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I put the dog out or I put out the dog?

 
 
Reply Sun 9 Nov, 2008 11:03 am
I put the dog out after he licked his balls and urinated on the coffee table.

I put out the dog after he licked his balls and urinated on the coffee table.



Neither of these actually sound wrong to me. I sort of prefer the first one, but I'm not sure if either one is technically incorrect.

Is there any hard and fast rule on where the preposition should go in phrases like this, or is it open to personal preference?



Bring up the big shovel, not the little one.

Bring the big shovel up, not the little one.


I'm fixin' to beat in this dog's fool head with it.

I'm fixin' to beat this dog's fool head in with it.



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Type: Question • Score: 4 • Views: 2,462 • Replies: 9
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View best answer, chosen by kickycan
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Nov, 2008 11:53 am
@kickycan,
Answering mainly to bump the thread up Wink .

I think both versions are correct and that some usage may fit better in one situation or the other. But, don't trust me, I haven't checked my handy english grammar manuals.

In the last example, the second use sounds "off".
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Nov, 2008 12:02 pm
I'd like to know why you lit the goddamned dog on fire in the first place ! ! !

"Daddy, where is that book you brought up to me to read out of?"

Prepositions are a wonderful thing.
0 Replies
 
Robert Gentel
  Selected Answer
 
  2  
Reply Sun 9 Nov, 2008 12:16 pm
@kickycan,
kickycan wrote:
Is there any hard and fast rule on where the preposition should go in phrases like this, or is it open to personal preference?


Traditionally the object of the verb comes directly after the verb and that is usually the preferred word order.

With phrasal verbs the lines are blurred a bit, but consider it with a scenario that is not a phrasal verb:

I put the book on the table.

verb = put
object of verb= the book
preposition = on

If you ordered it like this, it would be odd:

I put on the table the book.

But with a phrasal verb like "put on" (as in your clothes) it is often used either way.

e.g. "Put on your clothes son" or "Put your clothes on son"
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Nov, 2008 05:20 pm
@kickycan,
who let the dogs out?
0 Replies
 
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Nov, 2008 08:04 pm
@kickycan,
Why not just shoot the dog in the head?
0 Replies
 
Deckland
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Nov, 2008 01:19 am
This is the sort of nonsense up with which I will not PUT.

Winston ?
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Nov, 2008 04:25 am
@kickycan,

Just you put on your coat and hat
And get yourself to the laundry-mat
And when you're finished doin' that
Bring in the dog and put out the cat
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Nov, 2008 05:29 am
@McTag,
Yakety-yak
Don't talk back
0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  0  
Reply Mon 10 Nov, 2008 07:48 am
Mame has the best answer. Just shoot the friggin' dog.
0 Replies
 
 

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