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BREADMAKERS! Bring me your recipes

 
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Oct, 2009 02:57 pm
@ossobuco,
I do but I don't...
Panz probably does.
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Oct, 2009 03:09 pm
@ossobuco,
I can't get the video to play smoothly...it keeps hanging up.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Oct, 2009 03:38 pm
@panzade,
You might try youtube directly... I think that worked for me in a similar situation.
Here's the original article, and there has been at least one follow up, one for pizza and one "no knead bread revisited".
link - http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/08/dining/08mini.html?pagewanted=all
Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Oct, 2009 03:42 pm
If you make your own hot dog rolls you will never want store bought again:

Hot Dog Rolls

1. In a bowl mix 1 cup water, 2 tablespoons butter, 1 egg, 3 1/4 cups flour, 1/4 cup sugar, 1 teaspoon salt, and 1 tablespoon instant yeast. Knead until you have a soft, smooth dough. Scoop up the dough, grease the bowl, return the dough to the bowl, cover with a damp towel, and let rise for 1-3 hours.

2. Divide the dough into 8 pieces, shape into logs, and place on a greased cookie sheet. (Obviously, you can shape the dough into hamburger buns if you wish.) Drape with the same damp towel. Let rise for 40 minutes until "quite puffy." They get quite puffy, so err on the side of petite when you shape your buns.

3. Preheat oven to 375. Bake for 12-15 minutes until golden brown. The recipe says to cool the buns, but I would use them soon. Like, immediately.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Oct, 2009 03:46 pm
@Green Witch,
OK, I'll try that. I despise store hot dog and hamburger rolls.. well, usually. I don't completely hate the bolillo rolls here in new mexico.
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Oct, 2009 03:47 pm
@Green Witch,
thanks...gonna try it
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Mar, 2010 04:13 pm
@ossobuco,
So, lazybones is finally trying out the no knead bread recipe of jim fahey, via mark bittman.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/08/dining/08mini.html?pagewanted=all


Easier than pie so far. Took max ten minutes to get the dough into the fermentation (rise) stage, and that was because I was having a cup of tea at the same time.


If it works, which I'm assuming, next time I'll add a few things, perhaps 1/4 cup buckwheat flour, a few sunflower seeds, and some garlic. I might try the latest bittman recipe adaptation for no knead bread - which is a faster recipe:

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/08/dining/08mini.html?_r=1&scp=7&sq=mark%20bittman%20and%20bread&st=cse



But....

http://bitten.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/12/19/about-that-whole-wheat-brick/
A quote from that -
"Another alternative: A long-fermented whole grain loaf, more akin to Jim Lahey’s original technique. Using the fast recipe from the recent article, reduce the yeast to 1/2 teaspoon and extend the first rise to anywhere between 12 and 24 hours. Then transfer the dough to the pan as described, and let it rise for another couple of hours " or even longer. The resulting loaf has an even more complex flavor and texture."


We'll see how the bread burns or the mop flops.. today is just a first step.

ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Mar, 2010 04:20 pm
@ossobuco,
I wish I had a le creuset dutch oven - that would be perfect. Not to whine, as I have a fine old cast iron dutch oven (oof, it's heavy). I have an old le creuset braiser, but it's a little too small (the recipe calls for a 6 to 8 quart covered pot - cast iron, enamel, Pyrex or ceramic), and, as a braiser, the wrong shape (I think).
Swimpy
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Mar, 2010 05:26 pm
@ossobuco,
Osso, I've been making the bread from "Artisan Bread in 5 Minutes a Day." http://www.amazon.com/Artisan-Bread-Five-Minutes-Revolutionizes/dp/0312362919/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1268522550&sr=8-1

It's also a no knead bread. I baker it in my dutch oven like Lahey does. I also make it with mostly whole wheat flour. I make enough dough for 4 one pound loaves. The ratio is 6.5 cups flour to 3 cups (more or less) water. One and 1/2 tablespoons each of salt and instant yeast. Mix it until its a shaggy mass. Cover and refrigerate. In 24 hours you can start lopping off grapefruit sized balls and baking. You can keep the dough in the fridge for up to a week.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Mar, 2010 05:53 pm
@Swimpy,
You bake them the regular old way, on a stone, a tile, old cast iron frying pan?

I've GOT to get new stone, it's been years now. I'm presently using floor tile samples, not the terra cotta tiles people mention. The composite marble (whatever) stones are expensive as all get out. (I left my last one in the old o'keefe and merritt stove (sniff) for the new owners, not just out of kindness but because it was one more heavy thing to lug).

You bake all four in the dutch oven with cover? You bake them one at a time?

Thinking, if I split the dough up, maybe into three, I could put it in my regular 2 quart le crueset pot..
Swimpy
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Mar, 2010 08:59 pm
@ossobuco,
I bake them one at a time on separate days. You could bake them on a stone. The book recommends that method. You could bake them any way you want really. The method is very flexible. I usually just form the dough into a round shape, but you could do a baguette shape or even put it into a loaf pan. the thing I like about the Dutch oven is that you don't have to put in the pan of boiling water. The wet dough steams itself inside the Dutch oven and the crust gets really nice.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Mar, 2010 09:11 pm
@Swimpy,
Ok, now I'm confused. What pan of boiling water? This has all galumphed past my understanding..

Ok, ok, I'll look at your link. (smiles)
Swimpy
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Mar, 2010 09:16 pm
@ossobuco,
If you want a chewy crust on bread baked on a stone, you have to create steam in the oven. A pan of boiling water in the bottom of the oven is the usual way to accomplish this, but it is not very satisfactory. The bread ovens in commercial bakeries have steam injection ports.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Mar, 2010 09:28 pm
@Swimpy,
'k. That makes sense. But I've liked my breads baked on a stone with, I guess, non optimal crusts, some occasionally fabulous. Never mind the others. Instead of arguing, I'll try it.

After I run through the present tests..
Swimpy
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Mar, 2010 08:53 am
@ossobuco,
The other thing you can do to make steam is use a spray bottle. As soon as you put the bread in the oven spritz a bunch of water into the oven and shut the door quick to keep it in. The do that probably three more times at 5 minute intervals.

Let me know how it turns out, 'k?
0 Replies
 
Swimpy
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Mar, 2010 11:35 am
@ossobuco,
So, osso... did you try it yet? I just made a batch of partial whole wheat bread with walnuts and dried cranberries. Pretty tasty.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Mar, 2010 11:46 am
@Swimpy,
I read the Artisan Bread site recipe and see I'd have more freedom re cooking on a stone or cast iron frying pans, and now I get the water bit (though in my olden bread baking I didn't do that), plus more speedy rise.

But, I'm so danged happy about the Lahey method, I'm going to play with that some more. Love that small amt of yeast very slow rise flavor. The amount of yeast in the 'artisan bread' is closer to my old recipes. (I think, would have to double check).

I will try the quicker rise - not closed pot way though, as I'd like to explore both methods.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Sep, 2013 05:19 pm
@ossobuco,
Sort of bookmarking to help me remember to post on this - I've got a new bread recipe to like - well, it's an old recipe but new to me.

Back in a bit.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Sep, 2013 06:13 pm
@ossobuco,
Ok, I'm back.
I've had some rye flour, two kinds actually, in my cupboard forever. Only made rye bread once a decade ago and that turned out uglyly.
I've been interested, but a lot of the serious rye recipes seem to need a rye starter (levain), and pumpernickel bread seems beyond my capabilities ever, if only regarding the matter of patience.

This time I tried an easy one, and it turns out the recipe was the first one that the King Arthur people posted when they started giving recipes online.
Cutting a long story short, I changed a little but not much and it's probably the best bread I ever made - besides being easy. Rich tasting, delicious, oh, and easy.

The link - http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/russian-rye-bread-rizhsky-khleb-recipe

the recipe:
The following recipe marks King Arthur's very first venture onto the Internet -- we obtained it from a Russian student at Moscow State University, via the 'net, back in late 1995. Since then, we’ve learned its inspiration came from a wonderful book on Russian cooking, “Please to the Table: the Russian Cookbook”, by Anya Von Bremzen.

1 1/4 cups lukewarm water (105°F to 115°F)
2 tablespoons barley malt extract or dark honey
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 1/2 cups medium rye flour or pumpernickel
2 teaspoons salt
1 tablespoon caraway seeds
3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
3 cups King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour

Manual/Mixer Method: Pour the warm water into a mixing bowl and add a teaspoon of the malt extract or honey. Stir in the yeast and rye flour. Let this sponge work for at least 20 minutes, until it's expanded and bubbly.

Add the remaining barley malt extract or honey, the salt, caraway seeds, butter, and enough of the unbleached flour to create a dough that begins to pull away from the sides of the bowl. At this point, cover the dough with a towel or plastic wrap, and let it stand for about 5 minutes.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured or lightly oiled work surface, and knead until it's smooth and elastic, about 10 minutes, adding only enough flour (or oil on your hands and the work surface) to keep the dough from sticking unbearably. (Rye doughs will always be a bit sticky, so resist the urge to keep adding flour to eliminate this inherent stickiness; adding too much flour will make a heavy, dense, dry loaf.) Halfway through, give the dough a rest while you clean out and butter your mixing bowl.

Shape the dough into a ball, place it in the buttered bowl, turning to coat, and cover the bowl with a towel or plastic wrap. Allow the dough to rise for about 1 1/2 hours, or until it's just about doubled in bulk.

Bread Machine Method: Place all of the dough ingredients into the bucket of your bread machine in the order recommended by the manufacturer, program the machine for manual or dough, and press Start. About 10 minutes before the end of the final kneading cycle, examine the dough; it should be smooth (though still sticky), not "gnarly." Adjust the dough's consistency with additional unbleached flour or water, as necessary. Allow the machine to complete its cycle, leaving it in the machine till it's just about doubled in bulk.

Punch the dough down, and divide it in half. Shape each half into an oval, place them on a lightly greased or parchment-lined baking sheet, cover, and let rise for about 30 minutes.

Bake the bread in a preheated 375°F oven for about 45 minutes, or until the crust is dark brown, and the interior temperature of the loaves measures 190°F to 200°F on an instant-read thermometer. Remove the bread from the oven, and cool it on a wire rack. Yield: 2 loaves.



What I did - - - -

I used the honey, the cheapo grocery store kind, not the barley malt extract.
I used active all purpose packet yeast.
I used the near antique bagged Hodgson Mill 100% stone ground rye flour (not the dark rye also in the cupboard waiting for me from Bob's Red Mill).
I learned to put bay leaves in flour bags back in California, but I don't seem to have a problem with flying futsits in flour here in Abq.
I used fennel seeds instead of caraway because that's what I have in my spice drawer.
Oh, and I chopped up about an 1/8 lb of walnuts and added that little pile at the end, after the a/p flour.
I used ordinary (gold medal) all purpose flour. Flour companies may despair.
Added -learning from a comment to the site - started and ended with 2.5 cups of AP flour, and that was perfect, the kneading and rising and then putting the dough into buttered bread pans was .. easy. As someone in the comments section said, it wasn't all that sticky, not like some wet doughs I've dealt with.
Maybe it was related to my choice of rye.

The bread looked a little lame-o when I took it out of the oven. I put a cloth on top and ignored it overnight. Sliced it the next morning, toasted it and added some butter.
Wow.


Adds, Setanta said somewhere that there was something to do to make whole grain grains work best in bread recipes; maybe it was grind them a bit, I'll have to search. Whatever it was it made sense at the time I read it. That might have made the bread rise more - hell, they say look for bubbles, I never saw any, but it did rise . Might have turned out less dense, but I liked the density and chewiness. Or, the density in my bread may be because I didn't have any rapid rise yeast in my yeast packets.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Sep, 2013 06:22 pm
@ossobuco,
More on Rye Bread anew, from Grub Street:

http://www.grubstreet.com/2013/09/new-rye-breads.html
 

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