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gone into their marital age?

 
 
Reply Tue 22 Dec, 2009 07:55 pm
As the first batch of China’s only children has been in their twenties, a lot of them have married or have their children.

I want to express the above sentence in a concise way, so I figure out “The first batch of China’s only children has gone into their marital age.” But I searched the Google in Britain and got no result of “gone into their marital age” or “gone into their marriage age”. I have thought over the expression for a long time, can you do me a favor and tell me how to say it?

Thank you very much.
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Type: Question • Score: 0 • Views: 649 • Replies: 8
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boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Dec, 2009 07:59 pm
The first batch of China’s only children have reached the age where they can marry.

jinmin1988
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Dec, 2009 08:03 pm
@boomerang,
Thang you, boomerang.
But why it is where they can marry, not when they can marry.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Dec, 2009 08:29 pm
@jinmin1988,
I would refer to it as "being of marriageable age".

Now that "x / x group" is of marriageable age.

wiki offers

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marriageable_age

0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Dec, 2009 10:27 pm
@jinmin1988,
As the first batch of China’s offspring from the "one-child only" policy has reached [their twenties] a marriageable age, a lot of them have married [or?] and have their own [children] child.

Many of the first batch of China’s offspring from the "one-child only" policy has reached an where they can marry with the result that a lot of them have married [or?] and have their own [children] child.
jinmin1988
 
  1  
Reply Wed 23 Dec, 2009 05:38 am
@JTT,
Quote:
Many of the first batch of China’s offspring from the "one-child only" policy has reached an where they can marry with the result that a lot of them have married [or?] and have their own [children] child.


What is it?
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Wed 23 Dec, 2009 11:37 am
@jinmin1988,
Sorry, Jinmin, I forgot a word.

Many of the first batch of China’s offspring from the "one-child only" policy has reached an age where they can marry with the result that a lot of them have married [or?] and have their own [children] child.
jinmin1988
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Dec, 2009 12:54 am
@JTT,
Thank you, JTT. That makes sense now, but I still feel it's too long.

why you add this?
Quote:
with the result that a lot of them have married [or?] and have their own [children] child.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Dec, 2009 08:54 am
@jinmin1988,
jinmin1988 wrote:

As the first batch of China’s only children has been in their twenties, a lot of them have married or have their children.

I want to express the above sentence in a concise way, so I figure out “The first batch of China’s only children has gone into their marital age.” But I searched the Google in Britain and got no result of “gone into their marital age” or “gone into their marriage age”. I have thought over the expression for a long time, can you do me a favor and tell me how to say it?



As the first generation resulting from China's One Child program has entered their twenties, they have begun to marry and have their own children.

~~~

I'm not sure you can get the message across in a more "concise" way.
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