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Does this sentence make sense?

 
 
Reply Thu 27 Aug, 2009 07:43 am
There will be an upward trend with yearly sales rising from just below 150,000 in 2010 to 400,000 units in 2020, although a slight decrease is predicted to emerge in the year 2013 and 2018.

Can you understand it? Is there any mistake in it?

Thank you.
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Type: Question • Score: 0 • Views: 1,293 • Replies: 11
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rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Thu 27 Aug, 2009 07:48 am
@jinmin1988,
jinmin1988 wrote:

There will be an upward trend with yearly sales rising from just below 150,000 in 2010 to 400,000 units in 2020, although a slight decrease is predicted to emerge in the year 2013 and 2018.

Can you understand it? Is there any mistake in it?

Thank you.

It appears correct and I can understand it. I might include the word "units" after the 150,000 just for consistency in the implied comparison, but I don't think it's a necessity. Also I think the last reference to "year" should be plural because you are suggesting two different years.

For example, There will be an upward trend with yearly sales rising from just below 150,000 units in 2010 to 400,000 units in 2020, although a slight decrease is predicted to emerge in the years 2013 and 2018.
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 27 Aug, 2009 07:49 am
Yes, it is comprehensible. No, i don't see any mistakes in it. Some people might allege that it could be better composed, but i don't think it's that important.
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jinmin1988
 
  1  
Reply Thu 27 Aug, 2009 08:06 am
Thank you for your pelies.
What about "There would be an upward trend ..."
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 27 Aug, 2009 08:32 am
@jinmin1988,
Using "would" completely alters the meaning of the sentence, and makes it an incomplete sentence, as this sentence does not describe the condition necessary to account for the financial performance.
jinmin1988
 
  1  
Reply Thu 27 Aug, 2009 08:51 am
@Setanta,
Is "There would be..." a kind of guess?
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 27 Aug, 2009 09:42 am
@jinmin1988,
"Would" is conditional, it means that an event will only take place if a certain condition is fulfilled. Here's an example:

I would go to the party, if i knew that Beth will be there.

What that means is that i will only attend the party if i know that a condition will be fulfilled--in that example, the condition is that Beth will also attend.

Does that make sense to you?
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Thu 27 Aug, 2009 10:47 am
@jinmin1988,
There will/would be an upward trend with yearly sales rising from just below 150,000 in 2010 to 400,000 units in 2020, although a slight decrease is predicted to emerge in the year 2013 and 2018.

Quote:
Setanta wrote: Using "would" completely alters the meaning of the sentence, and makes it an incomplete sentence, as this sentence does not describe the condition necessary to account for the financial performance.


Using 'would' COULD alter the meaning of the sentence but it doesn't necessarily do so, Jinmin. It also can show what you've suggested, "a kind of guess", a greater doubt on the part of the speaker/writer.

Using 'would' could even be illustrating a deontic [social modal meaning]. By using a modal of greater doubt, would, the speaker/writer could just be showing a greater deference, allowing that his/her ideas are not the be all the end all.

Quote:
Setanta wrote: ... and makes it an incomplete sentence, as this sentence does not describe the condition necessary to account for the financial performance.


Using 'would' does not make it an incomplete sentence. There is no need, NONE whatsoever, for the "condition" to be included in the same sentence.







0 Replies
 
jinmin1988
 
  2  
Reply Thu 27 Aug, 2009 05:14 pm
@Setanta,
Yes
Thank you, Setanta.
0 Replies
 
rexertea
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Aug, 2009 06:08 am
@jinmin1988,
I think it is perfectly right. The only point why you may feel awkward about the sentence is perhaps the writer intends to express the accuracy of the figure.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Aug, 2009 11:56 am
"Would" is conditional, it means that an event will only take place if a certain condition is fulfilled. Here's an example:

Any modal verb can be used to express a conditional. A conditional is a conditional when it's a conditional and when it's not a conditional, it's not.

I would go to the party, if i knew that Beth will/would be there.

For those conditionals that do show greater doubt or contrary to fact,we tend to stay with the modals [would in bold, above] that exhibit a greater degree of "indefiniteness" [that's a mouthful!]

BUT, we don't have to.

Here's an example of will in a conditional.

I will go to the party, if I know that Beth will be there.

What that [with would] means is that i will only attend the party if i know that a condition will be fulfilled--in that example, the condition is that Beth will also attend.

The only difference between a will and a would is that by using would the speaker shows greater doubt OR, and this is important, greater reserve.

What this means is that the speaker could know full well that Beth will be there but for social [deontic] reasons, they choose to use make the statement a more obscure one.
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jadsiasun96
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 May, 2013 10:12 pm
@jinmin1988,
It makes sense, but I would change "an upward trend with" to "an upward trend in". But that's just me. It makes sense either way. Smile
0 Replies
 
 

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