27
   

Some idiots actually think the NFL is wrong for giving Vick a 2nd chance.

 
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Aug, 2011 03:35 pm
@farmerman,
Farmer Vick is a sick MF and who know what he might do in the future.

He claim he love dogs when they are family pets yet he went out of his way to kill others dogs in slow and cruel manners that was not needed.
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Aug, 2011 04:54 pm
@snood,
The relevance of Tyson defending Vick.

I freely admit that my thinking is nowhere near nuanced enough to appreciate how a convicted rapist thug defending a dog torturing thug represents a perspective we should seriously consider.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Aug, 2011 05:19 pm
@farmerman,
Being a Red Sawx fan, I recall all too well being left at the altar.

Yes, agreed. Somewho, I predict that Iggles will go far this season...but they'll fall short of making it to SB. Packers are very consistant and look they have 'It'.

May my Red Sawx meet your Phillies in de World Serious. I'm aware that I'm biased but I think both teams have shown they have the fighting spirit and a both possess a TALENTED cast of characters worth watching.

Need I say it?...Yankees suck.
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Aug, 2011 05:21 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
That really took me aback when I saw Tyson talking about Vick. Sometimes truth is far stranger than Vick-tion.
0 Replies
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Aug, 2011 06:28 pm
@BillRM,
BillRM wrote:

Farmer Vick is a sick MF and who know what he might do in the future.

He claim he love dogs when they are family pets yet he went out of his way to kill others dogs in slow and cruel manners that was not needed.


I don't disagree. But the truth is that he went to prison and did his time, and now that he's out, he ought to have the right - just like anyone else - to pursue a career and live his life.

Is he more likely to hurt someone in the future? He may be. But it's wrong to pre-judge that he WILL do bad things again in the future.

Cycloptichorn
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Aug, 2011 06:59 pm
@Cycloptichorn,
Quote:
I don't disagree. But the truth is that he went to prison and did his time, and now that he's out, he ought to have the right - just like anyone else - to pursue a career and live his life.
True, but professional sports have long been allowed to put strong limits on individual liberty as a condition of employment, even worse than other employers get away with.
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  0  
Reply Fri 19 Aug, 2011 03:20 am
@Cycloptichorn,
Sorry but we all have a right to our opinions of this man morals and a right to not support his future career.

As far as prejudging him that is my right.

He had a right to try to made a living and I have a right to do everything in my power to legally interfere with those attempts.

I happen to live in a the same area as OJ was living in for a number of years and was aware for example that he had attacked a fellow motorist over a minor accident.

As a result of my knowledge of this man pass behaviors if I had been unlucky enough to get into a traffic accident with this man I would not reacted in the same manner as getting into such an accident with an unknown person because I would place my chances of being assaulted must higher and would react accordingly.
farmerman
 
  3  
Reply Fri 19 Aug, 2011 05:08 am
@BillRM,
Most of the rest of us dont claim to be Nostradamus like you.
Hes a fuckin quarterback, not a priest. hes done time for his crime and I dont understand why he cant get back to his career.
I feel that his leadership skills on the playing field and his raw talent to pass and run and dodge are gifts that hes properly exploiting just like a blacksmith can shoe a horse.
Whether you believe hom or not is immeterial to me (and most football fans as measured from responses in polls).

If your world is free of all splotches and crime good for you. Most of tne rest of us have to live with an annoying reality of human frailties and while we are always disappointed, I dont think that carrying "grudges" doesnt help others cope any better nor deal with reality any better. We have rules about "Apying " for our sins against society. Comparing OJ with Michael Vick is just an attempt at doing the "Hitler did this too" comparison. Much of what has been used in evidence against Vick has been exaggeration and hearsay (The judge admonished the prosecutors for that very thing but the newspapers have carried much of the story as fact and it wasnt). WHether you believe that Vick's culture of dog fighting was a valid assertion or not, is your problem based upon internet data and "truth".
I want the football season to proceed with a good quarterback at the helm.
PS, do you know how many other NFL quarterbacks spent time in jail for violent crimes?
BillRM
 
  0  
Reply Fri 19 Aug, 2011 05:30 am
@farmerman,
Sorry he is a sport/entertainer and I do not care if he is superman on the field of play I will not allow one dime to go into his pocket from me or allow one dime to go to any sport team who had him in their employ and that is my right.

It is also my right to try to convict others to feel the same.

There is no duty to give a pass to this MF because he had served his prison time.

Oh strangely I would also not trust any man who had shown such lack of emotional connection and cruelty to creatures breed for tens of thousands of years to be human companions to be around me or anyone I care for. That included grandchildren and pets and my wife.
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  0  
Reply Fri 19 Aug, 2011 06:03 am
@farmerman,
One other comment comparing Vick to OJ is not out of line as both seems to lack the abilities to form normal emotional connections and both kill in a very cruel manner without feeling a lot of guilt over doing so afterward.

Yes dogs and humans are not the same however because in one case the results was 'just" torture to death dogs and the other results in two butcher humans does not change the fact that both men seems to share this lack of feelings towards other living creatures.
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Sat 20 Aug, 2011 02:44 pm
@farmerman,
What I don't understand is why you care whether or not someone condemns Vick.

He is playing football and making an excellent living doing so.

It can't be that someone who occassionally rants about the evil motivation of 'teabaggers' is simply put off by one person judging another.

Are you concerned that negative vibes will throw Vick off of his game?

Pemerson
 
  1  
Reply Sat 20 Aug, 2011 02:50 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
I don't care what the man does on and off the football field, he still cannot ever have another dog. That is a part of his punishment. I heard on the news yesterday that he's whining about missing having a dog.
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Aug, 2011 08:30 pm
Quote:
At least in spurts last season, Michael Vick played like one of the NFL’s best quarterbacks. Now, he’s going to be paid like one.

Vick agreed to a whopping six-year, $100 million contract with the Eagles on Monday, with $40 million guaranteed. The 31-year-old Vick could now be in Philadelphia through the 2016 season.

He was set to play out this season as the Eagles’ designated franchise player, which would have paid him just shy of $16 million for 2011. Instead, he’ll earn $16.7 million. Vick eased his way back into the NFL in 2009, seeing limited action with the Eagles. He took over as the starter last season, throwing for 3,018 yards in 12 games and rushing for an additional 676.

It’s the latter stat that still makes Vick the dangerous weapon he is. Few players in the NFL, let alone quarterbacks, bring as much athleticism and elusiveness to the table as he does. But it’s also Vick’s propensity for trying to make things happen with his feet that could make this a risky deal.
.
.
.And as much as this contract is a vote of confidence for Vick’s on-field impact from Philadelphia, it’s also the Eagles’ way of saying that they trust Vick off the field as well.

Believe me, Philadelphia would not have thrown this deal Vick’s way if the franchise had even one iota of concern about what he was doing away from the gridiron. You may never want to forgive him for the dogfighting charges — and no one will ever forget that era of Vick’s life — but every step he’s taken in the past two years has paid off.

All that said, though, this is a gamble on the Eagles’ part. Instead of taking it year to year with Vick and holding Kolb as insurance, they’ve decided to put all their chips on the table.

It’s now up to Vick to stay healthy, stay out of trouble and reward that faith

http://nfl.si.com/2011/08/30/michael-vick-eagles-reach-100-million-deal/?hpt=hp_t2

As many predicted all Vick had to do was play well to be forgiven, it is winning that counts at the end of the day.
BillRM
 
  0  
Reply Tue 30 Aug, 2011 02:22 am
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
As many predicted all Vick had to do was play well to be forgiven, it is winning that counts at the end of the day.


An this is good because of what?

It OJ had been still in his playing days it would had been great if he could had sign a mult millions contract after being "clear" of the two murders?
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Fri 2 Sep, 2011 02:56 pm
@Pemerson,
He was, thus proving it is and always has been about Vick for Vick.

0 Replies
 
 

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