9
   

It's customary.....

 
 
2PacksAday
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Mar, 2010 12:07 am
@roger,
A few years ago, generally, would have been my number one choice, but I used the word so much that I started to annoy myself....same with actually. What made me notice this was when my son started speaking, he was being a little magpie...mimicking my speech patterns and choice of words.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Mar, 2010 12:33 am
@2PacksAday,
Un huh. I knew someone who couldn't end a sentence without adding 'ya know what I mean?'. I finally had to ask him if there was some secret meaning in there. If you know what I mean.
0 Replies
 
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Mar, 2010 05:26 am
@2PacksAday,
Yes this happened to me too! I didn't know how much I used "actually" and "basically" until my daughter started doing it.

(Love the baby face line.)


I don't think I'd use "customary" in everyday speech, might use it in writing. It sounds a little high-falutin' to my midwestern self (though that doesn't seem to be the southern usage).
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Mar, 2010 05:33 am
@boomerang,
boomerang wrote:
Do you use the word "customary" for when your describing something that is a custom
or is this mostly a American South word?

I know it's a real word but I'm wondering about usage.

If you don't use "customary" what do you say? "As is the custom"? "Typical"?

Just curious!
As a New Yorker, that word is in my vocabulary for regular n unlimited use.
It is in nation-wide use.





David
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Mar, 2010 05:34 am
@boomerang,
i'll say, "look buster, that's how we do things 'round these parts"

in a historical context, well, i never speak of the past, tomorrow is another day, as i prefer to say
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Mar, 2010 05:36 am
@djjd62,
djjd62 wrote:
i'll say, "look buster, that's how we do things 'round these parts"

in a historical context, well, i never speak of the past, tomorrow is another day, as i prefer to say
U Canadians have been accused of being POLITE.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Mar, 2010 05:45 am
@2PacksAday,
I noticed things like that years ago when i would be editing the writing of others, and occasionally my own writing. You tend to notice if you're overworking a word. I had forgotten about it for years, until i started posting online, when i again began to notice the tendency to repeat a word.
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  2  
Reply Tue 23 Mar, 2010 08:01 am

You could relate it to time, as

usually, normally: current and daily happening

customarily: less frequently, and stretching further back (decades, say)

traditionally: dating back maybe centuries.

historically: origin lost in the mists of time, and maybe is not happening now.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Mar, 2010 12:12 pm
Hmmm.... interesting.

I guess I use it in a different sense - there is more of a politeness involved:

It's customary to shake hands when someone offers their hand to you.

Or, as the dictionary defines "custom" as "habitual practice":

It's customary to paint your porch ceiling blue.

Ooops gotta run.... I'll be back.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Mar, 2010 12:30 pm
@boomerang,
U and MacArthur
0 Replies
 
 

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