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BREADMAKERS! Bring me your recipes

 
 
realjohnboy
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Jun, 2009 07:07 pm
@panzade,
panzade wrote:

Here's another question. How good are those pre- measured boxes one finds in the grocery store where all you add is water?


Bad, in my opinion. The glory of fresh bread is the lack of preservatives and the fun of mixing your own ingredients. Good for a "practice" run, perhaps, but bread made with real garlic, real onions is what it is all about. I end up with flour on my clothes and in my hair. That is a lot of the fun.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Jun, 2009 07:08 pm
@realjohnboy,
You sound ready for actual kneading..(I'll never understand bread machines).
Clean up from real bread making is not that hard if you have a scraper. But, carry on, it's all good.
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Jun, 2009 07:15 pm
@realjohnboy,
good answer....I'll stay away from the packaged stuff
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Jun, 2009 07:17 pm
@realjohnboy,
so...you got a recipe that includes real garlic?
realjohnboy
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Jun, 2009 07:50 pm
@panzade,
Yeah. Get through the Basic White and we can move on to other recipes. One thing you must realize though, Pan, is that there are no preservatives in most if any of the recipes. Buy a loaf of Wonder Bread: it is good for a week...or two.
Home-made bread is best if eaten soon after it is produced. It goes down-hill from there pretty quickly.
I have gotten good at a raisin/banana brown bread that I take to the shop. A little spread of cream cheese... Rave reviews on that.
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Jun, 2009 08:35 pm
@realjohnboy,
Quote:
Get through the Basic White and we can move on to other recipes.


Just cause you're in C'ville doesn't mean you have to talk like a professor Very Happy

I'm gonna have to refrigerate the bread since I'm the only one eating it I guess
0 Replies
 
realjohnboy
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Jun, 2009 08:46 pm
And I send yall to bed with a quirky story about bread machines:
A few years ago there was a company called Best Products (not to be confused with Best Buy). A retailer who grew fast nationally but all built on debt, so any misstep would doom them. And they misstepped.
The local store had a going out of business sale. And just inside the front door was a display of 100 identical bread-making machines. 30% off the 1st week and then 40% off the next. And then 50%. They didn't seem to be moving many of them.
I kept running into a middle-aged Chinese woman. We couldn't converse in any common language, but we agreed to wait one more week . We each wanted a bread-making machine.

We met again the next week, and both of us were crestfallen to see the shelf empty. Absolutely empty. Somebody had bought them all or something. The disappointment I saw in her eyes probably mirrored mine.

My employees eventually bought me one. I hope that that lady also got one.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Jun, 2009 08:49 pm
@realjohnboy,
Refrigerating bread, another whole subject..
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Jun, 2009 08:59 pm
@realjohnboy,
great story...now off to bed with ya...
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Jun, 2009 04:48 am
@panzade,
Since you started this thread, I looked and found our bread machine. My wife said that we didnt throw it out. So RJB's raisin bread recipe brought back some memories of a good bread recipe called the "Amish Friendship Bread" As I recall, it didnt have much of a crust (one of the things about the bread machine breads). However the friendship bread was good with jelly and homemade butter. (We did that for a while too).
The friendshi bread waqs really dense and I dont recall why. Not a lot of airholes and if you cut a slice you could use it as a sinker on a fishin line.
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Jun, 2009 05:25 am
@farmerman,
I'll look for a recipe...it sounds good.
In the meantime...went to the home of a 90 year old acquaintance of mine to look up in his attic(he thought there might be a critter up there) and found a brand new breadmaker he had forgotten about. He offered it to me but I declined. Seems like when it rains...it pours.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Jun, 2009 05:29 am
@panzade,
you could use the spare to make adobe bricks
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Jun, 2009 05:34 am
@farmerman,
I had it earmarked for mixing up a batch of stucco...
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Jun, 2009 10:16 am
Any time there is a particular type of bread you want to try out in the bread machine, just say so and I'll type out a recipe for you. I've tried and tested quite a few versions of them from various cookbooks I've collected on bread making.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Jun, 2009 10:42 am
@farmerman,
Most of the Friendship breads are a variant of a sourdough - so they're nice and dense - hold up well to buttah.
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Jun, 2009 01:19 pm
@Butrflynet,
thanks, you are too kind
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Jun, 2009 01:19 pm
@ehBeth,
saw Mike Myers pronounce that word....buttah
0 Replies
 
realjohnboy
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Jun, 2009 05:39 pm
@realjohnboy,
realjohnboy wrote:

My machine is a Breadman. Some of the instructions here might be brand specific. Here is a recipe for Basic White Bread. It is important to have "fresh" ingredients. So when you buy your bread flour, also get a Tupperware-type container to store the unused flour, especially important in humid climates.
Let's make a 1 lb loaf.

1 cup water @ at least 100 degrees
4 teaspoons oil
4 teaspoons sugar
1 teaspoon salt
2-1/4 cups flour
1 tablespoon dry milk
3-1/2 teaspoons Super Rapid Type Yeast

The idea here is for you to get familiar with how the machine works. I can adjust, for example, for how dark the crust is.



Everyone got their ingredients? Let's crank those machines up and "bake bread together" sometime this weekend.
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Jun, 2009 05:52 pm
This weekend I'm starting the process of trying to create my own sourdough starter from scratch using the instructions from Nancy Silverton's book on bread.

She has a step-by-step 14 day process using flour, unwashed organic grapes and water. The yeast cultures come from the grapes. Am hoping I can stand the smell long enough to make it through to success.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Jun, 2009 06:29 pm
@Butrflynet,
A friend of mine did that, and of course always made wonderful breads.
0 Replies
 
 

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