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Some idiots actually think the NFL is wrong for giving Vick a 2nd chance.

 
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Mar, 2011 05:47 pm
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
$20 Million negates the need for any endorsement deals...Vick has to be one very happy man...


Well he surely a lot better off then Wisconsin teachers however he is still likely to remain a few hundreds millions dollars behind what he would had earn if he had not gone into the dogs fighting/abuse business.
0 Replies
 
snood
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Mar, 2011 07:53 pm
This what Mike Tyson said about Vick in a recent interview:

"I don't know why people do what they do. What should we do with Michael Vick? Really, really: Why don't we castrate him? Why don't we do something bad to his children to teach him a lesson? Is that really the answer?" Tyson asked. "Or instead, we can say, 'Hey, you've been given the wrong signals all these years, and you didn't realize you were destroying God's animals.' So we have to change his way of thinking. Not kill him, not assassinate him."

There are probably some of the same people for whom no atonement by Vick would ever suffice, that believe Mick Tyson is pretty much refuse to be discarded also. But I happen to think that Tyson may have sort of a unique perspective on the whole Vick thing. Tyson has been through a series of different existences during his life. From overweight, picked on stuttering kid, to youngest heavyweight champ at 20, to convicted rapist, to drug addled and bankrupt cautionary tale. He may have something useful to say about things like condemnation and redemption. At least as much as some of the brittle bitties casting their judgments so freely about.
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Mar, 2011 08:25 pm
@snood,
Quote:
He may have something useful to say about things like condemnation and redemption. At least as much as some of the brittle bitties casting their judgments so freely about.
maybe..maybe not
Quote:
Boxing legend Mike Tyson's biggest regret in life is refusing to smoke weed with late pal Tupac Shakur before he died.

The former professional fighter struck up a close friendship with the hip-hop star in the early 1990s.

Shakur would often offer marijuana to Tyson, but the sportsman feared boxing officials would find out about his smoking habit if he indulged.

Now the retired world champion regrets not bonding with the rapper over a joint.

Tyson tells the Associated Press, "He always wanted me to smoke weed with him, and I never did it, and I wish I did. That's my biggest regret."

Shakur was gunned down and killed in Las Vegas in 1996 after watching Tyson in a fight.



Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/blogs/dailydish/detail?entry_id=71894#ixzz1FV13pcMX


It could have been raping women, or not moving the cord on the treadmill, or munching on an ear in the ring...but no, his greatest regret is protecting his income by not smoking a doobie with Tubac
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  2  
Reply Wed 2 Mar, 2011 08:26 pm
@snood,
Sorry Snood but I feel no need to forgive or forget the abused/torture of defenseless dogs in the manner Vick did so.
engineer
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Mar, 2011 08:30 pm
@BillRM,
What crimes would you forgive someone for assuming they were repentant?
snood
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Mar, 2011 08:34 pm
@engineer,
It's interesting as hell to me, engineer - they can no more look into Vick's heart than I can, to see if there's true repentance. That's really between Vick and his God. But they take themselves seriously enough to offer their own little eternal condemnation.
BillRM
 
  2  
Reply Wed 2 Mar, 2011 08:46 pm
@snood,
Quote:
But they take themselves seriously enough to offer their own little eternal condemnation.


Well I do not believe in god or hell but I do believe in evil.
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  2  
Reply Wed 2 Mar, 2011 08:54 pm
@engineer,
Quote:
What crimes would you forgive someone for assuming they were repentant?


It is not a matter of forgiving it is a matter of not thinking that anyone who is so sick and evil that they could coldly torture animals to dead in the manner that Vick did is likely to be able to do more then cover up that sickness and that evilness.

This is not a crime of writing a bad check or even stealing property this is a sick and evil deed showing a moral rot in the center of a person very being.
0 Replies
 
gungasnake
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Mar, 2011 09:32 pm
@kickycan,
Philly is wasting Michael Vick's talents running that ordinary pro style offense; they should be running the flex-bone system which the Naval Academy uses. Vick pulling the trigger on that thing would be fearful.
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Aug, 2011 12:28 am
Quote:
The remorse may still be real, but judging from quotes that hit the internet on Wednesday, Vick isn't quite as penitent about what he did. In a story written by Will Leitch of Yahoo! Movies for GQ.com and leaked to Deadspin.com, Vick talked more about the cultural aspect of the dogfighting trade, and how some folks just wouldn't understand where it comes from.
"[The media is] writing as if everyone feels that way and has the same opinions they do. But when I go out in public, it's all positive, so that's obviously not true … You got the family dog and the white picket fence, and you just think that's all there is. Some of us had to grow up in poverty-stricken urban neighborhoods, and we just had to adapt to our environment. I know that it's wrong. But people act like it's some crazy thing they never heard of. They don't know."
As William Burroughs once said about another matter, this is a thin tissue of horse[bleep]. There are obviously thousands and millions of people who have to live in poverty-stricken urban neighborhoods, and a great many of them manage to wake up every day and avoid the temptation to fight, torture, electrocute, and kill dogs.
Incredibly enough, Vick then made himself out to be some kind of innocent victim in the whole sordid episode.
"I think that's accurate," he told Leitch, when asked of some people couldn't possibly understand that part of black culture. "I mean, I was just one of the ones who got exposed, and because of the position I was in, where I was in my life, it went mainstream. A lot of people got out of it after my situation, not because I went to prison but because it was sad for them to see me go through something that was so pointless, that could have been avoided."
Vick then talked about his experience in prison, and the perceptions of him that he thinks are misplaced. "For a while, it was all 'Scold Mike Vick, scold Mike Vick, just talk bad about him, like he's not a person,' " he says. "It's almost as if everyone wanted to hate me. But what have I done to anybody? It was something that happened, and it was people trying to make some money."
Back to the money thing. In January of 2005, Vick signed a $100 million contract with the Atlanta Falcons that guaranteed him a then-record $37 million. The investigation that brought Bad Newz Kennels down and eventually took Vick to prison didn't happen for more than two years from the day he signed that contract. Vick wasn't hurting financially, nor was anybody close to him.
And this may be the most amazing takeaway:
"I miss dogs, man. I always had a family pet, always had a dog growing up. It was almost equivalent to the prison sentence, having something taken away from me for three years. I want a dog just for the sake of my kids, but also me. I miss my companions."
Companions? I'm guessing the dogs didn't see it that way.
The general consensus about Vick is that what he did was horrible, but also that he paid the price. Now only did he lose his freedom for two years, but he lost tens of millions of dollars and had to start over in the NFL. But the unspoken condition was that Vick would never try to publicly excuse and rationalize what he did, and that's what makes these quotes so troubling. This will set his perception back with a lot of people, and we may wind up including the league office in that discussion.


http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/blog/shutdown_corner/post/Vick-on-dogfighting-in-GQ-8216-People-act-lik?urn=nfl-wp5294

Interesting...the league may well have something to say on this....Vick is correct of course but I am not thinking that the NFL cares about that.
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Aug, 2011 04:28 am
@hawkeye10,
Strange that you can have dogs as beloved family pets and yet treat others dogs in such a sick manner.

That is a real disconnect no matter how must he try credit so call black culture for this behavior.

I am trying to picture any kind of mind set that would have me loving my own cats and yet going around the neighborhood torturing stay cats.

0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Aug, 2011 05:09 am
@hawkeye10,
we have a lot of SPanish folks mnoved in around the counties here and they have a "culture" of cock fighting. There was a farm near us (an AMISH FARM) where some guys were using the hay mow as a ring for cock fighting, EVeryone around here knew that it was going on but we didnt do anything about it. The cops raided the AMish guy a few months ago and we were interviewed (our farm is about mile away) and the cops were hassling me about why I dodnt tiurn em in if I knew it was going on.
"I saw that the Spanish guys had cock fighting as part f their heritage and they were pretty festive about the whole thing. (Besides, a wouldnt like to have 50 pissed off Mexican guys atmy door step ).
So I can see Vicks position . He was a resident on an area where dog fighting was a regional business among the gambling set. Dog racing is just as cruel yet we seem to avert our eyes from this "sport" and many people, when in Florida, go to the dog tracks knowing full well how the post racing hounds are treated.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Aug, 2011 05:26 am
@farmerman,
Except that in Vick's case he was a lot more hands-on than just being aware of, condoning and/or simply observing the tradition of this brutal activity. And he was directly responsible for the torture and destruction of the animals as well. He was not just a silent partner.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Aug, 2011 05:33 am
@Ragman,
and he was part of it all from his childhood. So the culture thing is quite believable
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Aug, 2011 06:13 am
@farmerman,
Culture my rear end and he would have to had been brain dead not to know how the society as a whole view such behaviors.

Similar to honor killings culture is no damn excuse.

Second how can you form emotional bonds with your family dogs and yet be able to torture and mistreat other dogs to that degree.

Hell he was not just fighting them but by the reports going out of his damn way to kill some of them in a slow and painful manner.

0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Aug, 2011 06:14 am
@farmerman,
{I know that you're not defending Vick for his heinous (past) crimes, so with that being said:}

... yes, but my point is that this issue's not just about unawareness/awareness of cultural differences. It's far more than that of a white- or upper-income-ruling class issue...or even a blind ethno-centric insensitivity that Vick seemed to be indicating this issue revolves around.

For example, some members of Haitian culture believes in voodoo and various practices that in some cases are even illegal in USA. Should we suspend or condone these customs when they run afoul of the law?
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Thu 18 Aug, 2011 08:05 am
@Ragman,
yes we should , and Michael Vick has paid his debt and is trying to move on.

Do the owners of Florida dog tracks get their hands slapped when they discover one of those piles of dead greyhounds that have been slaughtered because their running days were over?

They should pay their debts to humanity and then be allowed to move on later.

Im glad Vick is Qbacking for da Iggles.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Aug, 2011 08:22 am
@farmerman,
Don't get me started about state of FL and their political trends and pursuit of Greyhound racing industry. This and that whole racing (horsie-racing, too) issue disgusts me.

You betch'ya. Vick (and some of the newly talent added) makes the Iggles highly watchable. I root for Vick despite what he did in his past. He served his time, but let's hope he quiets down about the issue. he can only harm himself by talking about. I think he's still doing his community service as far as raising public awareness, but not positive.

Iggles look good for tops in their division but the Packers are a juggernaut and will be standing in their pathway for a chance at SB.
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Aug, 2011 09:46 am
The comments made by Vick just confirm my opinion of him.

He hasn't learned anything except that he needs to sprinkle a "I know it was wrong" token over his self-centered whining and excuse making.

He just can't appreciate how fortunate he is and shut the hell up. What a moron.

0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Aug, 2011 09:46 am
@Ragman,
Iggles always break our hearts , just like the "PAckman" shooting his dick off in Buffalo, someone on the Iggles squad will do something of a criminal nature and /or some top guy will get wounded badly and well be in the second division all season. Im not expecting great things from our Birds,

Ive been having waay too much phun watching the Phillies. They are lovin their game. They can afford a little comedy when they're that good.

I dont care if the Phillies go to the Wporld Series, theyve been playing some phenomenal ball mostly and are entertaining as hell.
 

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