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BREADMAKERS! Bring me your recipes

 
 
realjohnboy
 
  2  
Reply Fri 19 Jun, 2009 06:30 pm
@Butrflynet,
If we read about an explosion at a house in Citrus Heights, we will know that it involved grapes and sourdough starter.
Which reminds me of a story. (Oh, no! Johnboy got loose from his nurses again). My father's dad was a good man. But George was a bit of a dreamer. He always took care of his family as best he could, but he was always reaching for the brass ring. And the merry-go-round would spin about, and he would just miss.
So, as my dad told the story, my granddad got the idea of going into the bottled root beer business. I swear I am not making this up. As was his want in every scheme, he did not start small. Every closet and corner of the house was filled with his product. Up there in northern WI.
Evidently, there was something in the root beer not quite inert and the temperature and/or humidity or the alignment of the stars combined to set them all exploding one night. Noise like firecrackers for hours and root beer froth everywhere.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Jun, 2009 07:08 pm
@realjohnboy,
Butrflynet is living in Albuquerque now... think of the danger to the neighborhood (kidding). Anyway, bfn, I'm a long time Silverton fan, so I'll be interested in your progress. I seem to remember a particularly good dark bread (did it have chocolate, can't remember) with cherries...
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Jun, 2009 08:02 pm
@realjohnboy,
realjohnboy wrote:

If we read about an explosion at a house in Citrus Heights, we will know that it involved grapes and sourdough starter.
Which reminds me of a story. (Oh, no! Johnboy got loose from his nurses again). My father's dad was a good man. But George was a bit of a dreamer. He always took care of his family as best he could, but he was always reaching for the brass ring. And the merry-go-round would spin about, and he would just miss.
So, as my dad told the story, my granddad got the idea of going into the bottled root beer business. I swear I am not making this up. As was his want in every scheme, he did not start small. Every closet and corner of the house was filled with his product. Up there in northern WI.
Evidently, there was something in the root beer not quite inert and the temperature and/or humidity or the alignment of the stars combined to set them all exploding one night. Noise like firecrackers for hours and root beer froth everywhere.


Our kin must have similar boldness in experimentation, fermentation and explosion!

Making homemade rootbeer and the resulting sound effects from exploding bottles is still one of the highlighted memories of my childhood. If I close my eyes I can still taste the flavor of raw rootbeer as we cyphoned the liquid into the bottles.

I can still remember the many bandaids and dares my brother and I goded each other into to see if we could make a trip from the garage to the kitchen without a rootbeer bottle exploding in our hands.
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Jun, 2009 08:08 pm
@ossobuco,
We already had a smaller explosion in the neighborhood from one of my fermentation experiments. Luckily it was limited to the inside of the refrigerator!

I was making batter for the yeast version of Belgium waffles and the recipe I used said it could be safely kept in the refrigerator overnight and used in the morning.

BBB was the first one up in the morning and peeped into the refrigerator and quickly closed it and awaited my awakening and discovery. She said she had a hard time containing her laughter while waiting for me to wake up and walk into the kitchen.

Looking forward to some tasty waffles instead of the frozen ones we'd been eating, I eagerly opened the refrigerator door, and had a Lucy moment. The Belgium waffle batter had literally exploded out of the large bowl it was in and dribbled down three shelves in the refrigerator to pool at the bottom.

It took an hour to get it all cleaned up, but luckily there was still enough batter left in the bowl for a couple of waffles so it wasn't a complete waste.

I learned my lesson though. With a yeast batter that sweet, there is no such thing as safely stored over night.
0 Replies
 
realjohnboy
 
  1  
Reply Sat 20 Jun, 2009 04:05 pm
@Butrflynet,
Butrflynet wrote:

Any time there is a particular type of bread you want to try out in the bread machine, just say so...


Okay, mention has been made of a garlic bread recipe that might go well with a garden salad and spaghetti.
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Sat 20 Jun, 2009 06:39 pm
@realjohnboy,
Great! I've got several possibilities for you from my Breadman manual that I've tried and liked. All these recipes are put into the breadmaker's bowl in the order they appear in the recipe and the machine is set in the basic mode unless otherwise specified. Note that these recipes all call for the light crust setting. I usually make them with the medium crust setting because I like a darker, crunchier crust. I added my personal notes next to the ingredients. I use bulk packaged active dry yeast so if you use the dinky packages, you'll need to convert the measurments for that according to your package equivalency notes.


Tomato Herb Bread

Size of Loaf: 2 pounds

water (80°F/27°C) 3/4 c + 1 TBL
oil 2 TBL
low sodium vegetable juice (80°F/27°C) 1/2 cup
salt 1-1/4 tsp
sugar 2 TBL
dry milk 2 TBL
cilantro leaves, dried 2 tsp (I use parsley instead)
oregano leaves, dried 1 tsp
garlic powder 1 tsp (I've used both powder and fresh grated garlic)
bread flour 4 cups
sun dried tomatoes, snipped, 1/2 cup (I get these from bulkfoods.com)
(unsalted and dried, not packed in oil)
active dry yeast 2 tsp


----------------------------------

Focaccia Bread Dough

Yield 1 loaf

water (80°F/27°C) 1 cup
olive oil 1/3 cup
sugar 2 tsp
salt 1 tsp
bread flour 3 cups
dried Italian seasoning 1 tsp
active dry yeast 1-1/2 tsp

Use Dough Program Mode

Garlic-cheese topping:

olive oil 1/4 cup
dried oregano 1-1/2 tsp
garlic, finely minced 1/4 cup
Parmesan cheese, grated 1/3 cup
salt 1/4 tsp


Greek-style topping:

olive oil 1/4 cup
dried oregano 1-1/2 tsp
onion, thinly sliced 1 cup
feta cheese, crumbled 1/3 cup
black olives, sliced, drained 1/4 cup
salt 1/4 tsp


Method:

1. With oiled hands, evenly press dough into a greased 9-inch x 13-inch pan. Using your fingertips, make indentations in the dough.
2. Cover, let rise in a warm place for 20 minutes or until double in
size. While the dough is rising, select the topping and prepare.
3. In a skillet, heat oil.

For Garlic-cheese topping " stir in oregano and garlic "
immediately remove from heat.

For Greek topping " Stir in oregano and onions " cook
until onions are soft but not brown " approximately 5 minutes.

4. Spoon topping mixture evenly over dough. Sprinkle with
remaining ingredients.
5. Bake at 400°F/205°C for 20 minutes or until done.

--------------------------------

Cheesy Garlic Roll Dough

Yield 24 rolls

egg, room temp. 1 + enough
water (80°F/27°C) to = 1-1/3 cups
oil 3 TBL
sugar 1/2 cup
salt 1-1/2 tsp
bread flour 4-1/2 cups
active dry yeast 2 tsp

Use Dough Program

Topping:

Parmesan cheese, grated 2/3 cup
garlic, finely minced 2 TBL (I usually add a 1/4 tsp of garlic powder also)
butter, melted 1/4 cup

Method:

1. Place on a lightly floured surface. Divide into pieces and shape.
2. Combine cheese and garlic. Dip pieces in melted butter and then in cheese-garlic mixture. Place in greased 9-inch x 13-inch
baking dish. Cover and let rise in a warm place 1 hour or until double in size.
3. Bake at 325°F/163°C for 35-40 minutes or until done.

--------------------------

This is a recipe from James Beard's book, Beard on Bread that I adapted for the bread machine. It comes out alright in the machine but I prefer to use it to mix and knead the dough then bake it free form in an oven. Until I started baking the whole thing in the oven, I usually ended up dividing the dough in half and letting the machine bake one loaf while I free formed and baked the other in the oven because it is too much dough for my machine to handle alone.

Dark Herb Bread

water 1-1/2 cups
olive oil 1/4 cup
sugar 1 TBL
salt 1 TBL
whole wheat flour 3 cups
all-purpose flour 1-1/2 cups
active dry yeast 1 TBL
black pepper, freshly ground 1 tsp
garlic, finely minced 3 cloves
parsley, fresh finely chopped 2 TBL
rosemary, fresh chopped 1 tsp

If baking in an oven, bake at 400F for 20 minutes then at 350 for 30 more minutes.

-----------------------------------

This is from the Breadmachine Cookbook by Donna Rathmell German

Garlic Parmesan Bread

Water 1 cup
Butter 2-1/2 TBL
Honey 1 TBL
Salt 1-1/3 tsp
Garlic powder 1-1/3 tsp
Bread flour 2-1/3 cups
Parmesan cheese, grated 2/3 cup
Nonfat dry milk 2-1/2 TBL
Active dry yeast 2-1/2 tsp

realjohnboy
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 11:49 am
@Butrflynet,
So it is a bit before 2 pm here. I went with you last recipe because I had most all of the stuff. A couple of (I hope) minor substitutions. I will let yall know how it turns out. How about the rest of yall?
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 04:09 pm
@realjohnboy,
you won't believe this....took my belgian waffle maker to my friends farm in Okeechobee and stopped at an all night Wall Mart after the gig to get the ingredients for waffles on Sat morning. Mixed up a double batch...enough for 20 waffles and put it in the fridge...you can guess what happened in the morning when we opened the fridge door....sheesh.
The waffles were great, light , airy and covered in strawberries.
I'll be going to the store soon to get the ingredients for my first home made bread loaf.Stay tuned johnny
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 05:19 pm
@panzade,
I detect a loss of manly kneading..

fractionally kidding. You two might like kneading and it's not that damned hard, can be satisfying, especially with some wet ones where you slap it against your wooden block or whatever counter .... and cleanup is easy with a blade thingy. (I really don't get why anyone avoids the engagement).

You'all work knowledge through the ages through a machine, when real bread isn't that much harder.

I'd rather try the instructions from the guy in NYC who worked up a no knead thing in a good pot with a long time rise - sorry, no link, but he's now pretty famous.


Ok, ok, I get it, you guys have these toys.


dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 05:20 pm
I have a Breadman, I use packaged bread mixes. I'm happy with the results.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 05:26 pm
@dyslexia,
Hi, dys.

Eh.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 05:29 pm
@ossobuco,
I can see why Dys wouldn't want to be whapping dough around, and only wish him to explore recipe opportunity with Bfn, many good ones already.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 05:30 pm
@ossobuco,
(I can tell I'm working up my role as bread devil).
0 Replies
 
realjohnboy
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 05:34 pm
Damn Belgians. You can't trust them. Not that I have ever met one myself, come to think of it.
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 05:43 pm
@ossobuco,
Osso
Quote:
Ok, ok, I get it, you guys have these toys.


It's always about toys...It's a Binford 2000...uhr uhr
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 05:51 pm
@panzade,
Ref lost on me, but I'll just accept it.
Still, I may research that no knead dough thing unless butrfly beats me to it.
Haven't tried it myself, as I like kneading.

Ok, ok, I looked before posting -
Here's the first bit I saw about it, re Jim Lahey and his bread play...
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/08/dining/08mini.html

Much, very much, has been written about this since.
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 06:14 pm
@ossobuco,
osso
Quote:
Ref lost on me, but I'll just accept it.


Tool Time sponsor-Binford

ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 06:17 pm
@panzade,
I'll look at that if you look on my link, panz.

Uh oh, just the link is funny...
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 06:23 pm
@ossobuco,
your link is great osso
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 06:25 pm
@ossobuco,
Ah, your link not to me, the words are blurry, even though I'm open to this stuff being funny. Remember, I'm from around writers. So, I'm savvy and hard of hearing, hard sell.


0 Replies
 
 

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