usually you'll find the poor to be poor minded. Poor in mind often reflects poverty and poverty seeks out more poverty. Obesity the same way. I don't believe for a moment that the problem lies in what we eat because what we eat is merely an effect of what we choose to eat. Exercise is available for free but it takes getting off ones rump and a decision to stop being the 'victim' and actually do something about it. I'm amazed at how many poor people and obese people consider themselves victims. That mentality alone creates the opposite of what they desire.
Aedes
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Aug, 2009 10:23 am
@Justin,
Justin;83576 wrote:
what's available to consume is a choice
Not on a budget. Fresh fruits and vegetables are more expensive, less easily available, and less satiating. There is plenty of sociology research correlating food choice with income. Part of this is real and part of this is perceived.
Also, people who live in low socioeconomic status neighborhoods have fewer healthy choices available.

Lower Income Neighborhoods Have Less Healthy Food Choices - Associated Content
Income and food cost concerns affect diet: study | Global Industries | Health & Drugs | Reuters
Food Standards Agency - Low Income Diet and Nutrition Survey
FHA - Factors affecting low-income women's food choices and the perceived impact of dietary intake and socioeconomic status on their health and weight - Article Summary
Can Low-Income Americans Afford a Healthy Diet? - Amber Waves-November 2008


Justin;83576 wrote:
exercise doesn't solve the problem as the deep seeded fear and lack are still present
I can show you data that exercise WILL solve the problem. You cannot show me data that "deep seated fear" has anything to do with it.

Justin;83576 wrote:
Usually you'll find the poor to be poor minded.
Justin, I've practiced medicine in inner cities and in third world countries since 1996 and I've worked with a lot of impoverished people, probably in the thousands; I've been to their houses, and I've gotten to know them over years as my clinic patients -- and for what it's worth, I don't remotely agree with your generalization. Speaking generally, I've found poor people to be more content, more optimistic, and less overwhelmed with trivia and competitiveness than wealthy people.

Justin;83576 wrote:
Exercise is available for free but it takes getting off ones rump
Sure, if you're into powerwalking in the ghetto then it's available for free. But there has been plenty of research showing that dangerous neighborhoods are a major impediment to people seeking exercise. There is also the issue of lack of time, because many are working multiple jobs or overtime and many have children in broken households.
0 Replies
 
Justin
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Aug, 2009 11:01 am
@Pythagorean,
Paul, I'm sorry to disagree but I do. As a doctor you treat symptoms. Symptoms are effects, they are symptoms. So when you diagnose a symptom you then treat that symptom. The treatment of the symptom usually carries side effects. We people, focus too much on the symptoms or effects rather than looking at the cause.

So, if one doesn't want to powerwalk in the hood, then spend 50 cents or a coupon on the bus ride to get out and powerwalk in the park. Instead of this they buy fancy big TV's laying around being victims of their circumstances rather than doing something about it to change them.

All the evidence in the world won't change my mind on this. The fact are the facts, we work on the symptoms or effects and seem to create more of what we are trying to fix. The evidence is overwhelming that treating an effect as if it were the cause is counter productive.

Your education has conditioned you to take a look at symptoms and then treat them. All doctors do this and likewise so do governments, people and everyone else. We are blind to the causes and too focused on symptoms.
Aedes
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Aug, 2009 11:36 am
@Justin,
Justin;83585 wrote:
Paul, I'm sorry to disagree but I do. As a doctor you treat symptoms.
This is NOT what doctors treat. We treat pathophysiology, i.e. disease processes. Symptoms are but a signpost that directs us to a pathophysiologic or syndromic diagnosis.

Justin;83585 wrote:
All the evidence in the world won't change my mind on this. The fact are the facts.
Yup, the facts are the facts, as demonstrated by evidence.

This body being but an expression of the mind is a nice allegory, but it is not a supportable statement of fact.
0 Replies
 
Justin
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Aug, 2009 12:11 pm
@Pythagorean,
Well if this in fact were the case, why is it we are declining, gaining weight and our civilization is slowly destroying itself?

I know that when I go to the doctor they ask me, what are your experiencing. I give them my symptoms and they prescribe medication or otherwise. When a doctor treats cancer they are treating a symptom of a much greater and unknown cause. Again if this were not the case, how come all this is spreading so quickly?

Go back to the 60's when people were more carefree and obesity wasn't as much of a problem. Now today, with the installation of fear and lack, our society has steadily declined yet the number of doctors and scientific findings continue to increase? Our world continues to spiral downward and new diseases are being found all the time.

A syndromic diagnosis that ignores the thought vibration of energy within the soul of humanity is ignoring the problem completely. We are energy we are not body. Our body is but a physical manifestation of energy. Diagnosis of something that can be treated may solve certain problems temporarily but as we see today from yesterday, it's obviously not working as one should expect it to. Why is that? It's because we ignore the power of our mind and the power of creation and of course, the balance within the body which can be altered by the mind.
William
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Aug, 2009 04:56 pm
@Justin,
Justin;83458 wrote:
I think obesity is more a disease of the mind. .


Hello Justin. If you change the word "disease" to "dis-ease", IMO it would be more appropriate, I think. It is a "disturbed state of mind", but a natural state for "some people" and it is out of their control. The "gravity impaired" person (ha) I like to refer to has not more control over the way they are and to "assume" that are doing "something wrong" only makes the situation worse. I will explain more below.

Justin;83458 wrote:
That state being the state of fear of lack or fear of not having enough..


Yes, you could say that by all appearances. It is not a 'fear', it about an "appetite" that is not satisfied; and I don't mean one that "food" will solve. it is a starved mental appetite that is not satisfied and the mind compensates that void in the consumption of "food". It's about a balance we do not understand yet compensations are happening all the time to create that balance.

Justin;83458 wrote:
Fear that there isn't enough to go around. In America the fear is present and collectively spreading into other countries through the resonance of this collective consciousness.


Yes, but as I said, it is not about fear and it will spread until those appetites are satisfied. It is all about a balance and harmony that is way out of tune.

Justin;83458 wrote:
As people resonate on that vibrational level of energy and thought, that which we give fear to or effort to try to fix actually creates the opposite effects.


That fear you are talking about can only come from others as they "think" it can be controlled, and it can't, not without sacrifice which you rightfully stated in "opposite effects". Take me for instance. When I was 18, I stopped growing up and started growing out, Ha. I felt the condescension from others and did, for years, try to "sacrifice" doing an extraordinary amount of exercise which included bicycling 15 miles per day, restricting my food intake, taking vitamins and such. I lost the weight and felt great, but my appetite was still not satisfied and I could not continue the grueling regimen, and gained the weight back. It was not "natural" for me to engage in such "torture" (ha). Ha, I blame the world and I was right, but little did I realize until this day, that I was. Ha.

Justin;83458 wrote:
Like the 100th monkey syndrome. Science has found that if you take rats in one country and teach them to go through a maze, after the colony of rats or a certain number of rats have gone through the maze and learned the maze, other rats in other countries vibrating on the same or similar level of consciousness are also able to easily go through the maze. The 100th number or thereabouts represents the critical point of graduation for a thought to vibrate throughout the entire world.


When I read this my mind started again putting the pieces of the puzzle together, and thank you, for it ties up a loose end for me. What you are saying in "vibrating" is a universal resonance, trying to "balance" itself which can be equated with those "natural disasters" that occur in the world. To achieve a balance, we could have prevented if we just knew better. In other words, those who are exercising are exercising to "keep me healthy". It is a universal consciousness at work here far beyond our understanding. As far as I know, it could be that strenuous regimen that gave me the heart condition I have?

Justin;83458 wrote:
Likewise with obesity, America is an obese country and it's spreading throughout the population not necessarily due to what we eat but the vibratory level of our thinking or imagining. Collectively it's spreading and collectively it's gaining in strength and collectively it effects not just the community but the entire world.


God, there is so much I could say here. You are "right on the mark"! Big time and it clearly identifes and gives reason to the eniquity in the world and it does effect us all; every single one of us.

Justin;83458 wrote:
I don't believe at all it's due to what we eat because what we eat is not what we are, what we think is what we are.


Absolutely, but there is nothing we can do about it and the more we try to "consciously" compensate the more out of balance we all become. Balance is eveything and if one is balance, we all are and will do what is universally necessary to attain that balance, "unconsciously" until that imbalance gets to the point of us "falling over", so to speak. Not good.


Justin;83458 wrote:
So the solution to the problem lies much deeper than changing ones diet or putting regulations on food consumption or anything else. Obesity IMHO is a state of mind that is growing in strength and numbers and reinforcing itself with those who resonate on the vibratory level of fear and lack.


Well said! Once we effort to achieve balance those "fears and lack' you call will go too AND my list. It's not just about obesity; it about everything that has ever plagued us.

Thanks so much for your post, :bigsmile:

William
0 Replies
 
 

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