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Is the sentence correct?

 
 
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 10:57 am
1. Mr. Gupta, accompanied by his friends, has assembled on the lawn.
2. Mr. Gupta and his friends have assembled on the lawn.

Is sentence 1 correct and has the same meaning as sentence 2?

Many thanks.
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Type: Question • Score: 0 • Views: 2,701 • Replies: 23
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 10:59 am
@tanguatlay,
No, sentence one is not correct. The only meaning which sentence one could have is that Mr. Gupta, having previously been disassembled, assembled himself on the the lawn--a patent impossibility.
tanguatlay
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 11:30 am
@Setanta,
Many thanks, Setanta.
0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 11:45 am
Set is correct. Grammatcally, only the second sentence makes sense.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Jun, 2009 11:25 am
@tanguatlay,
Quote:
1. Mr. Gupta, accompanied by his friends, has assembled on the lawn.
2. Mr. Gupta and his friends have assembled on the lawn.

Is sentence 1 correct and has the same meaning as sentence 2?


I think that this is yet another situation where "correct/not correct" are poor terms to describe what's going on here.

First to your question, Ms Tan.

Quote:
Is sentence 1 correct and has the same meaning as sentence 2?


The verb 'has' does not use subject/verb inversion to mark a question form. What you've done above is create a question that is perfectly understandable,
but it's not natural. That's not the same as correct/incorrect.

Is sentence 1 correct and does it have the same meaning as sentence 2?

========================

So what is inappropriate about # 1. My guess is that it comes as the result of a direct translation. That tells us why it may have happened but that doesn't tell us why it's inappropriate, and it has nothing to do with the literal meaning of 'assemble', meaning "put individual parts together".

?? 1. Mr. Gupta, accompanied by his friends, has assembled on the lawn.??

Is the same sentence used in the simple past, [1a, below], natural English?

1a. Mr. Gupta, accompanied by his friends, assembled on the lawn.


tanguatlay
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Jun, 2009 12:10 pm
@JTT,
JTT wrote:

Quote:

First to your question, Ms Tan.
Quote:
Is sentence 1 correct and has the same meaning as sentence 2?


The verb 'has' does not use subject/verb inversion to mark a question form. What you've done above is create a question that is perfectly understandable,
but it's not natural. That's not the same as correct/incorrect.

Is sentence 1 correct and does it have the same meaning as sentence 2?


1. Thanks for pointing out the above error.
2. Are you saying that the sentence below is acceptable?

1a. Mr. Gupta, accompanied by his friends, assembled on the lawn.
0 Replies
 
MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Jun, 2009 12:18 pm
No, it's not. Mr. Gupta is the subject of the sentence and "accompanierd by his friends" is an auxiliary clause--it is not part of the subject. One person cannot assemble. "Mr. Gupta and his friends assembled on the lawn" would be correct because the subject is Mr. G and friends.
MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Jun, 2009 12:20 pm
You could also say something like "Mr. Gupta assembled his friends on the lawn", tho it does sound a little bit like he's using a bunch of do-it-yourself kits to create friends.
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Jun, 2009 01:42 pm
@MontereyJack,

Monterey Jack is correct.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Jun, 2009 08:51 pm
1a. Mr. Gupta, accompanied by his friends, assembled on the lawn.

1b. Mr. Gupta, along with his friends, assembled on the lawn.

1c. Mr. Gupta, with his friends, assembled on the lawn.
tanguatlay
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Jun, 2009 09:19 pm
@JTT,
JTT wrote:

1a. Mr. Gupta, accompanied by his friends, assembled on the lawn.

1b. Mr. Gupta, along with his friends, assembled on the lawn.

1c. Mr. Gupta, with his friends, assembled on the lawn.
Just to confirm: All the above sentences are acceptable?

Thanks.
spikepipsqueak
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Jun, 2009 10:38 pm
@tanguatlay,
No, because as Monterey-Jack points out, in each case Mr Gupta is the subject of the verb but it takes a number of people to assemble.

"Mr Gupta and his friends assembled on the lawn." would work
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Jun, 2009 11:09 pm
@tanguatlay,

No, they're all wrong.
tanguatlay
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Jun, 2009 01:04 am
@McTag,
Thanks, Spikepipsqueak and McTag.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Jun, 2009 10:03 am
@tanguatlay,
2a. Mr. Gupta, accompanied by his friends, gathered on the lawn.

2b. Mr. Gupta, along with his friends, gathered on the lawn.

2c. Mr. Gupta, with his friends, gathered on the lawn.
George
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Jun, 2009 10:13 am
Anybody seen Mr. Gupta?
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Jun, 2009 10:58 am
@George,
Yeah, he's out on the lawn, George. Got some people with him.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Jun, 2009 11:16 am
@Merry Andrew,
I thought you intended the edited 'go', Merry, sort of a tongue in cheek.
George
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Jun, 2009 11:17 am
@JTT,
Anybody seen Andrew's tongue?
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Jun, 2009 11:19 am
@George,
Not since he pulled it out of his cheek, George. [I was gonna but I decided, "no".]
0 Replies
 
 

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