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Possibly moving to FL. How big are the bugs really?

 
 
Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Nov, 2009 08:50 pm
@mm25075,
Grubs like lawn, but most really nasty bugs like human garbage, rotting flesh or dark, damp rotting places. Just keep your house clean and dry and remember to dispose of dead things and most insects will probably leave you alone.
BorisKitten
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Nov, 2009 09:23 pm
@Green Witch,
Er, I believe the entire state of Florida is a damp rotting place for, like, 6 months of every year...
0 Replies
 
BorisKitten
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Nov, 2009 09:33 pm
@mm25075,
Quote:
ACK so if I get too close to a pond, lake, or other large body of water there might actually be a reptile that comes out and wants to bite my foot?"

And what about those jellyfish?...this beach goer wants to get her feet wet sometimes.

Well, let's see here... it's VERRA unlikely an alligator will want to bite your foot, esp if you do, like me, spend a moment stamping and perhaps making loud noises as you approach.

Said 'gator might want to bite your Pet's Foot, however, being much smaller and not, you know, stamping about as we do.

I've had much less trouble on the shores of large freshwater bits than small ones; however large freshwater bits may have gators farther out... I've never worried at all about salt-water in FL, though frankly it's been a long time since I've inhabited such (salt) water.

S of Orlando you'll be as far from saltwater as you can get in this state. Many years ago in South Florida, we had the occasional saltwater jellyfish/man 'o wars, horseshoe crabs, and stingrays....

er, never mind. Are you moving here yet? It's, like, a virtual paradise!
0 Replies
 
BorisKitten
 
  2  
Reply Sun 8 Nov, 2009 09:36 pm
@mm25075,
Quote:
Are there particular plants that certain kinds of bugs are attracted to?

Why, sure! Lantana and Butterfly Weed will attract tons of butterflies practically all year 'round, and once you plant either one, they'll come back every year all by themselves.
0 Replies
 
BorisKitten
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Nov, 2009 10:00 pm
Yard Photos, to make up for all those yucky bugs!
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2716/4088622736_c637131f58.jpg
Peach blossoms, from, ya know, our Peach Tree.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2653/4088621876_ddc30eacdb.jpg
Passionflower vines... growing wild by the pond every summer.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2799/4087862429_9f7d1cafb6.jpg
Lantana flower, also grows wild in the yard.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2783/4088620594_b28b0228a0.jpg
Fall leaves, in case you thought we didn't have them here... mostly Sweet Gum, some Chinese Tallow too.
mm25075
 
  2  
Reply Sun 8 Nov, 2009 11:16 pm
@BorisKitten,
oh color! I remember what thats like! You mean everything isn't beige? or ..navajo beige, or peach beige, or..umm sand beige?
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Nov, 2009 07:30 am
@BorisKitten,
Thanks for identifying the passion vine. My neighbor brought a plant from California and now it covers our communal fence. It is gorgeous, and every summer a certain type of butterfly, orange and small, flits over the vine in the hundreds.
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Nov, 2009 07:31 am
@Green Witch,
Quote:
Just keep your house clean and dry and remember to dispose of dead things and most insects will probably leave you alone.

The eleventh commandment...and very effective.
mm25075
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Nov, 2009 08:49 pm
@panzade,
panzade wrote:

Quote:
Just keep your house clean and dry

Hahahahahha. With my cats? Hahaha . K.

Add to list: Hire a cleaning crew to come in weekly
BorisKitten
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 Nov, 2009 06:31 pm
@panzade,
Quote:
Thanks for identifying the passion vine.

Passionflower is a well-known herb, used to calm folks with anxiety and to treat insomnia. I think all parts of the plant are used, brewed as a nice tea. Best part is, it grows wild in FL! Once established it comes back every year with no effort, and spreads (around here) like mad.

Quote:
Uses and Medicinal Properties
From www.allnature.com:

Passionflower is edible and medicinal. edible, The delicious fruit and flowers can be eaten raw or cooked in jellies, jams, young leaves are used as a cooked vegetable or eaten in salads. There is scientific evidence of the medicinal constituents of this herb. Recent studies have pointed to the flavonoids in passion flower as the primary constituents responsible for its relaxing and antianxiety effects. Some of the plants constituents, Apigenin, Luteolin, Kaempferol, and Quercetin, are being studied and showing promise in fighting Parkinson's Disease, Cancer, HIV, Leukemia, and more. The leaves and stems are medicinal used as antispasmodic, astringent, diaphoretic, hypnotic, narcotic, sedative, vasodilator and are also used in the treatment of women's complaints. Passionflower is used as an alternative medicine in the treatment of insomnia, nervous tension, irritability, neuralgia, irritable bowel syndrome, premenstrual tension and vaginal discharges. An infusion of the plant depresses the motor nerves of the spinal cord, making it very valuable in the treatment of back pain. The infusion is also sedative, slightly reduces blood pressure and increases respiratory rate. The herb contains alkaloids and flavonoids that are an effective non-addictive sedative that does not cause drowsiness. It is of great service in epilepsy. The plant is not recommended for use during pregnancy. The dried herb is much exported from America to Europe for use as an alternative medicine.
0 Replies
 
BorisKitten
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 Nov, 2009 06:33 pm
@mm25075,
Quote:
panzade wrote:
Quote:
Just keep your house clean and dry
Hahahahahha. With my cats? Hahaha . K.

Clean with 3 dogs and 3 cats? Dry in FL with the windows open all year long? Oh, sure, "Just keep... clean and dry..."

Does furry and damp count?
0 Replies
 
 

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