9
   

BREADMAKERS! Bring me your recipes

 
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 07:43 pm
@panzade,
panzade wrote:

Mixed up a double batch...enough for 20 waffles and put it in the fridge...you can guess what happened in the morning when we opened the fridge door....sheesh.



:::snickers knowingly and with great sympathy:::

panzade
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Jun, 2009 08:43 am
@Butrflynet,
update


made my first loaf of French bread last night. I didn't bake it in the bread maker , I just mixed up the dough and then baked it in the oven.

How should I begin?

Aesthetically the loaf gets an F. It weighs a ton and could be used as a doorstop. The crust looks like the surface of the moon....but, it's not bad.

I think perhaps I need to let it rise a couple more times, maybe this will lighten the consistency.

I bought a guiding bread slicer and it's the best thing since sliced bread

http://i.ebayimg.com/13/!BVD61PwBGk~$(KGrHgoH-DMEjlLluysEBKQnNGFgfQ~~_1.JPG
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Jun, 2009 11:42 am
@panzade,
Is that the one you purchased? I've been looking for one but most of what I see looks very flimsy and won't hold up to much use and washing.

If that's the one you bought, I'd be interested in your assessment of it.
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Jun, 2009 11:56 am
@panzade,
French bread usually requires three risings. Mix it, let it rise for 2 to 3 hours, knock it down and let it rise again, then shape it and let it rise a final time before baking.

You need a very hot, moist oven. Brush the bread loaves with water before putting them in the oven then spray or brush them with more water every 2 minutes for the first 6 minutes of the 25 minute baking time.

To give it a lighter texture you can use some vinegar or lemon juice in the recipe. Substitute 2 tablespoons for an equal amount of water in the recipe. The acid mellows the gluten in the dough. Beer is another good additive that helps give flavor and light texture.

Additional note: This is why I usually restart the bread cycle after it has already gone through one mixing, resting and rising. It gives it that extra needed time for rising and flavor development.
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Jun, 2009 12:08 pm
By the way, here are some King Arthur Flour recipes for you bread machine bakers:



Yeast breads & rolls > Bread-machine breads, baked in machine

Yeast breads & rolls > Bread-machine breads, baked out of machine

And this is a link to all their yeast breads and rolls recipes in general:

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/yeast-breads-and-rolls
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Jun, 2009 12:52 pm
@Butrflynet,
as always...am indebted
0 Replies
 
Swimpy
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Jun, 2009 02:55 pm
@panzade,
Quote:
made my first loaf of French bread last night. I didn't bake it in the bread maker , I just mixed up the dough and then baked it in the oven.

How should I begin?

Aesthetically the loaf gets an F. It weighs a ton and could be used as a doorstop. The crust looks like the surface of the moon....but, it's not bad.

I think perhaps I need to let it rise a couple more times, maybe this will lighten the consistency.


IMHO not baking in the bread machine is key. I do not like the crust that you get from the bread machine baked bread. The other thing is that you need to watch the dough as it is starting to mix. Don't add all of the flour in the beginning. Hold back a half a cup or so. Add a tablespoon at a time while the dough is mixing just until the dough forms a ball and pulls away from the sides of the pan. Better to leave it a little sticky that too dry. You'll get the feel for it after a while.
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Jun, 2009 03:01 pm
I use a "Breadman" machine, I have, so far, only used pre-packaged mixes. I have been deighted with the resuts.
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Jun, 2009 03:04 pm
@Swimpy,
Quote:
IMHO not baking in the bread machine is key.


I sorta figured that out...thanks for the tips.
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Jun, 2009 03:06 pm
@dyslexia,
I like the prepackaged mixes...it's convenient....but I decided to get into the sleeves-rolled-up aspects....a little at a time
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Jun, 2009 04:23 pm
@panzade,
I'm a sleeves rolled up type bread maker.. I don't think it's that hard, unless I'm unusually tired and I like the results, although I'm going to have to do some measurement adapting for altitude here in NM (which I've checked out with some nudging) and I like the good old recipes, especially - y'all know me - the italian hearth breads (just order Carol Fields Italian Baker, preferably used since you'll only get it dirty the first few times you play with one of the many recipes). If I go for anything newish, it'll be to follow some of Jim Lahey's recipes - he's the guy who started the no knead bread fervor a few years ago. Thing is, I like kneading, that's half the fun, especially for some of the 'wet' doughs that call for some slapping of the dough, take that, whap!
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Jun, 2009 04:26 pm
@ossobuco,
yeah...something sensual about kneading dough Laughing
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Jun, 2009 04:38 pm
@ossobuco,
Adds, new books coming out soon, one of them by Leahy:
http://bitten.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/06/25/quick-easy-breads-stay-tuned/

An oldie but goodie was the Tassajara book -
Tassajara Bread Book

and I think Butrflynet is working on Nancy Silverton recipes. I don't know her books, but have followed her baking somewhat, starting with saving her 'how to make starter' LA Times article years ago. I'm sure it's online. I'm particularly interested in her pizza dough explorations.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Jun, 2009 04:42 pm
@ossobuco,
Oh, and Swimp is right about the adding the flour part.
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Jun, 2009 05:14 pm
@Butrflynet,
Mine has the word Pride on it and the slots are alternately colored gray and white but it looks the same.The thing has to be a bit flimsy so you can guide the knife for the thickness you want but I'm happy with it. I just wipe it off and don't put it in the dishwasher.
realjohnboy
 
  1  
Reply Mon 3 Aug, 2009 01:55 pm
@panzade,
B-net: I recall you posting a recipe and tips on French bread using the bread machine for the mixing and kneading but not for baking. Could you put that up again? It might have been a couple of posts. Thanks.
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Mon 3 Aug, 2009 02:18 pm
@realjohnboy,
hey boy...how's C'Ville?
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Mon 3 Aug, 2009 02:20 pm
@realjohnboy,
Not sure if this is what you refer to, but take a look at the first couple of my posts on this page. If you're referring to something else, I'll have to look further back in this thread.
0 Replies
 
realjohnboy
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Aug, 2009 01:41 pm
@Butrflynet,
Butrflynet wrote:

French bread usually requires three risings. Mix it, let it rise for 2 to 3 hours, knock it down and let it rise again, then shape it and let it rise a final time before baking.

You need a very hot, moist oven. Brush the bread loaves with water before putting them in the oven then spray or brush them with more water every 2 minutes for the first 6 minutes of the 25 minute baking time.

To give it a lighter texture you can use some vinegar or lemon juice in the recipe. Substitute 2 tablespoons for an equal amount of water in the recipe. The acid mellows the gluten in the dough. Beer is another good additive that helps give flavor and light texture.

Additional note: This is why I usually restart the bread cycle after it has already gone through one mixing, resting and rising. It gives it that extra needed time for rising and flavor development.

The Dough Cycle instructions for my Breadman say "After the end of the 1st rise, remove the dough, shape and bake in a conventional oven." I am confused by your Additional note above. Are you saying you put it back in the Breadman and go back to Kneading a 2nd and 3rd time?
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Aug, 2009 07:35 pm
@realjohnboy,
Quote:
Are you saying you put it back in the Breadman and go back to Kneading a 2nd and 3rd time?


That's what I did, as per B-net's instructions...I sent it to a second kneading and let it rise twice more and knocked it down...it made a world of difference.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

 
Copyright © 2020 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 01/21/2020 at 09:45:31