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Possibly moving to FL. How big are the bugs really?

 
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Nov, 2009 01:20 pm
@Phoenix32890,
Quote:
crocs will chase you


Sounds like either way I'm not going to bother trying to find out which one is which if I spy one 20 or so feet away from me. Not going to wait around to see if I can distinguish their snout.... Laughing
Phoenix32890
 
  2  
Reply Sat 7 Nov, 2009 01:28 pm
@tsarstepan,
The American Crocodile has a very small population, and is mostly in the southernmost part of Florida.

One day I was in the Everglades. There was a cement path that was only for walkers. All of a sudden I saw, lying across the path, what looked like the outside of a recapped truck tire that had fallen off the tire. I wondered what it was doing there.

I went closer, and the tire tread moved! Shocked

In my community, there are a number of small ponds. Each has its resident gator. If you go out at night, you will sometimes see the gator walking from one pond to another.
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Nov, 2009 01:36 pm
@Phoenix32890,
So when I visit my sister in Cape Coral, Florida (she lives next to one of the boating canals) I shouldn't worry about crocs?
Phoenix32890
 
  2  
Reply Sat 7 Nov, 2009 01:42 pm
@tsarstepan,
tsarstepan wrote:

So when I visit my sister in Cape Coral, Florida (she lives next to one of the boating canals) I shouldn't worry about crocs?


Quote:
American crocodiles are found in the souther tip of Florida, including the Florida Keys. They are also found in Central and South America and the West Indies, including Belize, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Venezuela, Peru, Panama, Mexico, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Martinique, Margarita, Dominican Republic, Haiti, Cuba, Honduras, Hispaniola, Jamaica, and Trinidad.


http://www.angelfire.com/mo2/animals1/crocodile/amercroc.html

Feel better now? The only thing that I would suggest is that if you have a tiny dog, (or a toddler), don't leave them alone near a body of water that has alligators. There have been cases of 'gators going after little puppies.
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Nov, 2009 01:44 pm
@Phoenix32890,
<<PHEW>> Wink

My sister does worry about her 2 shitzu's and she periodically snaps photos of the gators in the canal and emails me them.

Thanks for the reasoned voice! Smile
Phoenix32890
 
  2  
Reply Sat 7 Nov, 2009 01:57 pm
@tsarstepan,
Aha! A canal. I think that would be a lot less dangerous than a pond. They are less likely to move out of a canal, than a pond which is level with the land. Many of my friends who live on a pond have told of 'gators sunning themselves in front of their lanais!
BorisKitten
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Nov, 2009 02:53 pm
@Phoenix32890,
Quote:
Many of my friends who live on a pond have told of 'gators sunning themselves in front of their lanais!

And they do! We ain't got no fancy lanai, just a double-wide trailer and 2.5 acres. Cross-pond neighbors often tell us of large Gators sunning themselves in our yard.

And you're SO right, Phoenix, about our FL law prohibiting the feeding of alligators: A wise law if I ever heard one!

A wild Alligator will submerge almost as soon as you can spot it. One it's been fed, however, it will approach you, more likely your pet, for a nice snack.

When we take our dogs out near any water, I shout and stamp my feet to scare away any Alligators before the dogs are allowed near the water.

Once I met that one aggressive gator, I became quite a bit more cautious with them! You certainly can't tell whether an alligator has been fed by viewing it from a distance.

Oh, and don't even get me started on the Pythons, released from pet-hood and now breeding in the wild, here in FL...
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Nov, 2009 02:58 pm
@BorisKitten,
Oh Yeah! kitten

http://www.csmonitor.com/2009/0915/csmimg/ASUPERSNAKE_P1.jpg

Hybrid man-eating pythons?

Florida is on alert.

Scientists worry that two species of nonnative pythons now near the Everglades could breed, yielding more aggressive offspring.


this is a great thread...but I'm worried that mm will cancel her plans to move here. Very Happy
BorisKitten
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Nov, 2009 03:03 pm
But honestly, sweet mm, let's be straight here: I've lived in FL for almost 40 years now, and I L O V E it here.

OMG, the wildlife! The LIFE! The beauty! The diversity!

The desert will seem, um, empty of life if you ever visit/move here. It's my favorite place EVER!

We've also seen, in our yard: Deer, Otter, Herons, Egrets, Wild Turkeys, Quails, stray horses & cows, 3 types of Woodpeckers, Turtles laying their eggs, Raccoons, Armadillos, 'Possums, Frogs, Bluebirds, Finches, Hummingbirds en masse... well, hundreds of critters and plants and LIFE, all year 'round.

And 'member, I'm much more rural than you plan to be! You're unlikely to have any yucky/scary critter encounters near Orlando, except for, let's be honest, those pesky roaches/palmetto bugs, which are everywhere, and maybe some red ants.
0 Replies
 
BorisKitten
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Nov, 2009 03:09 pm
@panzade,
Quote:
this is a great thread...but I'm worried that mm will cancel her plans to move here. Very Happy

Me too!

mm, this was a PET python, I swear! Not wild!

I've always had cats and kittens here, and not ONE of them in all these years has ever been threatened or injured by native thingies. Evar, I swear!

They've all died of old age, even though they almost all were allowed outdoors.
mm25075
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Nov, 2009 11:11 am
@BorisKitten,
BorisKitten wrote:

Quote:
this is a great thread...but I'm worried that mm will cancel her plans to move here.

Me too!

mm, this was a PET python, I swear! Not wild!

I've always had cats and kittens here, and not ONE of them in all these years has ever been threatened or injured by native thingies. Evar, I swear!

They've all died of old age, even though they almost all were allowed outdoors.


good to hear about the kitties being safe. I have a feeling they will stare in shock at the size of the bugs though.

Ok looks like I'm gonna have to hire a bug killer for my house though. I have this HUGE fear a that any bug I go to smash with a shoe, just will not die and will actually crawl onto the shoe and come after me. *shudder* I've always been a catch and release kinda bug catcher. DO.NOT.LIKE.CLEANING.DEAD.BUG.GUTS. EEEEEWWWWWWW!

red on yellow...gonna have to remember that. I have seen the black on yellow fellas here occasionally but never the red on yellow kind.
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Nov, 2009 11:43 am
@mm25075,
I'm gonna spend a little time today mm, to give you some money saving tips on pest control in Florida.

I've lived here for 30 years and I save a lot of money with the help of the drummer in my band who has his own pest control business and is full of great advice.
mm25075
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Nov, 2009 11:54 am
@panzade,
Woot! Thank ya panzade!
0 Replies
 
BorisKitten
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Nov, 2009 12:28 pm
@panzade,
Quote:
... pest control in Florida.

Tell us all, please!

I always worry about chemicals & pets. Like Boric Acid is a bit too scary for me, esp given the tiny spaces cats can get into. Ever tried Diatomaceous Earth (sp?).

I worked for a Pest Control service for a couple of years, and all they ever did was blast nasty liquid chemicals all over people's lawns and homes. Yuck!
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Nov, 2009 12:36 pm
@Izzie,
Izzie wrote:
<RogRat - would you pass me a bucket please.... the 8 legged things have just given me the heeby-jeebies and I think I need to throw, you know how I don't do 8 legs.... ACK ACK ACK ACK ACK ACK>

http://johnstodderinexile.files.wordpress.com/2006/09/mars_attacks-alien.jpg
Ack?
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Nov, 2009 12:41 pm
@BorisKitten,
Quote:
I worked for a Pest Control service for a couple of years, and all they ever did was blast nasty liquid chemicals all over people's lawns and homes.


I know. My ex used to pay $500 a year and we had ants, a termite infestation and other horrors...a total waste of money.
BorisKitten
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Nov, 2009 01:30 pm
@panzade,
You're right! I forgot to say, all the monthly spraying did Nothing to kill any bugs!
0 Replies
 
Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Nov, 2009 01:41 pm
The chemicals they use to kill bugs are far more scary and dangerous than the bugs themselves. Most insects have developed an immunity to the poisons used on them because they reproduce so quickly, unlike humans. People who deal with pest control products (including farm workers) have very high rates of illness connected to these poisons. I suggest educating yourself about insects and learn how to naturally keep them at bay. Most show up because you have created an environment they thrive in.
BorisKitten
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Nov, 2009 02:21 pm
@Green Witch,
Quote:
The chemicals they use to kill bugs are far more scary and dangerous than the bugs themselves.

I SO Agree!

Lucky for me, I worked in the (chemical-free) office of this tiny company, and that was many years ago. I've never sprayed anything in our own house or lawn.

I did, however, have to take all those phone calls from customers, all upset because they'd spent so very much money to have chemicals sprayed all over their homes, only to find roaches, fleas, and ants crawling all over the place! I really hated that job.
0 Replies
 
mm25075
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Nov, 2009 08:24 pm
Are there particular plants that certain kinds of bugs are attracted to?

I mean I can stand grasshoppers as long as I don't hear the crunch of them under foot. I won't even go near my garbage can during the day because the bees just love one particular bush. *covers herself in netting*

Ok, seriously again..crocs and aligators, to this desert and beach goer are ...... "ACK so if I get too close to a pond, lake, or other large body of water there might actually be a reptile that comes out and wants to bite my foot?"

And what about those jellyfish?...this beach goer wants to get her feet wet sometimes.
 

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