9
   

BREADMAKERS! Bring me your recipes

 
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Sun 22 Sep, 2013 12:26 am
@ossobuco,
Wow! been 3 years since the last recipe. Thanks for bringing this one osso.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 22 Sep, 2013 03:42 am
@panzade,
Blessed are the cheese makers.
panzade
 
  4  
Reply Sun 22 Sep, 2013 11:59 am
@dlowan,
I could have guessed you'd have a recipe for cheese, rarebit
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 22 Sep, 2013 12:40 pm
P.S.
The descriptions in that Grub Street article about the resurgence of good rye breads make my brain tingle. Good writer.
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 22 Sep, 2013 03:23 pm
@panzade,
I'm Oirish and French, not Welsh!
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 22 Sep, 2013 03:44 pm
@dlowan,
But I'm 1/16 welsh. Send me the rarebit..
panzade
 
  2  
Reply Sun 22 Sep, 2013 05:07 pm
@ossobuco,
Welsh Rarebit

2 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup porter beer
3/4 cup heavy cream
6 ounces (approximately 1 1/2 cups) shredded Cheddar
2 drops hot sauce
4 slices toasted rye bread

Directions

In a medium saucepan over low heat, melt the butter and whisk in the flour. Cook, whisking constantly for 2 to 3 minutes, being careful not to brown the flour. Whisk in mustard, Worcestershire sauce, salt, and pepper until smooth. Add beer and whisk to combine. Pour in cream and whisk until well combined and smooth. Gradually add cheese, stirring constantly, until cheese melts and sauce is smooth; this will take 4 to 5 minutes. Add hot sauce. Pour over toast and serve immediately.



ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 22 Sep, 2013 06:44 pm
@ossobuco,
Two drops of hot sauce cracks me up, but I take it this is true re the recipes from the area.

Thanks, man.

0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Sep, 2013 04:16 am
@panzade,
Kosher SALT? What, in the name of the devil, is kosher SALT?
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Sep, 2013 04:17 am
@panzade,
Wow. That's way more complicated than melted cheese and mustard on toast!
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Sep, 2013 12:08 pm
You REALLY don't know what kosher salt is?.
Oh I forgot. Bunny synagogues are underground.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Sep, 2013 02:57 pm
@panzade,
Tell me what the kosher salt is already! go on, make a mitzvah!
panzade
 
  2  
Reply Mon 23 Sep, 2013 03:14 pm
@dlowan,
Quote:
Kosher salt is comprised of larger and corser grains than table salt. Table salt is a more refined salt with very small grain size. Due to the larger grain size, kosher salt is easier to pinch and measuring with your fingers, which is why it is a favorite for many chefs.


Table salt and kosher salt taste fairly similar to one another. However, table salt has a slightly metallic flavor due to the iodine that is added. Kosher salt, which does not contain any iodine additives, therefore tastes lighter and cleaner than table salt. Kosher salt tends to be less salty overall than table salt.

So all right already! There you have it.
farmerman
 
  3  
Reply Mon 23 Sep, 2013 04:23 pm
@panzade,
kosher salt is also "hollow". It bursts into flavor with less salt actually in the mix. It does it all by big surface area
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Sep, 2013 04:25 pm
@panzade,
Oh...so it's like the salt we put in salt grinders?

Thank you, a good boy you are!
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  2  
Reply Mon 23 Sep, 2013 04:36 pm
@farmerman,
FM has his apron on...and yes that is important, the size of the crystals
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Sep, 2013 04:47 pm
@panzade,
So, then there is the matter of so called sea salt. Whatsa diff? Is that the same as kosher salt without the security of the appelation (some kind of approval)?
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Sep, 2013 04:59 pm
@panzade,
Sea salt? The size of the crystals or the motion in the ocean?

I can't believe I said that!

We get river and salt and salt lake salt here. Murray River salt is pink.

ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Sep, 2013 05:08 pm
@dlowan,
Our grocery store sells sea salt...
Well, the sea salt I remember viewing was from a plane landing at the San Francisco airport. The approach there is now newly famously tricky, involving the jets dipping low and fast over salt flats. Flats? Well, areas of salt in the SF Bay.

River salt? This could get to be like wine regions...
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Sep, 2013 05:58 pm
@ossobuco,
Quote:
some kind of approval


There is no religious approval for Kosher salt. It's just an appellation.
 

Related Topics

 
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 12/07/2019 at 02:43:46