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The surprising artifacts of King George

 
 
tintin
 
Reply Wed 10 Feb, 2010 09:58 pm
Please look at this...

The surprising artifacts of King George III, ruler of England for over thirty years, revealed that this most loyal and faithful of leaders was a man tempted by personal and political weaknesses, offers from other corrupt leaders, and promises of indulgences from the church.

whats the meaning of 'artifacts' here ? ...I knew 'artifacts' are antique objects ...this seems does not fit here.

what is 'promises of indulgences' of church ? can you please explain a bit. what kind of promises ? what indulgences ? just want to know the details .

Thanks for your time
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dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Feb, 2010 12:42 am
Quote:
whats the meaning of 'artifacts' here ? ...I knew 'artifacts' are antique objects ...this seems does not fit here.

URL: http://able2know.org/topic/141242-1

probably a reference to documents and letters.


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dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Feb, 2010 12:55 am
Quote:
what is 'promises of indulgences' of church


The church was a very powerfull influence at this time. The church could provide support for the monarch plans and ideas and possibly wars.

'Indulgences" may have been promises of political support or possibly monetary support, introductions to monarchs and or nobles from other countries.
This may have been manifested by having a high ranking church official(s) living within easy reach of the palace. Somewhat similar to todays ambassadors and diplomats. Local priests may have been instructed to extoll the virtues of the monarch from the pulpit.
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dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Feb, 2010 01:47 am
@tintin,
Quote:
ar·ti·fact also ar·te·fact (ärt-fkt)
n.
1. An object produced or shaped by human craft, especially a tool, weapon, or ornament of archaeological or historical interest.
2. Something viewed as a product of human conception or agency rather than an inherent element: "The very act of looking at a naked model was an artifact of male supremacy" (Philip Weiss).



In this context it may well mean papers.



Church indulgences beats me, a bit.

The Roman Catholic church, in historical times (see causes of reformation) made money by selling Indulgences, which were little bits of paper promising time off from one's time in Purgatory for oneself, or loved ones who had die4d.

This practice was roundly condemned as fraudulent and wicked by critics such as Martin Luther.


I have never heard of such a practice in the Church of England, of which George III as king was the head.


I can only imagine Church leaders told him he was a great fella, and god would forgive him, and such, in order to earn favours from him?
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Feb, 2010 07:21 am
As Dlowan points out, the King of England is the head of the Church of England--there really is no indulgence for church leaders to have offered to him. I suspect that that particular part of the sentence is evidence that the author didn't know what he or she was talking about.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Feb, 2010 07:55 am
@Setanta,
Indulgence granted by the Spiritual Head of the CHurch can be granted to the King /Queen, who , as reigning monarch is the "Supreme Governor" of the Church, I see no problem at granting spiritual indulgences to the King from his handpicked "God Squad".

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tintin
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Feb, 2010 09:19 am
Thanks for the response.

please note the text this most loyal and faithful of leaders was a man tempted by personal and political weaknesses

'personal and political weaknesses'?

I'm surprised , how come a king be tempted by personal and political weaknesses! what kind of personal weaknesses they could refer refer ...example ? what kind political weaknesses .....example? if you have any information please share . I appreciate for the information.

Thanks a lot.
engineer
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Feb, 2010 10:23 am
@tintin,
A personal weakness would be one against the morals of the day. If he was suseptible to adultry for example. A political weakness could be a tendency to put himself into situations where he could lose political clout. Taking bribes would be a political weakness. So would showing extreme anger to his political opponents. Note that by the time of George III, the king was not all powerful in England.
tintin
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Feb, 2010 11:07 am
@engineer,
feeling better.
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Bi-Polar Bear
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Feb, 2010 05:51 pm
when I first saw this I thought maybe a white house maid found a box of crayons unders gwb's old bed.
0 Replies
 
 

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