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(piece of) diamond jewellery

 
 
Reply Wed 6 May, 2009 08:26 am
Buy any (piece of) diamond jewellery and get 30% of/off the purchase price of a Movado watch.

Is 'piece of' needed? Should I use 'of' or 'off'?

Many thanks.
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Type: Question • Score: 0 • Views: 762 • Replies: 11
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MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 May, 2009 08:44 am
It's JEWELRY, not jewellery. "Piece of" is optional. When you say "30% of", it could conceivably be interpreted as "If you buy a diamond we will give you 30% of the price of a Movado watch as a bonus" (i.e. you don't actually have to buy a watch, we're giving you extra money for buying the diamond). I don't think that's what you have in mind at all. Better say "30% OFF".
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 May, 2009 10:27 am
@MontereyJack,
"Jewelry" is US English spelling, "jewellery" is the correct British English spelling. I understand that Tanguatlay chooses to use BrE spelling and other conventions.

"Piece of diamond jewellery" is a good choice. You should use "off" when referring to discounts.

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MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 May, 2009 11:02 am
weird. I'll accept the spelling, Contrex. I've read a lot of Brit stuff and never seen that, or at least never consciously noted it, but the dictionary does say "chiefly British, variant." Don't you guys resent the almost 30% longer it takes you to write it?
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 May, 2009 12:35 pm
@MontereyJack,
Quote:
Don't you guys resent the almost 30% longer it takes you to write it?


It's worth it if it prevents people thinking we are Americans... They spell it that way in Canada too.

That must be an American dictionary you consulted, because from where I'm sitting, "jewelry" is a "chiefly US variant".
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MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 May, 2009 12:41 pm
"Two great peoples, divided by a common language."--W. Churchill
tanguatlay
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 May, 2009 10:34 pm
@MontereyJack,
This is off-topic.

Did the British teach American English? I have been told that Americans were migrants from the UK. Correct me if I am wrong.

Thanks in advance.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 May, 2009 10:54 pm
@tanguatlay,
Emigrants. Migrants implies we were planning on moving around alot, once we got here. We intended no such thing, nor had we plans to return.
tanguatlay
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 May, 2009 11:41 pm
@roger,
Thanks, Roger.

I would like to know whether the British taught the Americans English.

Many thanks.
0 Replies
 
MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 May, 2009 11:52 pm
Most of the early migrants into the area that became the United States were English or Scotch or Welsh (and later Irish). They spoke English. It's not so much "Did the British teach Americans English". It's rather they were Brits, and they were here, and they spoke. And their kids learned from them. And immigrants from other countries who came learned from what were by then native English speakers. Over the course of time, the varieties of English spoken on either side of the ocean developed local differences in accent, vocabulary, spelling, and to a small degree grammar.
tanguatlay
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 May, 2009 06:19 pm
@MontereyJack,
Thanks to all who have helped me.
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tanguatlay
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 May, 2009 06:20 pm
@MontereyJack,
Thanks, Jack, for the information about Americans.
0 Replies
 
 

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