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List of smoking triggers

 
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  2  
Reply Thu 6 Aug, 2009 05:48 pm
@spendius,
spendius wrote:

It might have been, looking at it scientifically, that the crazy, lucid dreams were caused by the brain cells being starved of something in tobacco which is not in the patch.


I think it has more to do with the fact that the patch is dripping a stimulant into your blood all night. You normally don't get nicotine whilst sleeping.

Cycloptichorn
0 Replies
 
spendius
 
  2  
Reply Thu 6 Aug, 2009 05:50 pm
@Robert Gentel,
I quit for 4 years. It restores your lungs to pristine condition, I read in a medical journal of repute, and makes them good for another 40 years of 20 a day. So if you have been smoking since you were 10, as I had, you should quit at about 35 and start again at about 40. Anybody should be able to stand a defunct imagination for 4 years. Your friends won't mind if they know it will come to an end.

A quack told me that hand rolled Golden Virginia is healthiest. A solid gold lighter prevents anybody thinking you're hard up.

And it's easy too if you know you are going to start again. The thought of never ever sucking tobacco smoke deep down again is a fate too awful to contemplate.

I think of nicotine patches in like manner as I do methylated spirits. Tax avoidance. There's more to smoke than nicotine.

roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Aug, 2009 10:15 pm
@spendius,
That's really some impressive reasoning. Should have tried it 25 years ago, but too late now.
0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Aug, 2009 10:34 pm
@spendius,
Quote:
There's more to smoke than nicotine


Of course. That's the whole point of this thread, innit?
blackwidow
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Aug, 2009 01:18 pm
@Merry Andrew,
Hi There I'm new to this site and don't want to but in or rock the boat but read a little of this disscussion and would like to comment I stopped back in Jan and touch wood had no cravings or triggers I used Paul McKenna cd But nobdy told me that I would feel like cr** and health wise breathing, weight, energy etc I actually feel worse than when I smoked to the point of thinking was it worth it in any way, what have I gained, Well there is the cash!
0 Replies
 
eoe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Aug, 2009 02:20 pm
If you're feeling worse without the cigarettes then I'd see a doctor if I were you. There's just no dismissing the physical benefits of quitting. Unless you've gained alot of weight and that's now a problem.
blackwidow
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Aug, 2009 02:27 pm
@eoe,
Did see the quack he said thats what happens when you stop all the tar moves and the lungs get bombarded with all type of stuff they were protected from by the tar
eoe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Aug, 2009 02:34 pm
@blackwidow,
It seems odd that you still feel this way after eight months. By now you should really notice how much better you feel. No more smoker's hack or coughing your guts out every morning, no more huffing and puffing your way up a couple flights of stairs, etc.
And if your doc's a quack, find another that isn't.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Aug, 2009 03:47 pm
Not trying to scare anyone, but the last time a person told me they felt worse after quitting smoking, he turned out to have lung cancer.
blackwidow
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Aug, 2009 03:56 pm
@edgarblythe,
Thanks for that I think I need to get that checked out I have already had Breast cancer 10 years ago but still may be a new dr needed
0 Replies
 
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Aug, 2009 04:07 pm
@eoe,
For the weeks immediately after quitting it's normal to feel worse, but you are right in that it isn't normal 8 months out.
0 Replies
 
solipsister
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Aug, 2009 07:14 pm
@Robert Gentel,
every aspect of life is a trigger in the brain of an addict wanting a dopamine/adrenaline hit

i was once dismissive of nancy reagans just say 'NO' advice on drugs

goodness knows what you'll mull up with now

there are a lot of roses to smell

a probability of 1 is the likelihood that the collector of the pot has won the poker hand and that those who eschew all nicotine have a nicotine free bloodstream

dont read this post put the subject on iggy



0 Replies
 
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Aug, 2009 03:27 pm
Last night at a bar/restaurant a lot of folk were smoking, some so close that I could actually see the smoke trails in front of me instead of just smell it.

Together with the beer and food it was a pretty good trigger, first time I've really felt like smoking in a few days.
eoe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Aug, 2009 03:28 pm
You didn't break, did you?
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Aug, 2009 03:30 pm
@Robert Gentel,
Yeah, that's a powerful trigger, Robert. Don't know if I'd be able to handle a beer (especially in a convivial bar) w/o a cig to go with it.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Aug, 2009 03:41 pm
@eoe,
Waiting to hear..



I do remember being in a crowded bar/cafe on Pico in west LA some time after I had quit smoking, and gradually going into an allergy/asthma phenomenon (sneezerama with wheezing undertones) from all the smoke. This from Ms. Smoke Cloud herself. Something must have changed re my reactivity. And the reactivity has lasted all this time though it gradually diminished, and I can control it by either not being by the smoke too long, or getting a bit out of the smoke draft. This is complicated as I age by my being less able to hear the smoker from whatever feet away (waves to some friends).

I still don't hate smoke and cigarettes being around, it's not a repulsion thing.
0 Replies
 
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Aug, 2009 03:51 pm
@eoe,
No, but I wouldn't have cared too much if I did. My goal is to not be addicted to cigarettes, not to never smoke another cigarette (which I'm sure I will do someday).
0 Replies
 
mismi
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Aug, 2009 04:00 pm
Didge said
Quote:
a cigarette and a beer just seemed to go together


I have never been addicted...but I do love to smoke when I drink beer when out with the girls. My husband hates the way it looks and won't let me do it around him. But I do love a good beer and a ciggie. My mother-in-law (who quit smoking many years ago) wishes she could just pick one up and smoke with a beer every once in a while...but she says there's no way she can. She would be addicted immediately.
0 Replies
 
blackwidow
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Aug, 2009 04:49 pm
over here in uk smoking is no longer allowed in pulic places i.e. pubs, clubs, cafe, resturants this helps a little as you dont see or smell you have to stand outside in the street rain or shine if you want to smoke
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Aug, 2009 04:56 pm
@blackwidow,
In the USA it varies from state to state. California, you can't smoke anywhere. But that's not true everywhere. Some states require only that any place that serves the public provide a smoke-free area for those who wish it. A few states don't even haved that requirement.
0 Replies
 
 

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