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ought there be a regulation?

 
 
Reply Fri 28 Aug, 2009 07:20 am
should suspected swine flu victims be disallowed from boarding airplanes?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 8 • Views: 2,706 • Replies: 27
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ebrown p
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Aug, 2009 07:27 am
I think it will help if we make them take off their shoes before boarding.
0 Replies
 
mysteryman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Aug, 2009 07:27 am
@dyslexia,
Thats an interesting question.
I can understand the view of some people that they should, because swine flu is a problem.
But, on the other hand, you would then have to stop anyone with the flu, even the common seasonal flu, from boarding planes.
I read somewhere that more people die every year from the seasonal flu worldwide then have died from swine flu.

Yes, with modern air travel, viruses can be spread around the world in just a few hours and that is a potential problem.

I really dont know the answer, and I really dont think there is a good answer to the question.

And if they are simply "suspected", what legal reason is there to stop them?
And how do you know they are "suspected"?
Is there going to be a "watch list" at every airport worldwide with every persons name on it that MIGHT have the flu?
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Aug, 2009 07:48 am
@dyslexia,
should they?
they are

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/jul/19/swine-flu-british-airways-virgin
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Aug, 2009 05:03 pm
Could there be a legal challenge to this "nasal profiling"?
0 Replies
 
Ceili
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Aug, 2009 09:29 pm
In Japan, they use X-ray machines to take your body temperature. If you have a fever your sent home on the next plane.
I travel a lot. I'm on planes, in hotels and I'm the age people are dying from this strain of the disease. On average 5-600 Canadian die each year from the flu. Mostly elderly or the very young. H151 is killing healthy people and it is only going to get worse.
YES - people should be prohibited from flying when they contagious.
Recycled air. Same freaking air! Why should anyone who is sick trump the health and welfare of so many others. Quarantine yourself. Why are people so selfish. Even with the normal flu, it pisses me off when the martyrs show up to work, coughing and sneezing all over everything... Stay home in bed, read a book, eat soup just don't breathe on me.
This flu may not be a serious blip on your map now, but wait. The predictions and the outcome will blow you away. My mother was a nurse during the last really bad flu in the 50's in London. She said, the nurses took turns, rotating through the sick wards, either in bed or dreading their turn. She has seen pandemics and is warning us of dire consequences and most of us have no idea what it will be like. But, the US government recently sent out a warning, expecting 50% of the country workforce to become ill and has asked it's businesses to prepare for a greatly diminished work force.

By the by... I'm not some freak doomsdayer. Just wanted to clarify. lol




Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Aug, 2009 11:33 am
@Ceili,
Ceili wrote:

...But, the US government recently sent out a warning, expecting 50% of the country workforce to become ill and has asked it's businesses to prepare for a greatly diminished work force.




With the high unemployment, this would be an incentive to start to rehire, and fatten up the employment picture. So, the 50% illness rate, I take with a big grain of salt.
roger
 
  2  
Reply Sun 30 Aug, 2009 02:23 pm
If we let the fear of a virus shut down our transportation system, the virus has won.
Reyn
 
  2  
Reply Sun 30 Aug, 2009 04:21 pm
@dyslexia,
I think just as important, or maybe even more so, is in regards for screening for such diseases such as tuberculosis.

I would think that this could be potentially deadly on airplanes and the recirculated air.
0 Replies
 
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Aug, 2009 04:30 pm
I don't go on airplanes so I don't give a flying **** what they do.
Ceili
 
  1  
Reply Mon 31 Aug, 2009 09:01 am
@Foofie,
Wow, you just don't get it. 50% of the workforce will be sick. This has nothing to do with unemployment. If 50% of trained bus drivers, police, nurses, ambulance drivers, air traffic control. garbage drivers are ill, even on a rotating basis... this could paralyze cities.
But, yeah., I'm sure an unemployed banker will know what to do.....
Ceili
 
  1  
Reply Mon 31 Aug, 2009 09:02 am
@spendius,
nice, class answer from a class ???

Ask Toronto about a disease that flew in for a visit. SARS
Do you honestly think your safe because you don't leave the neighbourhood... good luck to ya.
0 Replies
 
Ceili
 
  1  
Reply Mon 31 Aug, 2009 09:06 am
@roger,
Roger, I honestly think, due diligence will prevent that from happening.
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Mon 31 Aug, 2009 09:46 am
@Ceili,
Ceili wrote:

Wow, you just don't get it. 50% of the workforce will be sick. This has nothing to do with unemployment. If 50% of trained bus drivers, police, nurses, ambulance drivers, air traffic control. garbage drivers are ill, even on a rotating basis... this could paralyze cities.
But, yeah., I'm sure an unemployed banker will know what to do.....


I do not believe it will be 50%! How was that percentage arrived at?
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 31 Aug, 2009 11:17 am
@Ceili,
Ceili wrote:
But, the US government recently sent out a warning, expecting 50% of the country workforce to become ill and has asked it's businesses to prepare for a greatly diminished work force.


I work for a primarily American company. We've just been through the emergency broadcast prep test - so they can call people and tell them not to come in if an office is hit hard. They've got a business group working out strategies to manage the workload.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 31 Aug, 2009 11:18 am
@spendius,
Luckily, the viruses can travel to you, so you don't have to go looking for them.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 31 Aug, 2009 11:22 am
@Foofie,
http://www.cdc.gov/H1N1FLU/

weekly updates at http://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/

from this week's update

Quote:
Synopsis:

During week 33 (August 16-22, 2009), influenza activity remained stable or continued to decline in most areas of the U.S. However, activity appears to be increasing in the Southeast.

A total of 8,843 hospitalizations and 556 deaths associated with 2009 influenza A (H1N1) viruses have been reported to CDC an increase from 7,983 hospitalizations and 522 deaths from the prior week

During week 33:
804 (18.0%) specimens tested by U.S. World Health Organization (WHO) and National Respiratory and Enteric Virus Surveillance System (NREVSS) collaborating laboratories and reported to CDC/Influenza Division were positive for influenza.

99% of all subtyped influenza A viruses being reported to CDC were 2009 influenza A (H1N1) viruses.

The proportion of deaths attributed to pneumonia and influenza (P&I) was below the epidemic threshold.

Five influenza-associated pediatric deaths were reported and all were associated with a 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus infection.

The proportion of outpatient visits for influenza-like illness (ILI) was below the national baseline. Region IV reported ILI above their region-specific baseline.

Two states and Puerto Rico reported geographically widespread influenza activity, 13 states reported regional influenza activity, 10 states and the District of Columbia reported local influenza activity, 24 states reported sporadic influenza activity, one state reported no influenza activity, and Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands did not report.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 31 Aug, 2009 11:24 am
@ehBeth,
also from CDC

Quote:
Geographic Spread of Influenza as Assessed by State and Territorial Epidemiologists:

The influenza activity reported by state and territorial epidemiologists indicates geographic spread of both seasonal influenza and 2009 influenza A (H1N1) viruses and does not measure the severity of influenza activity.

During week 33, the following influenza activity was reported:

Widespread influenza activity was reported by Puerto Rico and two states (Alaska and Georgia).

Regional influenza activity was reported by 13 states (Alabama, California, Florida, Hawaii, Kentucky, Maine, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and South Carolina).


Local influenza activity was reported by the District of Columbia and 10 states (Arizona, Arkansas, Louisiana, Montana, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and Washington).

Sporadic activity was reported by 24 states (Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Utah, Vermont, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming).

No influenza activity was reported by one state (New Hampshire).
Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands did not report.


A description of surveillance methods is available at: http://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/fluactivity.htm

Page last updated August 28, 2009.
Content Source: Coordinating Center for Infectious Diseases (CCID)
National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD)

0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 31 Aug, 2009 11:33 am
mismi lives in one of the regions already being hit. Apparently something like 200 - 300 kids were out from the nearby middle school last week.
0 Replies
 
Ceili
 
  1  
Reply Mon 31 Aug, 2009 11:35 am
They've closed a lot of schools here too, on the island and a lot of the reserves are being hit very hard. Scary.
0 Replies
 
 

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