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punctuation

 
 
Reply Thu 23 Jul, 2009 09:22 pm
The daughter lived in a place where there was a very big courtyard, in which there were many different species of plants and flowers.

Is a comma after 'courtyard' necessary?

Many thanks.
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Type: Question • Score: 2 • Views: 1,345 • Replies: 10
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Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 24 Jul, 2009 02:33 am
@tanguatlay,
No, the comma isn't necessary.
0 Replies
 
MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Fri 24 Jul, 2009 02:34 am
but it doesn't hurt.
tanguatlay
 
  1  
Reply Fri 24 Jul, 2009 05:19 am
@MontereyJack,
Thanks, Jack.

I think it is either needed or not? I stand corrected.
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Mon 27 Jul, 2009 10:18 am
@tanguatlay,
Quote:
Nowadays… A passage peppered with commas " which in the past would have indicated painstaking and authoritative editorial attention " smacks simply of no backbone. People who put in all the commas betray themselves as moral weaklings with empty lives and out-of-date reference books.


-Lynn Truss
MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Mon 27 Jul, 2009 11:08 am
Lynn, Truss, can, stuff, it, up, her, truss; I, like, commas, and, I, will, put, them, in, wherever, I, damned, well, please,,,,,,,,,.
0 Replies
 
Francis
 
  1  
Reply Mon 27 Jul, 2009 11:25 am
@contrex,
Just for the fun of it:

1. THE FATAL COMMA
Czarina Maria Fyodorovna once saved the life of a man by transposing a single comma in a warrant signed by her husband, Alexander III, which exiled a criminal to imprisonment and death in Siberia. On the bottom of the warrant the czar had written: `Pardon impossible, to be sent to Siberia.' The czarina changed the punctuation so that her husband's instructions read: `Pardon, impossible to be sent to Siberia.' The man was set free.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

2. THE BLASPHEMOUS COMMA
In several editions of the King James Bible, Luke 23:32 is changed entirely by the absence of a comma. In the passage that describes the other men crucified with Christ, the erroneous editions read: `And there were also two other malefactors.' Instead of counting Christ as a malefactor, the passage should read: `And there were also two other, malefactors.'


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

3. THE MILLION-DOLLAR COMMA
The US government lost at least a million dollars through the slip of a comma. In the tariff act passed on June 6, 1872, a list of duty-free items included: `Fruit plants, tropical and semitropical'. A government clerk accidentally altered the line to read: `Fruit, plants tropical and semitropical'. Importers successfully contended that the passage, as written, exempted all tropical and semitropical plants from duty fees. This cost the US a fortune until May 9, 1874, when the passage was amended to plug the hole.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Mon 27 Jul, 2009 02:38 pm
@contrex,
Quote:
People who put in all the commas betray themselves as moral weaklings with empty lives ...


Lynn Truss has, with this one sentence, pretty much defined herself as untrustworthy source.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Mon 27 Jul, 2009 02:42 pm
@tanguatlay,
Quote:
I think it is either needed or not? I stand corrected.


Clearly a comma there is a possibility, Ms Tan. I wouldn't use one, [and this is important, vitally so] in the situation my mind envisions but I have to allow that there are other situations.

In the event that I've seen this correctly;
"I stand corrected" means that I've already received the correction and I acknowledge it.

You might mean, "I'm not sure what I've stated is accurate so I'm willing to be corrected".

In the event that I haven't, my apologies, Ms Tan.
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Jul, 2009 01:41 am
@tanguatlay,

It changes the meaning a bit, to my way of thinking.

1. The daughter lived in a place where there was a very big courtyard, in which there were many different species of plants and flowers.

This emphasises the existence of the courtyard

2. The daughter lived in a place where there was a very big courtyard in which there were many different species of plants and flowers.

This emphasises the plants and flowers.
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Jul, 2009 11:03 am
@McTag,
To me the first sentence emphasises that the plants and flowers (along with a courtyard) were in the place where the daughter lived, whereas the second one says that the plants and flowers were in the courtyard. (Aren't flowers plants, by the way?)
0 Replies
 
 

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