25
   

Aliens Check Out the Earth

 
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Jan, 2009 06:03 am
@Mr Stillwater,
Quote:
IF YOU ARE ABDUCTED BY ALIENS THE HELMET WILL WORK FOR YOU


This is the next big thing. ALthough the "thought wave helmet" does look somewhat like the liner of an equestrian riding cap.

What if the aliens just wanna talk and learn our recipe for cannolis?
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Jan, 2009 07:22 am
Ever'body knows them space aliens is obsessed with rectal probes . . .
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Jan, 2009 07:33 am
i don't think you should mix cannoli and rectal probes

sounds unsanitary
0 Replies
 
Brandon9000
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Jan, 2009 09:50 am
Slightly more on topic, how much technology would it take to get from another solar system to this one, and how close are we to being able to do something like that ourselves? If an alient space vehicle were to visit us today, what is the minimum technology they would have to have? If they were hostile, is there any chance whatsoever of us resisting?
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Jan, 2009 11:16 am
@Brandon9000,
Well, we know that for ourselves, such a technology would require shielding from cosmic radiation, and some means of mitigating the effects of prolonged weightlessness. That means, in our terms, a hell of a lot of material resources, and/or energy resources. I rather suspect these are things which are going to be significant to just about any form of life. I could be wrong . . . but i doubt it.
Frank Apisa
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Jan, 2009 11:25 am
@Brandon9000,
Quote:
Slightly more on topic, how much technology would it take to get from another solar system to this one, and how close are we to being able to do something like that ourselves? If an alient space vehicle were to visit us today, what is the minimum technology they would have to have? If they were hostile, is there any chance whatsoever of us resisting?

If they were hostile...chances are they'da blown themselves to bits before ever getting the knowledge to travel between star systems.

As for how much technology it would take...well, technology seems to be something that progresses at geometric rates. If the kinds of advances we've seen during the last 100 years is any indication of what could be accomplished during the next 1000 years...most of us wouldn't comprehend the world of 1000 years hence if we could magically be transported to it.

People of 1909 would have a hard time relating to now...people of 1809 would have had less trouble relating to conditions of 1909...people of 1709 would have had almost no trouble relating to conditions of 1809...and people of 1409 would probably have little trouble relating to conditions of 1709.

Considering conditions in 1909 versus now...just imagine what 2109 will think of what exists today.

My guess...interstellar travel is not that far off. Couple hundred years at the outside would not be an unreasonable guess.
0 Replies
 
Brandon9000
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Jan, 2009 01:07 pm
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

Well, we know that for ourselves, such a technology would require shielding from cosmic radiation, and some means of mitigating the effects of prolonged weightlessness. That means, in our terms, a hell of a lot of material resources, and/or energy resources. I rather suspect these are things which are going to be significant to just about any form of life. I could be wrong . . . but i doubt it.

What about the propulsion itself - the ability to get from here to there in reasonable amounts of time. The stars are much further than the moon or even than the other planets in our own solar system?
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Jan, 2009 01:32 pm
@Brandon9000,
Even with automated missions now, we rely on inertial "propulsion." The question would be whether an alien vehicle showed up "manned," and if so, whether or not the crew were awake and functioning throughout the voyage. I can't know of course, but i rather suspect that constant propulsion over interstellar distances would require huge amounts of material resources for the propulsion system. Hydrogen collection for a fusion reactor has been envisioned as a plausible propulsion means, which means much less material storage requirement, but a huge, high maintenance hydrogen collection array.

These problems are the reason that i am so skeptical about the so-called Fermi paradox.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Jan, 2009 01:59 pm
We are all posing answers to interstellar propulsion when I submit that we dont even understand the questions yet.
IF string theory is even in the right domain, we have to become familiarized with multidimensional analysis as something more than just to play with in differential equations. Maybe, interstellar travel reduces down to interdimensional travel. We dont even have a way to provide any evidence for these advanced bits of theoretical physics.
0 Replies
 
Deckland
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Jan, 2009 02:16 pm
62 kids saw this in Zimbabwe.

0 Replies
 
Mr Stillwater
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Jan, 2009 04:52 pm
If we were to rely on 'conventional physics' there could never be interstellar space travel. The distances are too great to overcome by just creating thrust to 'push' a vessel. Right now, it's a three month trip to Mars and that would entail carrying everything needed to support life (food, water, atmosphere).

Yes, you could somehow cause a magic 'hole' in space. However, how you would control the other end to make it appear in a given spot is a little vague. The Universe is mostly (actually entirely) empty - opening a portal to a spot a dozen light years from here would be meaningless. You would still be in space. If you homed in on the nearest gravity-well, you'd appear in the middle of a Sun. And how would you get 'back' to tell everyone you'd done it?
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Jan, 2009 05:00 pm
@Mr Stillwater,
remember topology and dimensional mapping?. I submit that , if we can describe it mathematically, physics will just have to catch up, just like its always done. We are at the cusp of something like dimensional physics and I have no idea what its gonna look like but lets give our species another few hundred years.
Course I could be all wet because if there were temporal dimensions already populated, why havent they visited us also?.
Mr Stillwater
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Jan, 2009 05:20 pm
@farmerman,
Quote:
physics will just have to catch up


The nuts and bolts are just going to defeat us, not the ideas. I can only guess, but the energy required to open and contain such an 'event' would be collossal. In a hundred years from now there still won't be that ability to generate power at that rate. I can guarantee it. We will still be burning coal to make electricity well into the next century - we will still be reliant on fossil fuels to provide vehicular movement for another 50. No one nation would be able to find the cash to construct dozens of reactors or gas-plasma plants to just poke holes in space and time for the heck of it.
Brandon9000
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Jan, 2009 09:16 pm
@Mr Stillwater,
Mr Stillwater wrote:

Quote:
physics will just have to catch up


The nuts and bolts are just going to defeat us, not the ideas. I can only guess, but the energy required to open and contain such an 'event' would be collossal. In a hundred years from now there still won't be that ability to generate power at that rate. I can guarantee it. We will still be burning coal to make electricity well into the next century - we will still be reliant on fossil fuels to provide vehicular movement for another 50. No one nation would be able to find the cash to construct dozens of reactors or gas-plasma plants to just poke holes in space and time for the heck of it.

..if we even knew how.
0 Replies
 
Brandon9000
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Jan, 2009 09:22 pm
Just to put things in perspective, the nearest star system to ours is the Alpha Centauri system. It's 4.3 light years away. That means that light takes 4.3 years to make the trip. The speed of light is 670 million miles per hour. Nothing man has produced thus far has gone faster than 150,000 mph.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Jan, 2009 11:18 pm
@Brandon9000,
We aint never gonna have television!!, said Pope Innocent VIII.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Jan, 2009 08:24 am
@Brandon9000,
A couple of issues arise here, apart from the speed (or, rather, because of it). How much expenditure of resources would be necessary to send even just a few people there, shielded from cosmic radiation, and with a system adequate to prevent serious bone loss from extremely low gravity? What would be the justification (governments are not free to spend as much money as they wish on anything they wish, except in the case of dictatorships)?

It makes more sense to send out automated missions, unless and until a planet suitable for colonization is identified.
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Jan, 2009 10:56 am
@Mr Stillwater,
Quote:
IF YOU ARE ABDUCTED BY ALIENS THE HELMET WILL WORK FOR YOU

Because after crossing the gulf of space, they're stymied by the buckle on a helmet....

Mr. Green
0 Replies
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Jan, 2009 11:01 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

A couple of issues arise here, apart from the speed (or, rather, because of it). How much expenditure of resources would be necessary to send even just a few people there, shielded from cosmic radiation, and with a system adequate to prevent serious bone loss from extremely low gravity? What would be the justification (governments are not free to spend as much money as they wish on anything they wish, except in the case of dictatorships)?

It makes more sense to send out automated missions, unless and until a planet suitable for colonization is identified.


The justification is the survival of our species as a whole. Greater diversification means greater survivability. If we can spread out to have viable colonies in more than one star system, our species can progress past almost any known natural disaster. There literally is no greater goal than this for Humanity as a whole.

We don't need planets to colonize; we can build plenty of stuff on asteroids and space stations with no gravity wells involved. Spin for gravity.

Cycloptichorn
Frank Apisa
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Jan, 2009 11:01 am
We are on a space ship right now...one not only travelling through space...but through time also.

We are adequately shielded from radiation.

We just cannot steer this sucker.

0 Replies
 
 

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